Rope runner pro

Thatonedude

New Member
Location
Keyser
Que? MJ had an extra tendon?
No wasn’t really focused around that. Just the fact that if you wanted to jump higher you would need one. Without having to do anything. All under the assumption you are just getting an extra tendon with no healing time and getting right back at it. Without practicing or doing anything towards that other than just the fact you wanted to do something different than what you were doing before.
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Location
Buffalo
Poppycock, I say!
He who dies with the most toys wins.

Actually the climbing gear addiction really got rolling after I got clean from dope. Coincidence? I think we all know the answer to that. Maybe.
 

dmonn

Well-Known Member
Location
Mequon
Many of the devices I listed are available at any decent arborist supply store (excluding the BDB). Hell I was at janky little local small engine/saw shop this weekend and they had Zigzag's, footies, and Haas knee ascenders hanging on the wall behind the front counter...I also think you would be hard pressed to find a legit outfit that isn't using at least one of those devices on a regular basis....I believe more of us have left the cave, are walking upright, and cooking with fire than you think.
I miss those days in the caves. Fun times!
 

Grafted_In

Active Member
Location
Hawai'i
"Look with your eyes not your mouth." I was taught to try and look for answers myself before asking someone else. If I didn't know what a word meant, my grandma would tell me to look it up. My brother couldn't ask John Prine how to play guitar or write songs like him but he could listen and observe. I couldn't ask my favorite athletes how they did a certain maneuver but I could watch and learn. Just beause my mouth was shut more often than not, didn't mean I wasn't questioning the world around me. I learned to think for myself and develop my critical thinking skills. If I really got stumped then yes, I asked questions from the old timers and those with more experience. They could tell that I had put time into whatever it was I was asking about. They were usually more inclined to help me out too!

I could argue that todays generation is actually worse at thinking critically and used to answers being handed to them. With tools like Google and Youtube, it's easier to not put so much effort into figuring something out. But don't take that as me saying those aren't valuable tools because they are! The Buzz included...

It's easier to listen when our mouths are shut. If we can take a little more time here and there to observe, we might be able to answer our questions.

Also, take some time. Lots of time. Read through the older forums...I've found a lot of answers by diving deep...
 

Thatonedude

New Member
Location
Keyser
"Look with your eyes not your mouth." I was taught to try and look for answers myself before asking someone else. If I didn't know what a word meant, my grandma would tell me to look it up. My brother couldn't ask John Prine how to play guitar or write songs like him but he could listen and observe. I couldn't ask my favorite athletes how they did a certain maneuver but I could watch and learn. Just beause my mouth was shut more often than not, didn't mean I wasn't questioning the world around me. I learned to think for myself and develop my critical thinking skills. If I really got stumped then yes, I asked questions from the old timers and those with more experience. They could tell that I had put time into whatever it was I was asking about. They were usually more inclined to help me out too!

I could argue that todays generation is actually worse at thinking critically and used to answers being handed to them. With tools like Google and Youtube, it's easier to not put so much effort into figuring something out. But don't take that as me saying those aren't valuable tools because they are! The Buzz included...

It's easier to listen when our mouths are shut. If we can take a little more time here and there to observe, we might be able to answer our questions.

Also, take some time. Lots of time. Read through the older forums...I've found a lot of answers by diving deep...
That’s a nice perspective on how you learn. I’m a hands on guy. You can show me a millions times, until I have that piece in my hands working on it, looking at it. I don’t understand it, was in the fire service for 7 years. So critical thinking and being put on the spot is something I don’t mind doing. Trying to find different ways to process a stressful problem is what I like to do.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
@Crimsonking
You called?
Tieing in a second time with rope from your tail is always available for controlling lateral movements in treetops. Coming back to plumb on an original anchor is done by 'draggin' tail. A second device can be used, a closed Blake's hitch mrs, a pulley or plain biner or even just hand friction on a bight tucked over a limb can work. Simple.

Two ropes can be very rad to climb around on. I like towing a 2nd system up on ascent, throwing it around to get movement to the work or support more of my weight or stack on each other like secret weapon or canobase techniques. Rope to tie more stuff together can solve a lot of problems up there.
 

Thatonedude

New Member
Location
Keyser
@Crimsonking
You called?
Tieing in a second time with rope from your tail is always available for controlling lateral movements in treetops. Coming back to plumb on an original anchor is done by 'draggin' tail. A second device can be used, a closed Blake's hitch mrs, a pulley or plain biner or even just hand friction on a bight tucked over a limb can work. Simple.

Two ropes can be very rad to climb around on. I like towing a 2nd system up on ascent, throwing it around to get movement to the work or support more of my weight or stack on each other like secret weapon or canobase techniques. Rope to tie more stuff together can solve a lot of problems up there.
I’ve just been overthinking it and not realizing the full potential of one climb line. Used a second set up in a tree today, and like I said I was just overthinking the whole situation. Thanks for the advice.
 

Dan Cobb

Well-Known Member
Location
Hoover
I miss those days in the caves. Fun times!
Where all did you cave? Sounds like you gave up caving. I've done most of my caving in TAG, but we often attend the NSS conventions, so have caved a little bit all over. Found out last week they canceled this year's convention in Weed, CA; wife is severely disappointed. Have a 3.3 mile long cave 15 minutes from the house, but typically drive a couple of hours to get to some prime caves.
 

dmonn

Well-Known Member
Location
Mequon
I used to live in the St. Louis area and did a ton of caving until I had kids. Then the time with the kids made caving less desirable. I rekindled my interest for a while when the kids got a little older and they'd come along, but then moved to Wisconsin when they were both out of high school. Not too many caves in Wisconsin.

At the time I was living in the St. Louis area, Missouri had about 5000 caves in the cave catalogue. I did most of my caving in the SE part of Missouri. There were four caves there where each cave had over 10 miles of mapped passage, two of them over 25 miles. I also did some caving in the SW part of the state, and cave diving in the south central part of the state and north central Arkansas. One cave in St. Louis County was a fun squeeze-through entrance then 110 ft rappel, most of it without touching any walls. The NSS and regional conventions were always a fun time. I miss those times, but right now I have lots of ways to have fun, and God only made 24 hours in a day!
 

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