What’s Your SMALLER Equipment Setup?

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
Following this post...

What are some of the best small scale tow behind chippers for pruning for those of us who want to keep things simple and streamlined?
There seems to be a big step between the Bandit 75XP and the next size up in terms of size and design that make it an important consideration to know what side one should be on. The 75xp has up to 35hp gas engine, 90° disc, is only ~2000 lbs., and has a 7x12" infeed. Here is a picture of my Thursday jobsite where I removed a shumard leader down to 9-10" diameter about 18" above the acute codominant junction, leaving a low limb on the removed leader and the better of the two leaders (which angles slightly away from the house towards the cul-de-sac). The remaining leader also received a structural and reduction cut where 3 branches emanated acutely from a union. I took the middle of the three for a ~4" diameter cut, resolving it to a very nice angle with the main leader pointing slightly away from the residence. Ideally, I would have pruned this tree for its first time about 10-15 years ago, but now was the second best time for it. The client was also given the option to cable and brace and chose this path, which I slightly preferred. The next step is to return in a year to make small structure prunes, then in two years to make reduction cuts to the two side branches - all pending how the tree responds. Note that I have a rope management inadequacy at my base tie in the one picture. The knives are about 2/3rds through their cycle.

When the debris were all on the ground, the 75xp handled it all as fast as we could operate, including a 7x12" crotch (see last picture). We had to turn it off twice to keep up. I cut up the >7" diameter pieces into about 7 chunks, put 6 in the chipper intake and one in the van and dumped them on my very small burn pile. The chips were applied as mulch to the front landscape beds. This was a 3-4 hr. project. with the two of us, from arrival on site to dumping the lumps.

The 90° disc makes the best looking square-cut chips. A 90XP - the next size up - is a 45° disc and reportedly makes more fibrous chips. Drum chippers are known to produce even stringier chips, but I defer to those who use them regarding that. Having done one large 30" diameter laurel oak removal for a friend with the 75xp, I would definitely use a large drum chipper for that work.

The 90XP is also surprisingly much heavier than the 75XP, so my mini skid is not suitable for pushing it around. I cannot currently push around my chipper because the square tube on my bmg is dented and will not accept the hitch attachment.

I'm supportive of other people's opinions about other chippers and I think to some extent the chipper you have chipping is the best one. The 65XP, of course, is almost identical.

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evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
A small ratchet strap would hold the sides while removing the gate without resistance.
Yes it would, but isn’t needed. Just barely hard enough some muscle is required, and kinda a pain, but not so hard it needs another solution. If I ever take it off, and put it on a different truck (or trailer) I’d just have some channel welded around the outside bottom and edges to stiffen it, and redo the tail gate to a drop down.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Location
Olympia, WA
@colb

Consider a dedicated hitch plate for about $100-150 bucks. More capacity than the BMG (that I almost always use).

Consider having fabricated a discharge chute attachment that will more effectively load your chips.

I use recycle/ yard waste carts, sometimes, blowing directly into 2-3 lined up, lid propped open about 45-60*.
I keep my RPMs down, as I can do that, otherwise it would blow too hard.

Rarely do I move chips for customers...I let them/ their landscape laborer do it, mostly.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
There seems to be a big step between the Bandit 75XP and the next size up in terms of size and design that make it an important consideration to know what side one should be on. The 75xp has up to 35hp gas engine, 90° disc, is only ~2000 lbs., and has a 7x12" infeed. Here is a picture of my Thursday jobsite where I removed a shumard leader down to 9-10" diameter about 18" above the acute codominant junction, leaving a low limb on the removed leader and the better of the two leaders (which angles slightly away from the house towards the cul-de-sac). The remaining leader also received a structural and reduction cut where 3 branches emanated acutely from a union. I took the middle of the three for a ~4" diameter cut, resolving it to a very nice angle with the main leader pointing slightly away from the residence. Ideally, I would have pruned this tree for its first time about 10-15 years ago, but now was the second best time for it. The client was also given the option to cable and brace and chose this path, which I slightly preferred. The next step is to return in a year to make small structure prunes, then in two years to make reduction cuts to the two side branches - all pending how the tree responds. Note that I have a rope management inadequacy at my base tie in the one picture. The knives are about 2/3rds through their cycle.

When the debris were all on the ground, the 75xp handled it all as fast as we could operate, including a 7x12" crotch (see last picture). We had to turn it off twice to keep up. I cut up the >7" diameter pieces into about 7 chunks, put 6 in the chipper intake and one in the van and dumped them on my very small burn pile. The chips were applied as mulch to the front landscape beds. This was a 3-4 hr. project. with the two of us, from arrival on site to dumping the lumps.

The 90° disc makes the best looking square-cut chips. A 90XP - the next size up - is a 45° disc and reportedly makes more fibrous chips. Drum chippers are known to produce even stringier chips, but I defer to those who use them regarding that. Having done one large 30" diameter laurel oak removal for a friend with the 75xp, I would definitely use a large drum chipper for that work.

The 90XP is also surprisingly much heavier than the 75XP, so my mini skid is not suitable for pushing it around. I cannot currently push around my chipper because the square tube on my bmg is dented and will not accept the hitch attachment.

I'm supportive of other people's opinions about other chippers and I think to some extent the chipper you have chipping is the best one. The 65XP, of course, is almost identical.

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You are entirely correct on the 90*, vs 45* vs drum. This thought varies with knife sharpening and material.
A receiver hitch plate is about 100$ likely cheaper and easier than fixing the BMG and a much more secure attachment.
I’m in the crux of wanting and needing a bigger chipper 90xp or 12xp but there goes pushing it around (my mini can reposition much larger machines, but can’t take them off flat gravel or paved surface very well). With my lil “9 inch” I can get it nearly anywhere the axle will fit.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
@colb

Consider a dedicated hitch plate for about $100-150 bucks. More capacity than the BMG (that I almost always use).

Consider having fabricated a discharge chute attachment that will more effectively load your chips.

I use recycle/ yard waste carts, sometimes, blowing directly into 2-3 lined up, lid propped open about 45-60*.
I keep my RPMs down, as I can do that, otherwise it would blow too hard.

Rarely do I move chips for customers...I let them/ their landscape laborer do it, mostly.
I definitely acknowledge the need to improve my chip chute -> wheelbarrow game. The catchy cans and debris predator make it more efficient than it looks. I can scrape that area in a minute or two. Seems like the catchy cans are catching 75-85%, and that goes straight into the barrow. What is a good material for it? Pvc tarp?

I bill my rate to manage chips. I like it, with wheels. I like the phc aspect. At days end, by the time the chips are applied correctly it's about the same for the client and there are no application shortcomings.

Sounds like I need a hitch plate. Thanks for the bump guys. Always appreciate it.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
Nice chipper chute Colb - being adjustable.

To shoot chips straight down beside the chipper wheel or into a can as South Sound referred to, a light weight 45° plastic culvert fitting works well. Shade cloth wrapped around top of wheeled or unheeded garbage can keeps it all in place.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
I took the bed off my F-250, put some air helper springs on the rear axle, built a (too big) chip box for the back, and pull a bandit 150XP most days. I'm around 14k empty including the chipper and scared to know what I weigh loaded. I'll only fill the box all the way full if I can dump on site or if there's a chipdrop really close by and I don't have to pull my chipper to the dump site. It's awesome for squeezing in tight driveways, but I wish the chassis had more weight capacity so I could drive with a load on a main road if I needed to and put some belly boxes under the box for more storage.
It looks good. But it would be way overloaded for F350 Single Wheel too. (So don't pine for a different rig too much.)
 

dspacio

Active Member
Location
Narragansett Bay
Mushroom cultivation calls for wood, no leaf.


Composted Maple chips plus cow manure or other organic matter makes a good amendment for vegetable gardening.
emphasis on the "composted" chips. wood chips are great for mulching as a top cover, but mixed into garden soil they leach nitrogen out like a sponge, no good.

I cover the food garden with ~4" of wood chips every few years and it is great for slowly adding soil, mycelium, worms, and keeping weeds down, but be warned to leave it as a top-dressing (and tell any of the clients that).
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
emphasis on the "composted" chips. wood chips are great for mulching as a top cover, but mixed into garden soil they leach nitrogen out like a sponge, no good.

I cover the food garden with ~4" of wood chips every few years and it is great for slowly adding soil, mycelium, worms, and keeping weeds down, but be warned to leave it as a top-dressing (and tell any of the clients that).
 

Tayer

Member
Location
North east
This is the best I’ve seen for sure. He actually can get a wide range of work done and it seems efficient. I don’t see why the kuboto couldn’t be swapped out with a mini and one extra attachment either


I think he went with the Kubota because it’s also his chipper.
 

Tayer

Member
Location
North east
Following this post...

What are some of the best small scale tow behind chippers for pruning for those of us who want to keep things simple and streamlined?
I have a power king 5”or 6” chipper 14 hp and it’s great. $2500 new you can tow it but only about 30 mph I have an enclosed trailer for mine.
 

Tayer

Member
Location
North east
Just posted this on another thread but it also belongs here. I’ve got a gmc 1500 with a tailgate unloader tarp system for $50 from harbor freight. And an enclosed trailer that houses my 5” power king chipper and yard max mini track skidder. Also all of my 7 saws, ropes, poles saws, hedge trimmers, blowers, rigging and climbing gear. The 16’ orchard ladder is locked to the racks on top. The brush mower usually isn’t in there I borrowed it for a job this weekend. Whole set up is awesome for pruning and removals I push for chipping into the woods as well as the customer keeping firewood when I can.
 

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27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
Just posted this on another thread but it also belongs here. I’ve got a gmc 1500 with a tailgate unloader tarp system for $50 from harbor freight. And an enclosed trailer that houses my 5” power king chipper and yard max mini track skidder. Also all of my 7 saws, ropes, poles saws, hedge trimmers, blowers, rigging and climbing gear. The 16’ orchard ladder is locked to the racks on top. The brush mower usually isn’t in there I borrowed it for a job this weekend. Whole set up is awesome for pruning and removals I push for chipping into the woods as well as the customer keeping firewood when I can.

Cool setup, I'd be curious to hear more about the Yard Max unit and how you utilize it. I've wondered about buying something similar for when I need to move wood rounds uphill, or just getting tools from the truck to the tree project for the day.
 

Tayer

Member
Location
North east
It’s surprisingly good obviously the wood has to come out pretty much fire wood size but I feel more limited by the pick up than I do by the yard max if I had a bigger truck or a dump trailer to fill that would help. Price is just unbeatable only $2,200 new.
 

Barc Buster

Well-Known Member
It’s surprisingly good obviously the wood has to come out pretty much fire wood size but I feel more limited by the pick up than I do by the yard max if I had a bigger truck or a dump trailer to fill that would help. Price is just unbeatable only $2,200 new.
You got a nice set up there. I made a lot of money with a similar woodmaxx machine last year. It worked fine. In fact I pushed that machine pretty hard with spruce, dead ash, hard maple, etc. It impressed me. It should serve you well until you can upgrade. It was a lot of extra labor vs the bandit 65xp I would occasionally rent. The woodmaxx allowed me to make money, save up, and purchase a used bandit 90xp with a kubota diesel.
 

Tree-Taylor

Well-Known Member
Location
Canada
It’s surprisingly good obviously the wood has to come out pretty much fire wood size but I feel more limited by the pick up than I do by the yard max if I had a bigger truck or a dump trailer to fill that would help. Price is just unbeatable only $2,200 new.
How do you find working with that little chipper? I'm seriously considering getting one to wheel into backyards but I'm not sure if I will be able to tolerate operating one.
 

Tayer

Member
Location
North east
Cool setup, I'd be curious to hear more about the Yard Max unit and how you utilize it. I've wondered about buying something similar for when I need to move wood rounds uphill, or just getting tools from the truck to the tree project for the day.
The yard max is ok I don’t use it too terribly often most of the time wood stays or I can back the pick up right to any pile but even for the 3-5 times I’ve used it it paid for itself. Id maybe consider getting the one with a flat bed mines more like a wheel barrel hopper. I think you could build out some racks to hold more material that way.
 

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