Lanyard adjuster

Talon Tree Service

Active Member
Location
Bargersville
I love my Art positioner. Zillon is smoother but is lengthier and more seemed more fragile. I haven’t climbed on one much. If you do wear out the rope the zillon comes with you can attach any rope you want as long as it has one end open. Which isn’t a big deal for me since I tie a knot on my snap anyways
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
I’ve gone from an old school buckstrap to a Buckadjuster to a Trango Cinch to a Grillon.

I have zero complaints about the Grillon. Super robust, smooth, adjusts under load well. May be able to find one used fairly cheap. (I think they’re a bit overpriced new). If buying new I’d probably go with the Positioner based on reputation alone. But I’ll bet the Grillon lasts longer. Very simple mechanism, will last almost forever.
I am not an everyday climber...but I just replaced the cam on my Positioner (original one, not Positioner 2 if that tells you how old it is, but used Positioner 2 cam). Pretty sure I've had it for about 10 years. That repair cost me $25. I don't know how much longer lasting I can expect and how much easier/cheaper a repair can be.
 

Jan_

Well-Known Member
You should try it, but you should know that the grigri can handle 11mm rope max. I once rappeled down a cliff on puffy 11mm rope with the grigri, it would barely let me descent.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
It’s called the Sticht hitch. A small ring is used on smaller cords and rope. A large ring would probably work best on 10mm cords and 11mm+ ropes. Positioning the ring up or down controls the tension of the wraps. A pulley isn’t necessary and can be replaced with a short, double eye strap for more compactness and for smoother tending.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
There’s been many suggestions for mechanicals, how about a different hitch. Works with moving or stationary systems.
View attachment 58939
Thank you Brocky for the inspiration! I like it a lot.

This is an ideal alternative to a mechanical rope grab, especially from a minimalist perspective. I'll use a 5 wrap, with a cross-over in place of what looks like your overhand knot behind the ring, as shown below on my 30' lanyard. Here's the front and back view to show more detail.

brockishhitch.jpg
 
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Maybe this angle is worth mentioning. On conifers anyway, I've kinda defaulted to using a Petzl Micrograb, not so much because it's smoother or anything than either a hitch/ micropulley or other mechanical but because it's easier to clean sap/ pitch out of. I like the zillon but I've had a harder time getting it de-pitched (to be fair - on the line that it comes with, so you can't pull the lanyard line right out to clean everything). Easy to clean is big thing with me, because we do a bunch of conifer work (and I don't like doing the dishes). Buckgrab is kinda the same - easier to clean up. So I often climb with one hitch based long climbing lanyard (usually a long CE lanyard) and one shorter one with the micrograb. At least one of them is not glued immovable at the end of the day. If dismantling, a wire core lanyard is my go to - same thing the rope grab is easy to clean up. How's the positioner to clean/ howz it do with sap/ pitch?
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
Positioner is not hard, but a bit annoying to take off of the rope to clean. Once off would be very easy to clean.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
Thank you Brocky for the inspiration! I like it a lot.

This is an ideal alternative to a mechanical rope grab, especially from a minimalist perspective. I'll use a 5 wrap, with a cross-over in place of what looks like your overhand knot behind the ring, as shown below on my 30' lanyard. Here's the front and back view to show more detail.

View attachment 58942

Not quite right, the braid in back needs to be a twist. The way you show might work, but I think after a few cycles of up and down it will start to tighten up. The hitch on the right shows the twist before the eyes are put through the ring. Another tip is it needs firm cord that stays round.
58946
The overhand works best stretched out a bit, so an oval works best with that hitch. This one is much easier to tie and adjust.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Not quite right, the braid in back needs to be a twist. The way you show might work, but I think after a few cycles of up and down it will start to tighten up. The hitch on the right shows the twist before the eyes are put through the ring. Another tip is it needs firm cord that stays round.
View attachment 58946
The overhand works best stretched out a bit, so an oval works best with that hitch. This one is much easier to tie and adjust.
I hear you and I'll play around with it some more, but here's my take on it so far, using 8mm RIT and uncrossing one of the two crosses. I think you're right that it'll eventually bind on SRS, but for MRS it should be fine, as it's not much different with a micro pulley, except for the ring being integrated into the knot itself.

brockishhitch2.jpg

Here's your version with the added twist inside the ring.

58948
 
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Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
As for pitch, I gummed my positioner its first day in the field. To clean it I just put all my weight on my lanyard and let it feed to let the rope scrape the pitch off. Problem solved. It has much less surface area than the grigri, rad, or grillon, so it’s easier to “burn” off the mess.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Is this for lanyard or climbing/primary hitch? Both???
Lanyard yes. MRS yes, but not as well without a hitch tending pulley. SRS is probably pushing the envelop a bit, but I bet it runs pretty well with a Rope Wrench. Depending on the climber-hitch cord-climbing rope variables, I may be overly optimistic, but for some it may even perform like a simplified Hitch Hiker, at a fraction of the cost.
 
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