Driving auger bits?

colb

Well-Known Member
Ok. I mean I have an angle grinder (and it's allot lighter than the SH I just purchased), but it's another tool in the tree - are you saying you wouldn't use an angle grinder style tool at all for this purpose? I'd use a pair of dikes if I could cut through one strand at a time. Not a big deal, and that would actually be my preferred method, if it works. I've never handled EHS, hence all the questions.

Thanks, btw!
I've seen utility workers use angle grinders to cut cable. I use an angle grinder on EHS. I tape the cable with masking tape, then cut through with the angle grinder. I wear safety glasses. The angle grinder is dangerous to use at height because we are not used to them like we are chainsaws, so keep that in mind and respect the tool. I get really nice flat cut, but the metal cable strands melt into each other just a tiny bit. I can tap them to free them up.

I like @cerviarborist method and am jealous of it. It is safer than an angle grinder. I do question if his tool is compatible with all terminations, and it's just a question. I'd like to see what the cut cable looks like.

I use Endz with 5/16ths metal cabling and it is important to have the details of the cut sorted out before you show up on site or you'll end up "learning" and lot, which is a synonym for swearing.

On metal cabling and bracing day, I show up with three m18 fuel tools and a corded superhawg. I hang the tools I need on speedline clips on a sling at each branch where I am working.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Ok. I mean I have an angle grinder (and it's allot lighter than the SH I just purchased), but it's another tool in the tree - are you saying you wouldn't use an angle grinder style tool at all for this purpose? I'd use a pair of dikes if I could cut through one strand at a time. Not a big deal, and that would actually be my preferred method, if it works. I've never handled EHS, hence all the questions.

Thanks, btw!
Angle grinder has the weakness that I have to be careful to not break or fracture a thin disc while carrying it and using it. If you would be wiling to use dikes if they would work, you should know that an inexpensive pair of 24 inch bolt cutters will cut at least 1/4 inch EHS and probably 3/8 EHS. Just put a few wraps of duct tape around it to keep it from squishing.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
Angle grinder has the weakness that I have to be careful to not break or fracture a thin disc while carrying it and using it. If you would be wiling to use dikes if they would work, you should know that an inexpensive pair of 24 inch bolt cutters will cut at least 1/4 inch EHS and probably 3/8 EHS. Just put a few wraps of duct tape around it to keep it from squishing.
That keeps it from squishing? Wow.

Good word, @colb , on the learning. Haha! I'll do some cuts the night before to at least try and get that end of things sorted out.

Thank you guys for the advice. This is some super practical stuff!
 
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colb

Well-Known Member
That keeps it from squishing? Wow.

Good word, @colb , on the learning. Haha! I'll do some cuts the night before to at least try and get that end of things sorted out.

Thank you guys for the advice. This is some super practical stuff!
You of course are ordering the ANSI standard and bmp for supplemental support, right?
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
You of course are ordering the ANSI standard and bmp for supplemental support, right?
Got em in a cart. But I also have no immediate plans to do any cabling.

Here's the full deal: I'm doing a swing install requiring a high line towards the end of next week and have been in contact with 'the' swing guy around this area who has coached me through most questions I've had on this one. A knowledgeable company owner locally had also suggested that I get into cabling as part of the services I offer and advised me to pick up the cabling BMP. And, last week, an ISA BCMA I did a couple of reduction and storm damage jobs with asked if I'd come out and help him with a cabling job.

The only imminent thing is the highline/swing install tho. But hopefully I'll have tools that I can press forward with, as opportunities present themselves.

Whatcha think?

**Edit: corrected "A knowledge company owner...abused me..." to "...advised me..." xD
 
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colb

Well-Known Member
Got em in a cart. But I also have no immediate plans to do any cabling.

Here's the full deal: I'm doing a swing install requiring a high line towards the end of next week and have been in contact with 'the' swing guy around this area who has coached me through most questions I've had on this one. A knowledgeable company owner locally had also suggested that I get into cabling as part of the services I offer and abused me to pick up the cabling BMP. And, last week, an ISA BCMA I did a couple of reduction and storm damage jobs with asked if I'd come out and help him with a cabling job.

The only imminent thing is the highline/swing install tho. But hopefully I'll have tools that I can press forward with, as opportunities present themselves.

Whatcha think?
I think you're laying the right base in every way. Look at the bcma's specification if he will permit it. I wrote a 2-page cabling/bracing/pruning specification for the current estimate I have out. Basically, go through the whole standard and bmp for structural support and pruning and add in every relevant part to form a coherent specification. There are things outside the standards/only implied by the standards, but not many, that are also important to me. The biggest thing to remember is to include the phrase "to provide additional support". I communicate that to the client verbally during my site visit, and clearly in writing in the spec. For the pruning spec, I list number of cuts in <4" diameter wood (nod to Ed Gilman). If there is a reason, I list location in broad (half crown reduction, 20-inch diameter leader extending to the southeast over the residence, etc.) or specific (that branch in the photo) terms as needed.

On site, it is important to have diameter measurements for bracing rod size chart. I use larger/more rod in cases where the tree will attain a slightly larger terminal stature. The standard tends to list minimums for hardware, not maximums, so that is often helpful in deciding to size up. It is good to delineate the nature of the bracing installation either completely or 3/4 complete so that you have discretionary ability during the project. The top rods will always be dictated by the standard, so I put those in as dictated. The lower rods are of decreasing importance and I list a small range of how many will be installed to give me discretionary power. The cabling is usually easier to describe.

Each specification gets easier to write because you plagiarize from previous ones and you get to know the standard better, so my last one took about 30 minutes. Feels great to write a good specification because you can do the work and walk off site without thoughts that could linger every time you pass by the tree for years to come. I feel great about all my installs, and feel much better with my current written specs than my earliest ones. That is why I recommend looking at the bcma's spec if they are willing to share it with you.
 

SumoClimber

Active Member
If you're going to be doing a lot of cabling, I have 3 different directions I might suggest as far as cutting.
First off, Felco and some of the other companies do make cutters capable of shearing nearly an inch thick wire rope. Crescent HK Porter has a ratcheting version of the 8690 that'll do up to 3/4" cable. Want to say it's around $400.

Secondly, if you're going with an angle grinder, there are a few diamond blades designed for cutting, rather than using an abrasive disc that's 3x as thick. I have one made by Lennox, IIRC, they call it the Metal Max and it's about $10 a disc. Only way I'll do cutting w an angle grinder again, diameter stays the same, you don't wear away the blade, just the abrasive.

Lastly, if you want better living through technology, there are hand pump hydraulic versions available. I like the Pell Hydrashear, but my wallet likes the generic import made by HIT. Here's a link to a smaller HIT. https://www.westechrigging.com/hydr...MIg9Tczv_O6AIVYpJbCh3DrwHCEAkYBSABEgLsMfD_BwE

I'm curious about this particular cutter, but have not tried it myself yet. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07D7WQ4WZ/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_FakIEbPAFFX5G

One last thing, if you're worried about the wire rope deforming while you cut with an angle grinder, maybe use a pipe clamp rather than duct tape.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
I used my angle grinder for the work. The discs I used are made by Pferd and were designed for cut-off use. They still worked for face grinding too. I got sucked into buying another brand and found they didn't last. No economy there.

When I did cabling I used discs that were about half worn down.Just big enough to cut off and threaded rod. This reduced the jumping around and kick back. Think of the small carving tips on chainsaws. When I was using my grinder in the shop I'd change out discs and stash the half-used ones in my cabling bucket as back-ups

The ratcheting cutters are the AAA solution. For my setup though the angle grinder worked and fit my budget.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Sumo Climber cool to think of a diamond impregnated cut off wheel. That must be less susceptible to fracture or impervious to it huh? What is it base structure, metal?

(And you must know that abrasive cut off wheels can be uniformly thin through their whole body.)
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
On recommendation of a TBer I bought one of those wheels. It seemed to do as good a job at cutting and face grinding as the Pferd fiber abrasive wheels.

What was best is that the wheel doesn't become smaller in diameter as it wears. It just got dull. Having the disc full sized was invaluable!
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
If you would be wiling to use dikes if they would work
Are you saying dikes will work one strand at a time?

With all much money put into the tooling on this job already, I may hold off on >$300 worth of cutter. I'm only snipping 2 ends at the moment for this installation.

This makes me wish I'da gone to a challenge course workshop I was told about in Raleigh back in Feb :'(

Thanks for the word on the spec, @colb. I'll see if I can get ahold of that from the fellow!
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
No, couldn't see dimes working. Just, if you Really willing to go that low tech/sexy you should know about bolt cutters.

I wrap 1/4 EHS cable maybe 4 times tight with duct tape, it cuts easily with $20 24 inch bolt cutters.

For two cuts maybe go with what you have on hand, angle grinder.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
No, couldn't see dimes working. Just, if you Really willing to go that low tech/sexy you should know about bolt cutters.

I wrap 1/4 EHS cable maybe 4 times tight with duct tape, it cuts easily with $20 24 inch bolt cutters.

For two cuts maybe go with what you have on hand, angle grinder.
Well for <$50, I don't own bolt cutters anyway; that's a pretty widely useful item.
 

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