question about cabling

dspacio

Active Member
Location
Narragansett Bay
we had one of those windstorms last december, when i Knew "someone is about to call about a tree", and sure enough a friends neighbor called about a tall pine next to their house. a smaller one split and fell a bit further off and they were concerned.

I have helped from the ground with a lot of cabling but it was my first go in the tree. I did what @evo recommended, gave a low price so I would get the practice (and hope to talk up more work). I was interested in the rope Treeguard so got that all figured out. The tree actually split a few times, so i held the outward splits toward center and then back away from the house. None of the splits aim toward the house and it's the healthiest tree in their yard.

They didn't call about cabling, they just called out of concern that this thing would fall on their daughter. I suggested the cabling, and also removed 3 other marginal trees nearby, to give the big pine room to grow away from their house.

The Treeguard thing rings my bell as it's not piercing the tree. Just burly slings that get spliced to each other. Each sling can accept two connections. I only got about 3/5 of the way above the split, I could not throw my bag high enough! I was working at my TIP, with about 10 feet between each lead, it was waaay harder than I anticipated. Would have made a great Two Person Job. The hollow braid splice is easy, but making the second one, aiming to hold the connection tight while performing the splice was hard to do.

It was right around the winter solstice so I was working til sundown, dropping out with just enough light to pack up gear. I had a chosen splicing kit with me, it was fun to gear up with a different set of tools.

I recommend that Tree Guard line. got it from Wesspur. Future arborists won't have to work around a broken snakey wire when they remove these guys later. Especially for the pines.. that move and dance so much, it's great to think of how much more play comes with a rope than a cable.
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
Location
LR
we had one of those windstorms last december, when i Knew "someone is about to call about a tree", and sure enough a friends neighbor called about a tall pine next to their house. a smaller one split and fell a bit further off and they were concerned.

I have helped from the ground with a lot of cabling but it was my first go in the tree. I did what @evo recommended, gave a low price so I would get the practice (and hope to talk up more work). I was interested in the rope Treeguard so got that all figured out. The tree actually split a few times, so i held the outward splits toward center and then back away from the house. None of the splits aim toward the house and it's the healthiest tree in their yard.

They didn't call about cabling, they just called out of concern that this thing would fall on their daughter. I suggested the cabling, and also removed 3 other marginal trees nearby, to give the big pine room to grow away from their house.

The Treeguard thing rings my bell as it's not piercing the tree. Just burly slings that get spliced to each other. Each sling can accept two connections. I only got about 3/5 of the way above the split, I could not throw my bag high enough! I was working at my TIP, with about 10 feet between each lead, it was waaay harder than I anticipated. Would have made a great Two Person Job. The hollow braid splice is easy, but making the second one, aiming to hold the connection tight while performing the splice was hard to do.

It was right around the winter solstice so I was working til sundown, dropping out with just enough light to pack up gear. I had a chosen splicing kit with me, it was fun to gear up with a different set of tools.

I recommend that Tree Guard line. got it from Wesspur. Future arborists won't have to work around a broken snakey wire when they remove these guys later. Especially for the pines.. that move and dance so much, it's great to think of how much more play comes with a rope than a cable.
Do you have pictures?
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
we had one of those windstorms last december, when i Knew "someone is about to call about a tree", and sure enough a friends neighbor called about a tall pine next to their house. a smaller one split and fell a bit further off and they were concerned.

I have helped from the ground with a lot of cabling but it was my first go in the tree. I did what @evo recommended, gave a low price so I would get the practice (and hope to talk up more work). I was interested in the rope Treeguard so got that all figured out. The tree actually split a few times, so i held the outward splits toward center and then back away from the house. None of the splits aim toward the house and it's the healthiest tree in their yard.

They didn't call about cabling, they just called out of concern that this thing would fall on their daughter. I suggested the cabling, and also removed 3 other marginal trees nearby, to give the big pine room to grow away from their house.

The Treeguard thing rings my bell as it's not piercing the tree. Just burly slings that get spliced to each other. Each sling can accept two connections. I only got about 3/5 of the way above the split, I could not throw my bag high enough! I was working at my TIP, with about 10 feet between each lead, it was waaay harder than I anticipated. Would have made a great Two Person Job. The hollow braid splice is easy, but making the second one, aiming to hold the connection tight while performing the splice was hard to do.

It was right around the winter solstice so I was working til sundown, dropping out with just enough light to pack up gear. I had a chosen splicing kit with me, it was fun to gear up with a different set of tools.

I recommend that Tree Guard line. got it from Wesspur. Future arborists won't have to work around a broken snakey wire when they remove these guys later. Especially for the pines.. that move and dance so much, it's great to think of how much more play comes with a rope than a cable.

Pictures or it didn’t happen.

Pro tip. On your second splice, cut your rope (cable long) and waste some. Pull the rope to where it needs to be in tension through the second sling and mark the middle of the eye with tape. Now slacken the rope and splice yourself a big fat eye with slack though each pass and the burry.
Next take a Prussic cord and a secondary lanyard or pretty much anyhing you can make a z rig out of. Place it as far outside the splice as you can and anchor to the sling. Tension up and start working the slack

Remember dynamic needs to be a little slack and just under taught. Steel just taught and not tight (most of the time)

Personally I go with steel if there is a active crack or split. I think it is in the cobra literature that you are not suppose to use it with on a tree with a defect, just to support over extended limbs.
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
Location
LR
Pictures or it didn’t happen.

Pro tip. On your second splice, cut your rope (cable long) and waste some. Pull the rope to where it needs to be in tension through the second sling and mark the middle of the eye with tape. Now slacken the rope and splice yourself a big fat eye with slack though each pass and the burry.
Next take a Prussic cord and a secondary lanyard or pretty much anyhing you can make a z rig out of. Place it as far outside the splice as you can and anchor to the sling. Tension up and start working the slack

Remember dynamic needs to be a little slack and just under taught. Steel just taught and not tight (most of the time)

Personally I go with steel if there is a active crack or split. I think it is in the cobra literature that you are not suppose to use it with on a tree with a defect, just to support over extended limbs.
That last part was what I was really curious about. It sounds like dynamic cabling was installed where something static would have been optimal.
 

dspacio

Active Member
Location
Narragansett Bay
Do you have pictures?
I didn't get pictures! I remember bringing my phone up, but it turned to be an all-consuming process and I didn't come down with any.

thanks for the tip @evo , that sounds like a great plan.

Yes, this tree didn't have any defect, just some marginal looking unions (elongated bark ridge, possible included bark). With how much sway pines have, I felt like that bit of give would be good. They offer two kinda ropes, of different maximum elongation, I went with the more static one.
 

Jem4417

Well-Known Member
2/3 seems a little high especially if it’s to get bigger I agree with tom on bolts reduction and or dynamic cable. Steel cable at two thirds is gonna restrict the growth way too much
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
I didn't get pictures! I remember bringing my phone up, but it turned to be an all-consuming process and I didn't come down with any.

thanks for the tip @evo , that sounds like a great plan.

Yes, this tree didn't have any defect, just some marginal looking unions (elongated bark ridge, possible included bark). With how much sway pines have, I felt like that bit of give would be good. They offer two kinda ropes, of different maximum elongation, I went with the more static one.
Sounds good then... The static dynamic vs high elongation is often a moot point in a conifer (depending on the form). Stretch or elongation is often measured at x % of breaking strength per 100'. Often when cabling conifers there isn't enough room between the stems to do standard splices or if there is it's about 10'.. so in reality the difference in elongation is just a few inches if that.
In very short runs I've been known to splice a endless loop through the slings. I've even use long slings and joined the two stems with a shackle.
I do really like the versatility of Wesspurs dynamic cabling. You can even use steel cable non invasively..
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
2/3 seems a little high especially if it’s to get bigger I agree with tom on bolts reduction and or dynamic cable. Steel cable at two thirds is gonna restrict the growth way too much
It all depends on the tree... And even more so with conifers. I've had 2/3rd be 20-30" stems and I've had it at 4" stems.
I'm strongly opposed to height reduction on any conifer. Sometimes reducing one stem and leaving the other. Most of the time height reduction reaction is just like topping and creates future problems/a never ending maintenance nightmare.
A topped (or height reduced) doug fir will grow 40' + limbs (which tend to pop off), create hazard beam failures in regenerated tops, as well as just creating future co-dominate stems to fail.
 

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