How would you remove this broken dead tree that's resting on a nearby tree?

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
It's dead with limbs and bark falling off. It's about twelve inches in diameter at the base. It's been dead about a year, broken over for several months. The live electrical equipment nearby makes it a little harder.

View attachment 66327
Is there any way to do it safely without grapple equipment, a crane, or a bucket truck?

Thankfully, it's not on my property.
This is dangerous work. Here is what I would likely do. It is but one possibility and puts the feller at risk. The pull on the green line must assure that there is no trunk movement.

broken hung tree.png
 
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owScott

Well-Known Member
Surly no need for that but you could probly get this down with one cut no rope necessary

Just notch it away from the tree its leaning in , set the hinge with a bore cut, release the backstrap and boogie into the woods on precleared escape route.
the force of the top pushing back on the low stem should be plenty of force to get it moving as long as the hinge is weak enough. and the top is not hung up.

worse case scenario set a pull line on the high side of the break and cripple the lower stem with same cut, and get out first, pull with truck ot loader.

any thoughts of climbing anything related to this job is complete stupidity.
That is total nonsense. a waste of time and energy and mush riskier than needed. This post shows your poor judgment and lack of ability and experience. You are an idiot.. don't ever criticize my work again. You've got no business pretending you have a clue!

For Winchman:
The only reason you'd need the rope in the top section is if the top was hung up. A close look at the way the branches are laying into each other should give you a pretty good idea of the potential problem there. My guess is with all that weight and it being dead for so long, the top will not hang up even if it is hooked.

You could get a sturdy rope 20' or less in the lower stem as a back up if the top didn't have enough to push the tree over, though you better know how to cut a very thin hinge with no bypass etc.
Yes I have been critical of your work and will continue to criticize your work without the need for name calling consider doing the same. I would have no problem climbing the tree the snag is hung in on the opposite side of the snag. What happens if the top comes free and goes side ways toward the electric meter after you cut the backstrap and boogie into the woods? I presented an option to reduce the potential of hitting the electric meter, never said it was the fastest or most energy saving method. What you suggests seems more risky and the outcome less predictable.
 

27RMT0N

Member
Here is a very similar situation, and a method that might work. I see the power box near by that will require avoiding or maybe protecting in some way, and the break on the trunk of course needs to be weak enough for the upper portion to separate, but it's something to consider:

Edit: only by someone who knows what they are doing that is...

 
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rico

Well-Known Member
Surly no need for that but you could probly get this down with one cut no rope necessary

Just notch it away from the tree its leaning in , set the hinge with a bore cut, release the backstrap and boogie into the woods on precleared escape route.
the force of the top pushing back on the low stem should be plenty of force to get it moving as long as the hinge is weak enough. and the top is not hung up.

worse case scenario set a pull line on the high side of the break and cripple the lower stem with same cut, and get out first, pull with truck ot loader.

any thoughts of climbing anything related to this job is complete stupidity.
Speaking of "idiotic nonsense", did your read your post buddy?

"probably"
"should"
"as long as"

Words we never want to hear when devising a solid game plan to deal with a hazardous tree with valuable electrical infrastructure nearby.

I myself will refrain from making any recommendations on this tree because it seems fairly clear that the OP does not have the skillset needed to safely deal with this little hanger. I would strongly suggest he simply walk away and let a pro handle it, or let it come down in its own sweet time. . No offense to the OP of coarse, but the risk just ain't worth the reward....
 
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RopeShield

Well-Known Member
static slideline or two, diagonal and anchored towards the lay away from the hung tree. This act as barrier for the electrical. This would add some insurance to treeco's method
Finish cut can be mde wiht polesaw
 

Winchman

Active Member
...it seems fairly clear that the OP does not process the skillset needed to safely deal with this little hanger. I would strongly suggest he simply walk away and let a pro handle it, or let it come down in its own sweet time. . No offense to the OP of coarse....
No offense taken. You're right, and that's exactly what I'm going to do...walk away.

There was a similar situation where I didn't walk away, though. I noticed a dead limb hung about forty feet up in a tree at the local elementary school right down the street. It was in an area that sees a lot of foot traffic every day.
2020-03-24_0052.png
I looked at Google street view, and saw that the snag had been there for almost a year, so I knew it was probably rotten. I sent an email with photos to the director of maintenance at the school district along with an offer to get it down for free. I got a notice that the email had been opened, but didn't get a reply.

I was driving by the school on a rainy evening about a month later, and I noticed that the heavy part of the limb had broken free and shifted away from the small stuff. I went home and returned with the BS and some rope. I got the throw bag and line over the limb, and the limb fell as I was retrieving the loose line. It was balanced that delicately.
2020-03-24_0112.png
Perhaps I should have handled it differently, but at least I didn't have to worry any more about that limb falling on someone's child.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
Speaking of "idiotic nonsense", did your read your post buddy?

"probably"
"should"
"as long as"

Words we never want to hear when devising a solid game plan to deal with a hazardous tree with valuable electrical infrastructure nearby.

I myself will refrain from making any recommendations on this tree because it seems fairly clear that the OP does not process the skillset needed to safely deal with this little hanger. I would strongly suggest he simply walk away and let a pro handle it, or let it come down in its own sweet time. . No offense to the OP of coarse, but the risk just ain't worth the reward....
Recommending a bore cut then cutting the backstrap while standing under the snag? I dont need insults that speaks for itself.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
No offense taken. You're right, and that's exactly what I'm going to do...walk away.

There was a similar situation where I didn't walk away, though. I noticed a dead limb hung about forty feet up in a tree at the local elementary school right down the street. It was in an area that sees a lot of foot traffic every day.
View attachment 66386
I looked at Google street view, and saw that the snag had been there for almost a year, so I knew it was probably rotten. I sent an email with photos to the director of maintenance at the school district along with an offer to get it down for free. I got a notice that the email had been opened, but didn't get a reply.

I was driving by the school on a rainy evening about a month later, and I noticed that the heavy part of the limb had broken free and shifted away from the small stuff. I went home and returned with the BS and some rope. I got the throw bag and line over the limb, and the limb fell as I was retrieving the loose line. It was balanced that delicately.
View attachment 66387
Perhaps I should have handled it differently, but at least I didn't have to worry any more about that limb falling on someone's child.
Good decision Winchman....Hung up trees/tops can bite the most experience of us in the ass from time to time.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Recommending a bore cut then cutting the backstrap while standing under the snag? I dont need insults that speaks for itself.
Yep-

"you could PROBLY get this down with one cut no rope necessary"

"the force of the top pushing back on the low stem SHOULD be plenty of force to get it moving AS LONG AS the hinge is weak enough"

"Just notch it away from the tree its leaning in , set the hinge with a bore cut, RELEASE THE BACKSTRAP AND BOOGIE INTO THE WOODS"

Fucking ridiculous advice to even the experienced, let alone the unexperienced....Like yourself owScott I would most likely have done some climbing to safely deal with this hanger....
 

Treezybreez

Well-Known Member
Open face notch as low on the trunk as possible facing the opposite direction as top. Leave a thick hinge. Use throw line to pull a running bowline close to the break. Pull on line from a safe distance with 5/1 ma or truck.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
That tree would be on the ground faster than this one, while Scott and Rico were just getting the climbing gear out of the truck.

 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Daniel I have a sincere question. Do you train up your employees to duplicate that method of cut and procedure for getting down a hung tree?

Thanks, Merle
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Daniel I have a sincere question. Do you train up your employees to duplicate that method of cut and procedure for getting down a hung tree?

Thanks, Merle
no
I make the messes around here.

from time to time I may teach a contract climber some cutting techniques.

every once in a while I get a phone call thanking me for sharing the knowledge.

But not this cut. Don't recall ever teaching this in person.

however there are examples of the online community that have picked it up successfully:

 
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