Today....

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
I just got the Notch Fusion tether the other week and haven't had a chance to use it yet. Honestly I only got it because it was free with a purchase over $600 at TreeStuff so I figured why not try it out. Just need to find the time... The classic rope wrench setup is certainly the most customizable, the HH2 is the best for spar work because of it's compact size, but I end up using the ZZ/Chicane the most because for me at least it is just the easiest and most consistent, and on certain projects I do wind up shifting from SRT to DRT, and it really is the best setup for doing that. Mostly, I just like having a lot of options to pick from.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
It was a good looking tree too....

I've done plenty of rough ones like that, but usually not in such central/visible places, mostly out in the woods. Being a rural area, a lot of people out here can only get TV and sometimes internet (starting to get StarLink) through satellite dishes which obviously need a clear line of sight. They had a signal when they were installed, but 20 years of fir growth and people are losing their signals now, leading to a lot of 'do you top it or just remove it' decisions.
 

Mike Islander

Participating member
Climbed an actual tree with real gear for the first time today. Sequoia harness, RRP, foot and knee ascenders. Headed 20 feet up one of our magnolias and Silkyed off a limb. All the practice in my warehouse made it easy. Quite the contrast to climbing this same tree a couple months ago DRT (dDRT) with a marine rope, sitting in a Spanish bowline "saddle", which is what finally convinced me to learn how to climb safely.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
At the end of yesterday, I had over 2" in my rain gauge and luckily had taken the day off from cutting. Today was fantastic weather though and did major deadwood and end-weight (one side) of a few firs. First time using the Notch Fusion Rope Wrench Tether and I like it so far, played with different hitches in each tree trying to dial it in and will continue experimenting. I really need to buy a 7.5" Lawton Tether to play with, maybe next order.

(and yah, that dock is super jankey, had to bail out my skiff after the rain)

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Winchman

Branched out member
I finished up removing limbs from this 100-foot dead pine near the property line between two houses down the street.
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Working by myself (as usual), it took six climbs over four days. I used a speed line for most of the limbs, but used the truck to pull down a few smaller ones. I didn't see a higher TIP that I'd trust above my friction saver (red marks).
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The large limb (green) would likely get caught up in the other pine below it, so I left it alone.

The property owner will eventually get someone with a crane to remove the tree, but it won't be as much of a hazard or making as much of a mess until that happens.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
Called in for the scary stuff again, felling long dead firs before a fence is put in. Some rotten 100' trees, others 20-60' snags, so bad they are just tubes of bark. Had this third one go sideways on me actually, that was exciting.

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southsoundtree

Been here a while
Location
Olympia, WA
Tron, a long drill bit helps on those for assessing sound wood.

12" x 1/4" are easy to come by.


Winchman, you are very impressive.
What prevents simply cutting the top with a pull rope (as flat of line-angle as practical, if no lean into a dropzone), and chunking it down?

Cranes are needed in some situations, but that looks like open ground in front.
 

Winchman

Branched out member
Tron, a long drill bit helps on those for assessing sound wood.

12" x 1/4" are easy to come by.


Winchman, you are very impressive.
What prevents simply cutting the top with a pull rope (as flat of line-angle as practical, if no lean into a dropzone), and chunking it down?

Cranes are needed in some situations, but that looks like open ground in front.
You're correct. There's plenty of room to top and chunk the tree, but with my climbing rig and no spikes, I can't do much above my TIP. Cutting the tree below my TIP with a chainsaw seemed much too risky. I used a razor hand saw for all the cutting I did.

As it turns out, the homeowner called just now to tell me a guy with a crane was finishing a job nearby early, and he was coming later this afternoon to take the tree down. It's funny how things work out. I'm glad I got a chance to play in the tree, and I'm happy it's being taken care of by a pro outfit so soon. Good all around.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
Tron, a long drill bit helps on those for assessing sound wood.

Yah, when I'm out in the woods as these were, I just do a vertical bore-cut above where I'd want the face, that does a good job of telling me what's inside. On those totally rotten 'bark tube' snags, I knew what they were going to be like just from looking at the outside. The one that went wrong on me had a bunch of cedar limbs pressing on it making it hard to tell what was going on in terms of lean/pressure. No targets near by (other than myself) and I knew it was a risk, so when I saw it going bad I was ready and able to get out of the way.
 

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