another one for Rico

Daniel

Well-Known Member
You're not the only one stuck in some orthodoxy of how a face cut "should look" when you can see right in front of your eyes the size of those hinge fibers. That cut is something under 16"... maybe 13-15... That is Tulip, a species with notoriously bad holding wood. Yet the size of the fibers shows that the hinge had incredible holding ability. I will put it out to ANYONE.. show me a hinge in this diameter wood that has hinge fibers this big. Post up a picture if you got it.


You should be taking notes instead of running your mouth.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
.
You're not the only one stuck in some orthodoxy of how a face cut "should look" when you can see right in front of your eyes the size of those hinge fibers. That cut is something under 16"... maybe 13-15... That is Tulip, a species with notoriously bad holding wood. Yet the size of the fibers shows that the hinge had incredible holding ability. I will put it out to ANYONE.. show me a hinge in this diameter wood that has hinge fibers this big. Post up a picture if you got it.


You should be taking notes instead of running your mouth.
Taking notes? Thats funny Daniel...How many stabs with a dull saw did it take you to make that undercut buddy? Any halfway decent pro could have done it in 2 cuts, but it looks like it took you at least 3-5 cuts....

Que up the nonsensical nonsense.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
I use multiple cuts of the face on purpose to give the hinge more holding ability. You seem to think that I use multiple cuts because I can't match up my face cuts. That's was a simple cut. A normal face could have easily been made with 2 cuts. I use the plate cut to add height to the hinge fibers and you see the results....

The hinge had extraordinary holding ability. More than any hinge of that diameter that few if any have ever seen....

Your stuck in some orthodox of making a face cut in two cuts is mindless.

The time it took to doctor that cut, was a few extra seconds. Fast and effective. Got the job done on a day few would have even attempted to deal with that wind.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
The Semmelweis reflex or “Semmelweis effect” is a metaphor for the reflex-like tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it contradicts established norms, beliefs or paradigms.
November262016

The term originated from the story of Ignaz Semmelweis, who discovered that childbed fever mortality rates reduced ten-fold when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients and, most particularly, after an autopsy (at the institution where Semmelweis worked, a university hospital, physicians performed autopsies on every deceased patient). Semmelweis’s decision stopped the ongoing contamination of patients—mostly pregnant women—with “cadaverous particles”.[1] His hand-washing suggestions were rejected by his contemporaries, often for non-medical reasons. For instance, some doctors refused to believe that a gentleman’s hands could transmit disease (see Contemporary reaction to Ignaz Semmelweis).

What this little synopsis fails to mention is that Semmelweis was ruined by his contemporaries, lost his job, ridiculed, and then tricked into visiting a mental institution where he was abducted and held against his will, beaten by the guards and died two weeks later. All because the doctors of the day were saying that a gentleman's hands could not transmit disease, which makes about as much sense as you saying that a face cut should be made in two cuts.

 
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rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
More revisionist bullshit Daniel... You remember when you told us that you use multiple cuts on your undercut because you simply don't process the ability to do it like a professional faller..One, two, hit it with an axe and your undercut pops out...Quickly clean it up, make it near perfect, and hit your backcut.....Eazy parcheezy.

If you were in fact trying to increase the height of your hinge fibers you could have simply made a legit box/block cut. Instead you once again resort to this kind of hackery.....

Screen Shot 2020-05-29 at 7.42.27 AM.png
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
I've been making this cut for years. it creates the same effect as a block cut, better-holding wood. If I can get the same effect in a matter of seconds, without the bother of grabbing an ax, I wouldn't bother grabbing the ax. That is far more inefficient than taking an extra 20 seconds to make the face. A complete waste of time in my world.

On a large cut I find the plate cut BOTH easier to make and also more effective in holding ability. On a smaller cut, which is so simple to match cuts, I won't bother using it unless there is some benefit to the extra height to the hinge fibres. HERE you can see how ell the hinge held... If you can't see that those hinge fibers held better than any normal face, YOU ARE OUT OF TOUCH WITH REALITY.

On a small cut like that, it's only a matter of seconds of additional effort. Your suggestion to grab an ax and bust out a block face in the bucket is laughable and shows you are full of nonsense. Your mind is stuck in some orthodoxy that is soon to be outdated. Your criticisms of anything other than a straight hinge and simple face cut are complete in the box thinking.

And it's amazing how vicious you attack me and the new paradigm when Sean a pass after dropping a tree on his chipper. You know that chipper has wheels...
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
You might want to think about learning the basics first Daniel. Things like reading a simple backlean, or making a decent undercut. Before you start creating a "new paradigm" you probably should stop losing little back yard shrub tops over backwards buddy.... As they say, you have to walk before you can run.

Screen Shot 2020-05-29 at 5.31.09 PM.png
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
I've done stuff you have never done I've gone stuff nobody on this site has ever done and I've done stuff with a chainsaw nobody in the world has ever done.

I've long ago transcended your little rules about how to make a face and a straight hinge

That's 15 years old in my book
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Here's an unconventional face for you, not two cuts... 50


SO by your theory, this guy is a hack.. in reality, he can cut circles around anyone this site.

Another amazing job by Jack...That was a very ugly, burned out school warm and not a task for anyone but a high level pro. I could tell you just how brilliant and ballsy it was to completely cut off the front leaner and use its lean to pull over the back leaner, but you wouldn't really understand because you have zero experience or knowledge concerning what we all just witnessed. Trust me when I tell you that was a thoughtful and well executed piece of felling on Jack's part....
 
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Daniel

Well-Known Member
Everything Jack does is thoughtful and well-executed... that's my point...

He carved away at that notch to do whatever it took to get the tree to the lay. He worked on that notch for close to 20 minutes. I spend an extra 5 to 20 seconds on my notches and you call me a hack, not because the trees don't make the lay, which they always do, but because you're not familiar with the way I cut a notch.

You're using a double standard. Same as with Sean dropping a tree on his chipper. You didn't say a word. He lost the tree to lay which was big of him to show, but the fact that he didn't even have the sense to move the chipper out of the potential DZ is pure stupidity. You just let that go. Why?

Here's a video showing a technique that has never been shown before or since. No one even understood how it was done when I first showed it. Notice 1400 views and only one comment.. It's so far above everyone's head they don't know what to say.

 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
1. I am quite familiar with the way you cut a notch.. Pure hackery. Borne out of the fact that you lack the very basis skills needed to do it properly...


Lets take a real close look at your finished product in this video for gawd sakes...An cringe worthy abomination.

Is this undercut part of the "new paradigm" you are creating Daniel. Is loosing that little backyard shrub top over backwards part of your "new paradigm" master plan Dan?

Screen Shot 2020-05-29 at 5.31.09 PM.png

"Never seen before"? "Far above everyone's head"?
 
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southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Location
Olympia, WA
I've done stuff you have never done I've gone stuff nobody on this site has ever done and I've done stuff with a chainsaw nobody in the world has ever done.

I've long ago transcended your little rules about how to make a face and a straight hinge

That's 15 years old in my book
Anyone have a good recommendation for a psychiatrist?

Must be able to handle a delusional person with an infallibility complex, delusions of grandeur, and deprogram what the aliens did when they came to earth, proclaiming godlike status upon a guy who can handle a saw, just not cut well with it.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Anyone have a good recommendation for a psychiatrist?

Must be able to handle a delusional person with an infallibility complex, delusions of grandeur, and deprogram what the aliens did when they came to earth, proclaiming godlike status upon a guy who can handle a saw, just not cut well with it.
Word! Get some help Daniel... For realz....
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Doctor must not work in the box.
Prefer someone who work chicken guts, to supposedly pull from patient's abdomen.
Speaks lizard-tongue.
Coming from the guy that doesn't have the sense to move his chipper out of the drop zone and then proceeds to slam it with a big tree. brilliant. and just the latest in a long line of stupidity in word and deed from you.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
1. I am quite familiar with the way you cut a notch.. Pure hackery. Borne out of the fact that you lack the very basis skills needed to do it properly...

Lets take a real close look at your finished product in this video for gawd sakes...An cringe worthy abomination.

Is this undercut part of the "new paradigm" you are creating Daniel. Is loosing that little backyard shrub top over backwards part of your "new paradigm" master plan Dan?

View attachment 68267

"Never seen before"? "Far above everyone's head"?
There is no bypass in that face. NONE

And even if there was any bypass in the center of the face, I was about to bore out the center leaving about 8-10" of wood on each side, so bypass in the center wouldn't have mattered.

The DZ was fairly wide open, so I wasn't worried about that slight 1-2" differential in the floor of the face pushing the tree to the right. Given the sheer mass of that stick and height and the momentum, you should know that the tree wasn't going to turn from that little step anyhow.

That cut was made with a 28" bar and given that the slight overlap, the notch was right about 4' wide. The technique I used was quick, easy, and effective. That cutting may not be the same level as a west coast faller, but I don't need it to be. And I never claimed that to have that type of skill with a saw. I'll never be able to cut a Humboldt like Pat Lacey. NO EAST COAST ARBORIST EVER WILL.

And so yes this is part of the new paradigm. Understanding all the factors at play that will contribute to the tree making the lay, and using a fast and effective cutting technique to get the job done.

Your criticism of this notch is another clear indication of your in the box orthodoxy. If you had an open mind.. a little sense and throw in some experience, you would know a tree that big, moving that fast when the face closes will not turn from that little step in the face. The fact that you can't see that brings us right back to the same place we always seem to end up. My trees make the lay and you don't like how they get there.

I do what works for me. I have a complete understanding of the physics and principles involved in falling and rigging trees as well as anyone in the world. I use that understanding to break the "rules" of standard cutting techniques whenever I find that useful, easier or expeditve. Others have to stick to the rules because they lack full understanding.

And I have used that complete understanding to pioneer many new cuts and techniques never shown before. People like you are stuck in your little boxes. Your inability to see outside that box gets in the way of progress.

That's the level of my work. So let's talk about this video. You are noticeably quiet about it. You've never seen anything like .. no one else has either because it's never been shown before.

 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Luckily you are here to teach him a new way of doing things Daniel... A paradigm shift, it you will..
There is no bypass in that face. NONE

And even if there was any bypass in the center of the face, I was about to bore out the center leaving about 8-10" of wood on each side, so bypass in the center wouldn't have mattered.

The DZ was fairly wide open, so I wasn't worried about that slight 1-2" differential in the floor of the face pushing the tree to the right. Given the sheer mass of that stick and height and the momentum, you should know that the tree wasn't going to turn from that little step anyhow.

That cut was made with a 28" bar and given that the slight overlap, the notch was right about 4' wide. The technique I used was quick, easy, and effective. That cutting may not be the same level as a west coast faller, but I don't need it to be. And I never claimed that to have that type of skill with a saw. I'll never be able to cut a Humboldt like Pat Lacey. NO EAST COAST ARBORIST EVER WILL.

And so yes this is part of the new paradigm. Understanding all the factors at play that will contribute to the tree making the lay, and using a fast and effective cutting technique to get the job done.

Your criticism of this notch is another clear indication of your in the box orthodoxy. If you had an open mind.. a little sense and throw in some experience, you would know a tree that big, moving that fast when the face closes will not turn from that little step in the face. The fact that you can't see that brings us right back to the same place we always seem to end up. My trees make the lay and you don't like how they get there.

I do what works for me. I have a complete understanding of the physics and principles involved in falling and rigging trees as well as anyone in the world. I use that understanding to break the "rules" of standard cutting techniques whenever I find that useful, easier or expeditve. Others have to stick to the rules because they lack full understanding.

And I have used that complete understanding to pioneer many new cuts and techniques never shown before. People like you are stuck in your little boxes. Your inability to see outside that box gets in the way of progress.

That's the level of my work. So let's talk about this video. You are noticeably quiet about it. You've never seen anything like .. no one else has either because it's never been shown before.

There it is... You just admitted that the reason you resort to your hackery at the stump is because you lack the very basic skills needed to make a proper undercut. Tens of thousand of us do everyday Daniel. Men like Pat Lacey, Jack (hotsaws), and just about everyone here can manage to do it, but for some strange reason you can't...Instead of learning this very basic skill you try and tell yourself, as well as others that through your deeper and fuller understanding you have somehow managed to transcend all the rules of sound falling practices...All this coming from the man who just posted a video of himself losing a little top over backwards. Pure fucking rubbish....
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
see that... you are still refusing to acknowledge and comment on the facts presented in the remote trip swing video.

No one has ever done anything like it. Why don't you address that?

why don't you reprimand Sean for dropping a tree on his chipper?

OH GOD if that was me you would have gone on for a year about it calling me every gawdawful name on the planet.
 

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