Old Growth Views

stig

New Member
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Diane,
When ripped into slabs redwood burl will exhibit the many minute individual bud, or branch eyes. It's referred to as "lace burl" by the burl cutters where I live, and it is highly valued.

Nurls, when ripped, exhibit a twisted grain that often looks like fire, flare, more typical of root pattern. Nurls do not exhibit any bud eyes or lace pattern.

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Here is an example of both kinds. The lace burl is european elm ( ulmus glabra), the "nurl" is beech (fagus sylvatica).
 

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Thanks, Jerry, for the clarification on nurls and burls.

The nurl in my photo is 15 ft. above the root crown and about 10+ft. across and 6ft in depth and height.
And still actively growing!
It seems to arise out of the union area of not two but three trunk stems that are each now 160 ft. tall.

And, Guy, your thoughts on it adding support to that union are definitely interesting and possible.

Just another of the many fascinating mysteries of Nature.


-Diane-
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
Stig, those are some incredible bowls! I am waiting for one from a friend here who is turning it out of a dead beech that I removed from the property where Bruce Springstein grew up. Can't wait.
 

Roger_Barnett

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the pics and explanations, Ger, and Diane! Beautiful bowl, Stig. I too have some bowls coming from craftsmen to whom I'm supplying wood.
 

stig

New Member
That is the way to go, guys.
When you fall something with burls or rippled grain or beautiful spalting, contact your local woodturner and ask if they want it in exchange for something made out of it.
American Association of Woodturners have a list of turners in america on their homepage. www.woodturner.org
I've set up a woodexchange on a Danish internet forum for turners, so when I have more wood than I know what to do with, I can pass it on to others.
It is really too bad, when something that could be made into a thing of beauty, ends up on the firewood pile.
 

mdvaden

Well-Known Member
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Is that a burl or a conk above your head on the last pic?

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Not to take the light off those beautiful giants, Jerry.
Keep the photos coming!

But here is one I'd like to share in reference to Guy's comment:

-Diane-

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Now that you mention burls, here is one about 1/3 of a mile deeper in the redwoods from the Grove of Titans. The trunk under this burl / canker is 5' to 6' in diameter. Very few that I've seen looking like this. Completely encircles the trunk...

 

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mdvaden

Well-Known Member
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Over the weekend Terri and I hiked through the Redwood Groves of Lost Man Creek, Prairie Creek and Jed Smith. It's just amazing what you find when you discover new trails.

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Nice photos.

I think the one that is about the 6th attachment is my favorite photo. The one where the redwood is on the slope.

Was back in the redwoods myself near October first.

Guess what I found out?

The tree I previously saw online for the Grove of Titans as "Lost Monarch" at other websites - I assumed originated from Robert Van Pelt and clan. Turns out it is Screaming Titans. Now I am not scratching my head anymore wondering why no other tree in the Grove of Titans area fits a Screaming Titans description. Lost Monarch's trunk is buried in foliage, stumps and trees, while Screaming Titans is the one with the big stem more in view for photographing.

So, turns out that I already photographed Lost Monarch last winter, but never took a tape to it. It's foliage hangs so low, it makes it's trunk look smaller.

<font color="brown"> The foliage of Lost Monarch hovers 16" above the ground. Not 16 feet. Not 160 feet. But 16 inches. I don't recall the last time I saw foliage that low on a tree 1/2 it's age.</font>

Will the real Lost Monarch please stand up:

 

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