If I were a tree, I’d be a...

evo

Been here a while
Location
My Island, WA
Was your pops old school?

Old school certainly I came along when he was in his early 50’s. PNW logger for the bulk of his life and was more at home in the forest.. He started working in the woods a 8 years old, to escape his abusive family (ironically it was the safer choice to work with them men in the early 40’s)..
He hired a guy when I was about 6-7 for some view pruning. He saw how mesmerized I was, so he gave me a stern lecture of how insanely dangerous climbing was and how he rather see me do anything besides that..
He taught me how to work, and some important basics. Never stand in a bight, never wrap rope around any part of your body, never let cable run though your hands. All with graphic detail of first hand experience with observation.

He lost a good friend when a jagger pierced his hand (always wear cotton gloves vs leather was another lecture. You have a higher chance of feeling the jagger and flipping the glove off. Leather you can’t feel it until it has enough force to puncture the leather, thus pierce your hand). He was hoisted up the main line before his hand let go, to fall on the log deck.
 
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oceans

Been here a while
Location
RI
Old school certainly I came along when he was in his early 50’s. PNW logger for the bulk of his life and was more at home in the forest.. He started working in the woods a 8 years old, to escape his abusive family (ironically it was the safer choice to work with them men in the early 40’s)..
He hired a guy when I was about 6-7 for some view pruning. He saw how mesmerized I was, so he gave me a stern lecture of how insanely dangerous climbing was and how he rather see me do anything besides that..
He taught me how to work, and some important basics. Never stand in a bight, never wrap rope around any part of your body, never let cable run though your hands. All with graphic detail of first hand experience with observation.

He lost a good friend when a jagger pierced his hand (always wear cotton gloves vs leather was another lecture. You have a higher chance of feeling the jagger and flipping the glove off. Leather you can’t feel it until it has enough force to puncture the leather, thus pierce your hand). He was hoisted up the main line before his hand let go, to fall on the log deck.
So Pops is definitely a Redwood?
 

oceans

Been here a while
Location
RI
Nahh Sitka Spruce all the way. Actually one of his favorite trees
It’s funny, because I was pretty sure you were above the normal Redwood range. Call me stereotypical that is was the first species I thought of for the west coast.

What else are your really common trees out there?
 

evo

Been here a while
Location
My Island, WA
It’s funny, because I was pretty sure you were above the normal Redwood range. Call me stereotypical that is was the first species I thought of for the west coast.

What else are your really common trees out there?
Much more diverse than people realize. Our lowland climax forest is primarily Sitka spruce (almost all logged off), western red cedar, hemlock. Interestingly enough Doug fir is a sun loving species and more of a pioneer specie. But we have plenty of them in our natural oldgrowth stands.
Red alder, about a dozen willows, vine maple, big leaf maple, cotton wood, cascara, service berry, Garry oak, shore/lodge pole, madrone, grand fir and a speckling of a few other true firs, pacific yew.
That’s about it for the primaries on the Whidbey, but as a correction we have no native vine maple.

The islands and puget sound is very unique and diverse and unique. We have a few niche pockets of plants that don’t occur for hundreds of miles around us. Juniper mariatima (our own very distinct specie with a tiny niche range), a little manzanita, prickly pear cacti.
The Olympic peninsula/mountain are off the hook too.. to many species to count and elevation dependant. It’s really not this extreme but it’s nearly like the mountains rise out of the sea to 14’000 (off the top of my head guess).
Now SW Oregon is where shit gets crazy diverse!
 

oceans

Been here a while
Location
RI
Much more diverse than people realize. Our lowland climax forest is primarily Sitka spruce (almost all logged off), western red cedar, hemlock. Interestingly enough Doug fir is a sun loving species and more of a pioneer specie. But we have plenty of them in our natural oldgrowth stands.
Red alder, about a dozen willows, vine maple, big leaf maple, cotton wood, cascara, service berry, Garry oak, shore/lodge pole, madrone, grand fir and a speckling of a few other true firs, pacific yew.
That’s about it for the primaries on the Whidbey, but as a correction we have no native vine maple.

The islands and puget sound is very unique and diverse and unique. We have a few niche pockets of plants that don’t occur for hundreds of miles around us. Juniper mariatima (our own very distinct specie with a tiny niche range), a little manzanita, prickly pear cacti.
The Olympic peninsula/mountain are off the hook too.. to many species to count and elevation dependant. It’s really not this extreme but it’s nearly like the mountains rise out of the sea to 14’000 (off the top of my head guess).
Now SW Oregon is where shit gets crazy diverse!
Thanks for making that post, evo. Most of those species I’ve only ever heard of. It sounds amazing. We’re in a tiny microclimate on the east coast too. Buzzards Bay has its own pockets of plants that can’t do very well just a few miles outside our area.

Also, Ive heard about the Olympics, and they intrigue me to no end. I have yet to spend a good amount of time out there, but the day will come!
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
Location
Barbados
Much more diverse than people realize. Our lowland climax forest is primarily Sitka spruce (almost all logged off), western red cedar, hemlock. Interestingly enough Doug fir is a sun loving species and more of a pioneer specie. But we have plenty of them in our natural oldgrowth stands.
Red alder, about a dozen willows, vine maple, big leaf maple, cotton wood, cascara, service berry, Garry oak, shore/lodge pole, madrone, grand fir and a speckling of a few other true firs, pacific yew.
That’s about it for the primaries on the Whidbey, but as a correction we have no native vine maple.

The islands and puget sound is very unique and diverse and unique. We have a few niche pockets of plants that don’t occur for hundreds of miles around us. Juniper mariatima (our own very distinct specie with a tiny niche range), a little manzanita, prickly pear cacti.
The Olympic peninsula/mountain are off the hook too.. to many species to count and elevation dependant. It’s really not this extreme but it’s nearly like the mountains rise out of the sea to 14’000 (off the top of my head guess).
Now SW Oregon is where shit gets crazy diverse!
Sounds super cool.
 
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evo

Been here a while
Location
My Island, WA
Thanks for making that post, evo. Most of those species I’ve only ever heard of. It sounds amazing. We’re in a tiny microclimate on the east coast too. Buzzards Bay has its own pockets of plants that can’t do very well just a few miles outside our area.

Also, Ive heard about the Olympics, and they intrigue me to no end. I have yet to spend a good amount of time out there, but the day will come!
Let me know when you do, there are some truly magical spots and I can even show you some. The photo in my avatar is a douglas fir. Far from the form most think of. Interestingly enough most of eastern washington and oregon flooded out to the formation of ice dams during the last ice age. I think it was about 11 times the dam formed? Then most of eastern WA, central north to center west was the largest known lava flow which dumped out into the sea. We have our own gingko petrified forest, painted desert, on and on... Certainly home to me.
 
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