How would you remove this broken dead tree that's resting on a nearby tree?

Winchman

Active Member
It's dead with limbs and bark falling off. It's about twelve inches in diameter at the base. It's been dead about a year, broken over for several months. The live electrical equipment nearby makes it a little harder.

2020-03-21_dead_tree.png
Is there any way to do it safely without grapple equipment, a crane, or a bucket truck?

Thankfully, it's not on my property.
 

Matthew Stone

Active Member
I'd probably set a line down reasonably low on the upper part with the old throw bag and try to rip the bad wood loose off the stick, pulling directly against the lean. Shouldn't be very sturdy after that long and if anything is good it should peel. Chop the stick off after and collect a check. First thought
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
Looks like there's even a road right there, so you wouldn't need to tear up any lawn.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
The most conservative way would be to climb the tree its hung in and tip tie the snag using the other tree as a lowering point. Anchor the lowering line through a lowering device. As you lower off cut the limbs off the snag that may get hung up. Once on the ground fell the snag. 2 things may happen, the snag will seperate at the break and you can lower the top part down. If it stays together then cut pieces off the butt using a snap cut, peel cut or notch. If possible remove the small tree between the snag and tree its hung in.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
I'd probably set a line down reasonably low on the upper part with the old throw bag and try to rip the bad wood loose off the stick, pulling directly against the lean. Shouldn't be very sturdy after that long and if anything is good it should peel. Chop the stick off after and collect a check. First thought
Also maybe if you cant seperate the upper section from the lower section cut a notch at the base of the lower part and cut a back cut then pull causing the lower section to fall in the direction you are pulling.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
There are many ways to do this, and I am fond of the first idea, or a variant: Set a rope high on the spar, notch it opposite the direction of the top lean, or 90 degrees off if opposite doesn’t allow, and them make a bore cut through the spar, but do not cut the strap. Hook rope to loader/tractor/African elephant, and give a good solid pull. That should pull the whole mess over and out of the other tree the same time.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Also maybe if you cant seperate the upper section from the lower section cut a notch at the base of the lower part and cut a back cut then pull causing the lower section to fall in the direction you are pulling.
Be careful with that idea, the tree could fall while you’re under it, as the top is likely pushing laterally on the spar. If it falls, that top will land right on top of you! Better to make a bore cut and leave the strap so it does not fall while you’re under it, and trip it with a good solid pull on a long rope.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
Be careful with that idea, the tree could fall while you’re under it, as the top is likely pushing laterally on the spar. If it falls, that top will land right on top of you! Better to make a bore cut and leave the strap so it does not fall while you’re under it, and trip it with a good solid pull on a long rope.
yeah, i wasnt totally clear, i wouldnt complete the backcut just part of it then pull it to trip it. But your right leaving a small back strap would be better. Either way caution is warranted.
 
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Winchman

Active Member
Blowing up a tree like that is one of the stupidest things I've ever seen anyone do, but it was fun to watch.

The tree is on the campus of the local technical college. I was enrolled in the welding program there for ten years, so I have some connections and know something about how things get done...or not done.

I'm tempted to offer to take down the snag for free now that I've got some suggestions on how to do it. It's worth taking a closer look to see how stable the tree is. There are some other dead trees on the campus I could take care of as part of a package deal.
 
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Luzl78

Active Member
Set a pulley real high in the same tree or adjacent tree, set rope in high part of broken lead and pull the limb vertical. It should separate. If not at least it’s secure and you can make a cut to separate it and lower it. The wire dictates that solution.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Surly no need for that but you could probly get this down with one cut no rope necessary

Just notch it away from the tree its leaning in , set the hinge with a bore cut, release the backstrap and boogie into the woods on precleared escape route.
the force of the top pushing back on the low stem should be plenty of force to get it moving as long as the hinge is weak enough. and the top is not hung up.

worse case scenario set a pull line on the high side of the break and cripple the lower stem with same cut, and get out first, pull with truck ot loader.

any thoughts of climbing anything related to this job is complete stupidity.
 
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Winchman

Active Member
The wiring is buried, but the upper part of the tree could fall on the transformer enclosure, meter pedestal, and the other thing. I'm not sure where the buried cables go, probably to the lights in the nearby parking lot.

I bumped the tree lightly with a 2x4 yesterday, and large pieces of bark slid down the trunk. There's a lot more up there, so that's going to be a hazard while doing any work on the tree. The trunk seemed reasonably solid and stable, though. Getting a rope to stay in place on the upper section of the tree is going to be a challenge. There's nothing there to keep it from sliding off.
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My guess is the maintenance director will let it go until it falls by itself. Even if I thought I could do anything with it safely, they probably wouldn't let me because of liability issues.
 

Luzl78

Active Member
40’ ladder. Set pulley and rope in standing part of tree. Throw bag line to top of broken lead and pull broken lead into the standing tree?
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
The most conservative way would be to climb the tree its hung in and tip tie the snag using the other tree as a lowering point. Anchor the lowering line through a lowering device. As you lower off cut the limbs off the snag that may get hung up. Once on the ground fell the snag. 2 things may happen, the snag will seperate at the break and you can lower the top part down. If it stays together then cut pieces off the butt using a snap cut, peel cut or notch. If possible remove the small tree between the snag and tree its hung in.
That is total nonsense. a waste of time and energy and mush riskier than needed. This post shows your poor judgment and lack of ability and experience. You are an idiot.. don't ever criticize my work again. You've got no business pretending you have a clue!

For Winchman:
The only reason you'd need the rope in the top section is if the top was hung up. A close look at the way the branches are laying into each other should give you a pretty good idea of the potential problem there. My guess is with all that weight and it being dead for so long, the top will not hang up even if it is hooked.

You could get a sturdy rope 20' or less in the lower stem as a back up if the top didn't have enough to push the tree over, though you better know how to cut a very thin hinge with no bypass etc.
 

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