Today....

Njdelaney

Well-Known Member
I spent about three hours over the last two days making mistakes, learning from them and using gear and techniques I have never tried before. I'm fairly new to climbing and yesterday I got my climbing line, both throw bags and two steel biners stuck about 10' shy of the tippy top of this giant Mulberry in my back yard. I love this tree but normally hesitate to climb it because there are so many little snaggy branchlets everywhere that I worry about getting my throw line stuck. Last week I decided to give it a try and ended up hitting my crotch of choice on the very first throw so that made me a little cocky. Yesterday, I aimed a little higher in the tree and after about 30 attempts I hit what I would consider the highest safe TIP this tree has to offer. I got my 200' chunk of X-static up in to the crotch and back down to me, where I decided to double bag the rope and added two steel biners for extra weight. Then I made mistake #1; I detached my throw line from the rope, assuming that I had attached enough weight to the end that the rope would drop down into the spot I was trying to get it to fall into. Instead, it got wedged into a super tight union about 5 feet above and lateral to the crotch I was in. After an hour of trying to shake it loose, I gave up and went inside for the night. Today, I grabbed a 2lb clevis pin from a tractor and used that as a throw weight, hitting a crotch about 12' below and 25' lateral of the stuck spot. I ascended, tied in with my lanyard and unhooked my RR and advanced the TIP, which I did wrong twice before I got it oriented right finally. Hooked back in to the higher TIP and got out the Captain Hook for the first time. I moved out and up one of three leaders until I was close enough to reach the stuck bags with my Marvin pole pruner with all three sections and pulled the bags and biners back to me and then lowered that whole mess to the ground. I walked back to the main stem and descended down my shorter line to realize that I was about 6' shy of the ground because I had advanced the TIP(mistake #3). I ascended back up, lowered the TIP, and came down for good. Unhooked all the junk from the first line and it came out easy. Mistakes are the best teachers, and I knew I had enough gear on me to accomplish my task even if I effed up, which I did hahaha 20200402_165804.jpg
 
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Jemco

Well-Known Member
I find myself needing two outfits depending on whether I'm removing trees, or fine pruning them.

One outfit weighs twenty more pounds than the other.

Jemco
 

Winchman

Active Member
Thursday was a great day!!

I took another look at the big pine I said I hoped I'd never have to climb again. Lo and behold, the line coming down on the other side looked like a good climbing path, so I started the day with a fun seventy foot climb. I didn't even take the folding saw with me, just enjoying myself and hanging out for a while.

After that, I cut down a dead sixty foot pine in my neighbor's yard. The tree needed to fall close to a bird nest pole, so I cut it to lean against another tree, moved the truck, and brought it down right where I wanted it. There was no damage to the tree it leaned against. Then I cut it into three and six foot pieces my neighbor could deal with.

I know it's not recommended to create a hung-up leaner on purpose, but the pine was going to brush the other tree on the way down, and I knew I couldn't depend on the dead wood hinge to keep it from veering toward the pole on the way down. The arrangement of the limbs on both trees convinced me I could do what I did without serious damage, and it worked out well.

When I went to get permission to go into another neighbor's yard while working on the pine, I noticed she had several big loose dead limbs hung up in her oak trees, so I offered to take care of those for her. I spent a couple hours with the Big Shot and rope pulling down what I could and setting up lines for climbing in two trees to get the rest.

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So I've got two climbs and some cleanup planned for Friday.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
I live in a smalll off the grid community that is almost completely surrounded by State Parks ,and since the parks are close because of the covid I have been spending a lot of time hiking around in terrain I have never seen before. Today I found this 8-9 footer that has very old healing wounds from springboard notches and the beginnings of an undercut in it. For some reason the old timers walked away from it...Another tree right next to it also had springboard notches but no undercut...

IMG_1967.JPG IMG_1970.JPG
 

VenasNursery

Well-Known Member
I live in a smalll off the grid community that is almost completely surrounded by State Parks ,and since the parks are close because of the covid I have been spending a lot of time hiking around in terrain I have never seen before. Today I found this 8-9 footer that has very old healing wounds from springboard notches and the beginnings of an undercut in it. For some reason the old timers walked away from it...Another tree right next to it also had springboard notches but no undercut...

View attachment 66667 View attachment 66669
Really cool!!!!
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Who knows
That’s cool to see how the tree is healing. It would be interesting to know why they left it.
I will probably never figure out why they left this grove... As I said there are a few trees in the grove that have sprinboard notches in them, but this was the only one with the beginnings of an undercut... You can actually sight the undercut and see the uphill lay they were gonna hit. Obviously they were getting ready to slay this grove of 7-10 footer, but strangely pulled off the job... I myself am thankful they did.....
 

Jemco

Well-Known Member
Prodigious ungodly amount of sap flow?

I got bathed pretty good once removin a white fir.

Jemco
 

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