Help me save a 200+ year old specimen beech.

jbrukardt

New Member
I would go to the ISA and ASCA websites and search for BCMAs or RCAs in your area as well as asking around for the best tree care companies in your state. This tree needs some very specific work done to it with proper follow up care.
Michael Galvin is local, and was recommended earlier, but im not sure I am exactly important enough for his time.

Both the previous gentlemen i have had out are ISA certified and showed up in the lists
  • ISA Certified Arborist®
  • ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification
However, the closest BCMA is about 50 miles out.
 

jbrukardt

New Member
Mrtree posted a few names earlier you should look into.
Yep, Mr. Galvin was definitely the highlight there. Just a matter of warranting his level of expertise, as this isnt a champion tree of any sort. Ill try to reach out again to the SavATree group and see if i have better luck.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Never hurts to ask. It qualifies as a veteran tree under duress that needs proper attentive care.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
And forward good candidates your summaries, pictures, and soil test info like you've done here.
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
This is Sylvia, the "S" in DSMc.

Standard protocol is not to fertilize a stressed tree. The amount of development and change around this tree in the last few years is extensive. Those changes need to be considered. The tree itself has been growing in this native soil, with its low pH and low nutrient level, for a very long time. What suddenly changed? Add in those factors.

Plus, why is this tree the only tree apparently affected? In the post damage photo the original poster gave us, you see many trees apparently NOT affected. Why is that?

The American Beech has a heart-shape root system, some go deep, some stay shallow. The shallow root system tends to be dense and fibrous. I would NOT air spade this tree in the only area that has perhaps NOT been disturbed.

A very good idea is to get someone on site who has the expertise and ability to look not only at the tree, but the soil as well, including drainage patterns and characteristics (not just nutrient level). Who can look out beyond the canopy (the roots don't stop there).
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Excellent points. I would also want to see a foliar nutrient test for comparison to the soil. Particularly for low Ca, Mg, and Mn.
Also wondering if this region has been exposed to acid deposition and other forms of pollution. K Smith has published on this subject in the east and north east.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
When was that house built?
The first thing to do is to get clear on the root LOSS, not 'damage'. Pics show a huge amount of root loss.

Good move leaving the company that pushes N fert; unconscionable.
Mycorrhizal material may well be good to apply; unlike N, no harm in trying that.
Drainage patterns key to look at and mitigate via deep aeration where possible.

I'll be in Mt. Rainier near DC next month; check website if you'd like an estimate.
 

jbrukardt

New Member
When was that house built?
The first thing to do is to get clear on the root LOSS, not 'damage'. Pics show a huge amount of root loss.

Good move leaving the company that pushes N fert; unconscionable.
Mycorrhizal material may well be good to apply; unlike N, no harm in trying that.
Drainage patterns key to look at and mitigate via deep aeration where possible.

I'll be in Mt. Rainier near DC next month; check website if you'd like an estimate.
Thank you Guy, I may take you up on that. Mt Rainer is about 40 minutes west of me.

Ill take a look at the website when i get off work.

The house was built in 1925.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Too much of a good thing is not a good thing. Sounds like this tree needs a miracle. Air spading that entire root system may not be the best thing for the treet. I would think radial trenching would be a safer alternative.


You could try the tree Whisperer if you like. I can put you in touch with him
 
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