Tree failure, while I was climbing it.

MikePowers321

Well-Known Member
Location
Leeds, Ny
I picture a situation where two high TIPs in adjacent trees are used to get you close to where you want to cut a tree that isn't safe to climb. You pull yourself over to the tree you want to cut, use a breakaway or QR'd lanyard to hold you there to make the cut. If things start to go south, QR the lanyard and swing out of the way. You might not want to use the lanyard for climbing, just for work positioning.

There are lots of different QR designs. We've got plenty of creative people on this forum that could come up with something very specific to working in trees.
This is a little breakaway lanyard I had put together for super sketchy trees. I had to flip one of the neodynemium magnets and countersink for them to attract properly. Breakaway at about 170lbs. Only use when tied into another healthy tree and clean up stubs if you ever swing back. The goal is to never have these magnets seperate for the rest of their life, and hopefully I never have to use them to be honest. They are strong so you can pretty much climb how you normally do without fear of separation. Still, must use great caution and be safe.
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LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
Location
Chatham Co.
Clever - I've not seen this idea floated before. Do you have any idea of how those magnets age? I.e., what effects are there over time on the force they're exerting, from being set up like this?

This is a little breakaway lanyard I had put together for super sketchy trees. I had to flip one of the neodynemium magnets and countersink for them to attract properly. Breakaway at about 170lbs. Only use when tied into another healthy tree and clean up stubs if you ever swing back. The goal is to never have these magnets seperate for the rest of their life, and hopefully I never have to use them to be honest. They are strong so you can pretty much climb how you normally do without fear of separation. Still, must use great caution and be safe.
View attachment 64945


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MikePowers321

Well-Known Member
Location
Leeds, Ny
Clever - I've not seen this idea floated before. Do you have any idea of how those magnets age? I.e., what effects are there over time on the force they're exerting, from being set up like this?
Good questions. From the ebay link:

PERMANENT STRENGTH - Neodymium is a kind of rare earth metal, it's suitable for making permanent & powerful magnets. This fishing magnet has permanent magnetism, it will be the same powerful even decades after.

I'd say just test before use. I hope never to use these : )
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
Location
LR
That is a great idea, but 170 is not enough. I'd rather need 3-400 pounds to separate them. That much won't squish you, but it's enough to really need some effort to break free.
I would bet I unintentionally put 200+ on my lanyard every few days for a second until I notice that it is stuck somewhere.
I know it's only on one side, but the force isn't evenly distributed most of the time.
 

MikePowers321

Well-Known Member
Location
Leeds, Ny
Do you think it might help to keep the two magnets from sliding apart, some kind of tube, or tape to prevent it.
Very difficult to slide apart as is, but if you look closely at the pictures of the magnets separated, you'll see that the head of one screw snaps perfectly into the countersunk portion of the other, pretty much locking them in place
 

MikePowers321

Well-Known Member
Location
Leeds, Ny
That is a great idea, but 170 is not enough. I'd rather need 3-400 pounds to separate them. That much won't squish you, but it's enough to really need some effort to break free.
I would bet I unintentionally put 200+ on my lanyard every few days for a second until I notice that it is stuck somewhere.
I know it's only on one side, but the force isn't evenly distributed most of the time.
Thats why I bought 350lb magnets originally, but after flipping them to attract, they lost a little holding power. However, after doing some testing, at 170, the earth magnets work nicely. You really have to slam into your lanyard with some serious force to get them to release. And if your climbing that sketchy of a tree, youre probably climbing very softly as it is. But a stronger magnet connection wouldn't be bad either.

I'll try to do a short video at some point to help visualize
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
With only one end of the lanyard detaching, there is a risk it could get stuck on a tight crotch, or whip around and smack you when it gets released.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
A splice instead of knot would be better but not a guarantee that it can’t get wedged or wrap around something after detaching.
A magnet on both sides would help, but only one might come loose causing a possibly of a high velocity missile. Putting half of the magnet on a separate lanyard attached to the tree would be one option.
3CD55FA0-597B-40C8-8AB0-6153D709BD83.jpeg
That’s one lanyard, is another needed when advancing the TIP on the suspect tree?
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
Why couldn't one just use magnets on both ends of the lanyard so the whole lanyard would go away from the climber with the failed tree portion. Nothing at all to get caught at that point.
It wouldn’t work like that. Inevitably one side would see slightly higher forces and part first leaving the other side still attached and free to whip.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
I think this magnet idea has solved the breakaway lanyard debate. One thought which would make it more secure is if one of the cups was a larger OD and a little deeper. This way one magnet would slip into a tube contacting the other. It wouldn’t need to go very deep to avoid any hangups when the do need to release
 

MikePowers321

Well-Known Member
Location
Leeds, Ny
It wouldn’t work like that. Inevitably one side would see slightly higher forces and part first leaving the other side still attached and free to whip.
I think he is addressing the idea of a magnet getting caught in a crotch after the magnets have already released due to a tree failure...similar to tying a knot onto their lanyard snaps which can snag in tight crotches at times.

Not something I would be too worried about myself but I see the issue.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Location
Evansville
In this video you can see Reg's solution to a breakaway, at least if I am seeing it correctly, clipping into an accessory loop on his harness.

 

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