If I were a tree, I’d be a...

Brando CalPankian

Participating member
Location
Washington
Much more diverse than people realize. Our lowland climax forest is primarily Sitka spruce (almost all logged off), western red cedar, hemlock. Interestingly enough Doug fir is a sun loving species and more of a pioneer specie. But we have plenty of them in our natural oldgrowth stands.
Red alder, about a dozen willows, vine maple, big leaf maple, cotton wood, cascara, service berry, Garry oak, shore/lodge pole, madrone, grand fir and a speckling of a few other true firs, pacific yew.
That’s about it for the primaries on the Whidbey, but as a correction we have no native vine maple.

The islands and puget sound is very unique and diverse and unique. We have a few niche pockets of plants that don’t occur for hundreds of miles around us. Juniper mariatima (our own very distinct specie with a tiny niche range), a little manzanita, prickly pear cacti.
The Olympic peninsula/mountain are off the hook too.. to many species to count and elevation dependant. It’s really not this extreme but it’s nearly like the mountains rise out of the sea to 14’000 (off the top of my head guess).
Now SW Oregon is where shit gets crazy diverse!
I love it here (tip of the penninsula). Hope to come visit your island!
 
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oceans

Been here a while
Location
MA, USA
Let me know when you do, there are some truly magical spots and I can even show you some. The photo in my avatar is a douglas fir. Far from the form most think of. Interestingly enough most of eastern washington and oregon flooded out to the formation of ice dams during the last ice age. I think it was about 11 times the dam formed? Then most of eastern WA, central north to center west was the largest known lava flow which dumped out into the sea. We have our own gingko petrified forest, painted desert, on and on... Certainly home to me.
Simply...WOW! I’ll take you up on that for sure. Thanks!
 

oceans

Been here a while
Location
MA, USA
Let me know when you do, there are some truly magical spots and I can even show you some. The photo in my avatar is a douglas fir. Far from the form most think of. Interestingly enough most of eastern washington and oregon flooded out to the formation of ice dams during the last ice age. I think it was about 11 times the dam formed? Then most of eastern WA, central north to center west was the largest known lava flow which dumped out into the sea. We have our own gingko petrified forest, painted desert, on and on... Certainly home to me.
I work with a gent (eating lunch together right now) who was stationed in Forks. Left the CG and picked up work with Dahlgren. He’s backing up everything you’ve said. Very small world stuff going on here right now. He knows quite a bit about Whidbey.
 
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evo

Been here a while
Location
My Island, WA
I work with a gent (eating lunch together right now) who was stationed in Forks. Left the CG and picked up work with Dahlgren. He’s backing up everything you’ve said. Very small world stuff going on here right now. He knows quite a bit about Whidbey.
Does he want a job?
 

Bendroctanus

Participating member
Location
Springfield
Celtis occidentalis - may seem hollow but strong as brick barn nonetheless. You think they’re the first to fall apart but they’re the last in a storm. They choose when. Abrasive in some ways but mostly agreeable. Lots of options and just an all around fun tree that definitely fills out the space.
 
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