Driving auger bits?

cerviarborist

Very stable member
What are y'all driving auger bits with in the tree?

I'm about to do a swing install, and am ordering a 29"-long 9/16" diameter auger bit from WesSpur (probably),
Any particular reason you're buying such a small(ish) diameter bit? Unless there's a reason why a larger one wouldn't work, you might want to consider a 3/4", 7/8" or larger. I'd imagine you'd get a lot more use out of it on future bracing assignments.

I've got a corded Milwaukee Super Hawg, as well as a first generation M18 version. Both are beasts, and suitable for running large diameter auger bits through multiple feet of live oak, and they're both aces for cranking a GRCS for long lifts.
 
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Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
I have the corded Super Hawg too. Did a job with a lot of GRCS lifting a few months ago and my ground person was fighting the cord the whole job. As soon as I read another thread here about the 2nd gen M18 Hole Hawg having more grunt and enough to work the GRCS I knew I "needed" one. Next job, what a champ.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
Any particular reason you're buying such a small(ish) diameter bit? Unless there's a reason why a larger one wouldn't work, you might want to consider a 3/4", 7/8" or larger. I'd imagine you'd get a lot more use out of it on future bracing assignments.

I've got a corded Milwaukee Super Hawg, as well as a first generation M18 version. Both are beasts, and suitable for running large diameter auger bits through multiple feet of live oak, and they're both aces for cranking a GRCS for long lifts.
This was for a swing install (spanning a highline, then hanging a 'Swurfer') but the guy who owns the company I occasionally have done some training under and gone and worked with, suggested I add cabling to my services offered (after going and becoming educated on it, myself).
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
I don't even know what those are, but I can imagine the egg beaters, and yes, that is roughly what I was wondering about. And if he is manual drilling a through bolt vertically for a swing installation, isn't it easier than drilling horizontally?
Drilling horizontally - rigging a highline for a swing in between two trees.

I'm looking hard at the M18 Super. $699 for the kit (tool, 2x 6Ah batteries, charger).

I'm back in the price territory of an Echo gas drill: ~$600.

The cordless seems like it'd mentally be more versatile. And batteries could be used in other compatible equipment.

Leaving heavily towards cordless SH.
 

cerviarborist

Very stable member
I have the corded Super Hawg too. Did a job with a lot of GRCS lifting a few months ago and my ground person was fighting the cord the whole job. As soon as I read another thread here about the 2nd gen M18 Hole Hawg having more grunt and enough to work the GRCS I knew I "needed" one. Next job, what a champ.
I learned pretty quickly to plan the route for the cord as a part of the job preflight.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
A related question: if you guys have to purchase equipment for a job, but there is a reasonable chance that you'll use it on future jobs, do you build any of that into your estimate? A tenth of the cost of the tool, etc., etc.? Not talking about things like cranes.
 

Woodwork

Well-Known Member
I'm surprised more people don't use a brace and bit. The Bell System guys used them forever on telephone poles, and I would expect them to cut through green wood like a hot knife thru butter...
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Alright, gentlement - I'm about to do it: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwauk...-2-in-Right-Angle-Drill-Kit-2809-22/309809955

Standard 1/2" chuck will get me access to more bits, yeah?
That's why I went with a normal chuck.

I do add in a percentage of a specialty tool.

Brace and bits are great, light, affordable. I have them up on the shelf. They do cut green wood well. Not so good at lifting 1,000 lb logs with the GRCS.

As a side note I'm going to experiment with making Swedish Fire Logs by using a 3" +/- bit to cut the horizontal air hole and a 1" bit to drill three side by side vertical chimney holes instead of using a chainsaw.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
If it's not a super urgent assignment and can wait for a few weeks, you might want to watch this site for a reconditioned set. I've bought all my Milwaukee tools this way and they've all performed flawlessly. https://www.cpooutlets.com/on/demandware.store/Sites-cpooutlets-Site/default/Search-Show?q=M18+FUEL+18-Volt+Lithium-Ion+Brushless+Cordless+GEN+2+SUPER+HAWG+1/2+in.+Right+Angle+Drill+Kit&lang=default
Whooooops! Too late. With the shipping being questionable these virus-y days, I went ahead and jumped on it. I don't regret it though, so far - I trust y'all steered me right, the more I read about cordless power tools.

I think another thing I want to get for it is something that I can attach to cut the steel strands with once I anchor them. Does it have high enough RPM that you could use a cut-off type of disc, as would be on an angle grinder?
 

cerviarborist

Very stable member
I wouldn't suggest it. That machine has a lot of power and kickback with a blade or grinder could be dicey when you're doing rope access work. I bought a Baudat ratcheting cable cutter. I found it used on Ebay. It's sweet with lots of succulent mechanical advantage to cut through EHS cable. As a bonus, it compresses the cable on all sides as it cuts, so it leaves a nice compressed termination, which threads through drilled holes and fits into dead-end grips easily and neatly. Mine cuts soft cable up to 20mm in diameter, or EHS up to 16mm. More than adequate for my applications. Their current iteration of the one I use is SCSZ20. When you walk it through a piece of 3/8" EHS using moderate two handed pressure while it "click-click-click" bites through the cable, I guarantee you'll need plastic surgery to get the smile off your face.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't suggest it. That machine has a lot of power and kickback with a blade or grinder could be dicey when you're doing rope access work. I bought a Baudat ratcheting cable cutter. I found it used on Ebay. It's sweet with lots of succulent mechanical advantage to cut through EHS cable. As a bonus, it compresses the cable on all sides as it cuts, so it leaves a nice compressed termination, which threads through drilled holes and fits into dead-end grips easily and neatly. Mine cuts soft cable up to 20mm in diameter, or EHS up to 16mm. More than adequate for my applications.
Ok. I mean I have an angle grinder (and it's allot lighter than the SH I just purchased), but it's another tool in the tree - are you saying you wouldn't use an angle grinder style tool at all for this purpose? I'd use a pair of dikes if I could cut through one strand at a time. Not a big deal, and that would actually be my preferred method, if it works. I've never handled EHS, hence all the questions.

Thanks, btw!
 

cerviarborist

Very stable member
I've seen angle grinders used, but when there's a purpose made tool for the job, I prefer to go with that, and boy is the Baudat suited for its purpose!
 

colb

Well-Known Member
This was for a swing install (spanning a highline, then hanging a 'Swurfer') but the guy who owns the company I occasionally have done some training under and gone and worked with, suggested I add cabling to my services offered (after going and becoming educated on it, myself).
I use my m18 hammer drill for cabling drilling. The bigger drills are too cumbersome to haul around for cabling.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Drilling horizontally - rigging a highline for a swing in between two trees.

I'm looking hard at the M18 Super. $699 for the kit (tool, 2x 6Ah batteries, charger).

I'm back in the price territory of an Echo gas drill: ~$600.

The cordless seems like it'd mentally be more versatile. And batteries could be used in other compatible equipment.

Leaving heavily towards cordless SH.
You really don't want a gas drill. Lithium is so much better - no ear protection, no fumes, lots of power.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
A related question: if you guys have to purchase equipment for a job, but there is a reasonable chance that you'll use it on future jobs, do you build any of that into your estimate? A tenth of the cost of the tool, etc., etc.? Not talking about things like cranes.
Rule of thumb for me is at least 1/4 of the tool cost is built in to the current estimate, but it really depends on the tool. For bits, 100% of cost is for each project because most of them sit for years between use. The superhawg is an infrequent use item for me, so I would build 1/4-100% cost into an estimate, depending on whether the estimate was for a high dollar installation or a small side job. These cabling and bracing jobs tend to have kit that is used mainly for the job at hand. An exception to that is 3/4" threaded rod (and bits), 5/16" metal cable (and bits), and 3/4" dynamic cable.
 

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