Trimming a Neighbor’s Tree

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Victor Murello and other lawyers have made a good living working both sides of the property line

Define ‘harm’

If there is a lawsuit in these cases there is generally triple damages...attention getting!

I’d never do any work across a property line without a face to face and a signed communication.
 

climbingmonkey24

Well-Known Member
Location
Ludlow
I think this is a good lesson that going forward, next time I go see a job with this situation I am going to explain to client that I need direct consent from neighbor and see if I can just go over right then and there and get it out of the way before submitting a bid.

And I’m sure some will be fine with it and others may tell me they aren’t interested anymore.

Because you have to remember, there could be a long lasting issue between the neighbor's and you’re the poor guy in the middle.
 

Da Pollinator

New Member
Location
new jersey
I always talk to the neighbor and get permission and always dead wood the tree and offer a light trim for free for allowing me easy access into the canopy,then I become there tree guy:numberone:I have learned as a tree guy we can make bad blood good blood with good good vibes!!!!sometimes I feel like more a psychiatrist then an arborist:ROFLMAO:but I love it!!!!!!!!
 

VenasNursery

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
I always talk to the neighbor and get permission and always dead wood the tree and offer a light trim for free for allowing me easy access into the canopy,then I become there tree guy:numberone:I have learned as a tree guy we can make bad blood good blood with good good vibes!!!!sometimes I feel like more a psychiatrist then an arborist:ROFLMAO:but I love it!!!!!!!!
We call it “Dr Phill Time”
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
Location
Lancaster, PA
I think this is a good lesson that going forward, next time I go see a job with this situation I am going to explain to client that I need direct consent from neighbor and see if I can just go over right then and there and get it out of the way before submitting a bid.

And I’m sure some will be fine with it and others may tell me they aren’t interested anymore.

Because you have to remember, there could be a long lasting issue between the neighbor's and you’re the poor guy in the middle.
80\20 rule. Never forget it.

80% of your business will come from 20% of your clients. Spend 80% of your time with the top 20%.

Tony
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
Location
LR
I always talk to the neighbor and get permission and always dead wood the tree and offer a light trim for free for allowing me easy access into the canopy,then I become there tree guy:numberone:I have learned as a tree guy we can make bad blood good blood with good good vibes!!!!sometimes I feel like more a psychiatrist then an arborist:ROFLMAO:but I love it!!!!!!!!
No. That is something to sell. I have no problem with dead that is on my way to my cuts, but climbing the whole canopy when we're only getting paid for me to access a quarter of it just isn't happening unless they've really made my life easier (maybe letting us open a fence for equipment access or something else of actual value).

It's very rare that a short conversation doesn't turn into another small check when I'm already going to be in the tree.


This thought is not quite on topic, but I had a guy hire us to take a large piece (20" diameter) of dead over the road across from where we were working last week.... after it was down and shoved out of the road, we discovered that it wasn't his tree. He does things to help out an old widow but doesn't communicate with her about it.
It was a tense situation for a moment, but now I will always think to ask if they own the tree.
We also ended up making an extra $150 to remove the debris and got a new client.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
Got a bad feeling about this job already that I have.

When I was there during the initial appointment I told the customer they would need to talk to neighbors and they said they didn’t need permission.

I sent them an email tonight explaining we would need permission if we have to climb because the tree is on the neighbor’s property. No response. Tried contacting them over the phone a couple times, no response either. I have no idea the history between these neighbors. What I do know is the feeling I got when talking in person.

But I have a feeling that my client is irritated with me because I’m trying to do the right thing and won’t just cut the branches, and I’m worried about them leaving a bad review or bashing my business because I won’t just do what they want even though it’s WRONG. So now it looks like they’re giving me silent treatment or just cutting me off.
Never be afraid to walk away. I have knocked on the neighbors door myself, and explained the situation. I’ve also looked the property owner up using our counties GIS data from the tax assessor
 
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oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Location
Alorgia
No. That is something to sell. I have no problem with dead that is on my way to my cuts, but climbing the whole canopy when we're only getting paid for me to access a quarter of it just isn't happening unless they've really made my life easier (maybe letting us open a fence for equipment access or something else of actual value).

It's very rare that a short conversation doesn't turn into another small check when I'm already going to be in the tree.


This thought is not quite on topic, but I had a guy hire us to take a large piece (20" diameter) of dead over the road across from where we were working last week.... after it was down and shoved out of the road, we discovered that it wasn't his tree. He does things to help out an old widow but doesn't communicate with her about it.
It was a tense situation for a moment, but now I will always think to ask if they own the tree.
We also ended up making an extra $150 to remove the debris and got a new client.
Let me guess...Water Oak.
 

Al_trees

New Member
Location
Connecticut
You don't have the time to call, email, meet or otherwise engage in contact with the neighbor.

I did this one time for someone and it was a total nightmare. After notifying them in writing, meeting in person, explaining the job three times, taking the time to move the trailer the neighbor kept under the tree I realized I could have completed an extra job in the sane time. After that I simply asked my customer if it was okay. Just recently a customer said "yes he said it is fine but can I give you my neighbor's number so you can call him before accessing from his property? He wants you to write some waivers or something in case anything happens to his driveway." Btw the driveway was a cracked piece of shit.

I simply told my client her neighbor was not my customer, I was not charging her enough to deal with him and we would not be accessing the job through his property or completing the work that required us to.

99% of the time it is as simple as asking your client if they spoke with the neighbor and if it is okay. Then provide a written estimate saying your client told you the neighbor agrees to you performing the work.
 

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