Twin bridges on treemo

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
I'm open to being totally wrong on this, but this doesn't actually offer much, if any redundancy, does it?
Having two unique connection points on a dual-rope- bridge is better than one, IMHO. Once a second climbing system, or a lanyard is added to the system, having a dual rope bridge balances the loads better and offers a lot better maneuverability.
 

TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
Location
Beautiful South
Thanks for the helpful pointer. A Scaffold knot, aka double fisherman's knot is clearly a top choice for connecting a rope to a d-ring. I'm not opposed to learning something new and while we can all make mistakes, I'm glad we have a sounding board like this to work through this stuff. I see the scaffold has some steveadore characterisitcs too. For this intended purpose, I will use it from now on and I appreciate everyone's constructive advice.
FYI, the double fishermans knot is distinct and separate from the double fishermans loop. The dfloop is identical to the double scaffold because it's tied around itself instead of another end of rope. If we were talking about this without pictures, the correct terminology becomes very important to the understanding of the discussion.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
FYI, the double fishermans knot is distinct and separate from the double fishermans loop. The dfloop is identical to the double scaffold because it's tied around itself instead of another end of rope. If we were talking about this without pictures, the correct terminology becomes very important to the understanding of the discussion.
Thanks again. It's hard to find a reliable source for all this helpful information. Evo's earlier reference to the scaffold knot is listed on the web site under sailing knots, not climbing knots, and results can vary when trying to find a definitive reference to anything. I like when everyone shares illustrations or video clips when demonstrating their point, so we don't find ourselves on some wild goose chase.
 
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TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
Location
Beautiful South
Having two unique connection points on a dual-rope- bridge is better than one, IMHO. Once a second climbing system, or a lanyard is added to the system, having a dual rope bridge balances the loads better and offers a lot better maneuverability.
I never considered this. Is this true? Should I try my Sequoia with a couple bridges?
 

CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
It looks like if the primary (original) bridge breaks and the added bridge is terminated on it (as in the referenced videos from the past few posts), then you're going down.

What am I missing?
I would agree with this statement.

The dual bridges may function as a single point of PPE but it could offer the user the ability to attach two different positioning lines with less clash between the hardware (rings, swivels, etc)
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
Location
Ny
It looks like if the primary (original) bridge breaks and the added bridge is terminated on it (as in the referenced videos from the past few posts), then you're going down.

What am I missing?
Your right. That's just that's guys preference. 2 bridges plus 4 termination knots equals redundancy
 

CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
Your right. That's just that's guys preference. 2 bridges plus 4 termination knots equals redundancy
It's redundant only if you cut the "outside" bridge. If you cut the inside bridge through the small holes, the outside bridge simply pulls out and you fall. It's only redundant if the outer bridge fails.
I wouldn't consider that redundant ... not in a holistic sense of redundancy that two separate bridges offer you.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
Location
Chatham Co.
Your right. That's just that's guys preference. 2 bridges plus 4 termination knots equals redundancy
Gotcha. If the second/added one breaks, and he's hooked around both, then he's good to go. Other way around, and he's headed towards the ground if just the primary breaks. In my way of thinking, that equals 'no redundancy at all'.

In other words, there is a link in the system, which - if it breaks - results in a fall; namely, the original bridge.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
There's no question as to the integrity of the Evo TM's new dual rope bridge's D-ring design. It safely handles a dual rope bridge and the dual-stopper knot seems safer than the original TM's single rope stopper knot. However, when we are DIY'ing our own dual rope bridge, it really boils down to how well the secondary rope bridge's connection is. Bottom line, it's never going to be as dependable as the Evo's upgraded d-rings, without using similarly upgraded d-rings.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
I think Kevin Bingham uses scaffold knots on his TM's 2nd rope bridge too. What does everyone recommend for use as a second rope bridge? Hitch cord is too abrasive and climbing ropes are a bit large, diameter wise. It's probably best to buy a couple TM replacement bridges, since the ends are already sewn and milking can be prevented.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
Location
Chatham Co.
I think Kevin Bingham uses scaffold knots on his TM's 2nd rope bridge too. What does everyone recommend for use as a second rope bridge? Hitch cord is too abrasive and climbing ropes are a bit large, diameter wise. It's probably best to buy a couple TM replacement bridges, since the ends are already sewn and milking can be prevented.
Strange, they seem to be out of stock at the first places I normally check (SherrillTree, Wesspur).
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Location
Montana
Yeah, they showed it with an accessory cord I think. Just wanted to make sure it was understood what they used for tying onto the bridge. I'm not normal a fan of the anchor hitch but it works well with that particular rope bridge, partially because the ends have a stiff flat stitch that keeps the anchor from working out too far.
 

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