Granberg Alaskan Mill - what to start with?

dspacio

Active Member
Location
Narragansett Bay
those old pictures are awesome


really, im thinking a 60hp tractor with one of those logging winches, would be great, my dad wants a backhoe, maybe we could make some adaptor to work on that? although im 99% sure a backhoe is NOT made for pulling like a tractor is

dozer is also an option, but he is one of "Those dads" that doesnt want the yard messed up lol, even tho our soil is like magic, doesnt matter the damage, itll grow back in a month or less
thanks, my great-grandmother took hundreds, it's treasure.

that krpan winch blew my mind. it runs off the PTO. the tractor we were using was the smallest they recommended (old ford, forget the size) and it was so wonderful to work.
still good to be mindful of compaction. I have done a good bit of farming so I am kind of hyper about soil conditions.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
do you think its worth having to drag the tree, or logs all the way to the mill? my family is looking to buy around 100 acres, and mill allot, but, we are trying to decide if its worth the expense of a woodmizer, and the trouble of moving trees, or if the alaskan mill is better

I say get the woodmized, but my dad is on the fence about it

Clueless!
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
thats a huge thing my dad is always concerned about, he doesnt even like mowing with out small tractor (only about 3k) since it compacts so much, my zeroturn does great, even for dragging small trees lol
RE if it's worth dragging to the mill/vs Alaska mill in place... Depends on volume, BUT you still have to drag the boards out. Likely more in and out trips than just dragging the log out.
100 acres, and you will likely be tearing shit up regardless...
A small skidder or tracked machine will have a light footprint, but a legit wheeled skidder with a winch will be the lowest impact on soil.
A wheeled articulated loader can be smaller and more maneuverable for sustainable logging in tight quarters.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
what do you think of a bobcat? we want a mini ex but I know that wont be great for skidding logs at all
heck, if I can find one for cheap Im thinking avant, but I doubt I will find one in our price range
Not the best. But what kind of volume/lengths are you looking at? I’m envisioning you are wanting at least 12’ logs.
A skid steer has all the weight in the rear of the machine to counter balance the loader in front. Skidding logs, by the nature of it is dragging them. That is a lot of reverse in a machine that has shit rear visibility.
A 100 acres and you guys will likely want some sort of machine, I wouldn’t think you’d be milling enough to warrant a purpose built skidder. Maybe a tractor and a farmi is a good option, or a smaller dozer. You are going to have to think. Either you are dragging them out head first and backing to the logs, or off the front and pulling the logs. Neither makes sense with a skidsteer
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
what part exactly? you have a history of trying to piss me off over nothing, if you have nothing better to do then shut up and dont talk to me or reply to my threads

end of conversation
So you are inquiring as to whether an Alaskan mill would be a better option for milling than a Woodmizer bandsaw mill. No offense, but that is about as clueless as it gets and a strong indication that you guys have no clue as to what you are getting into..

I would strongly suggest that you and your dad spend some serious time with local folks who are doing what you plan on doing... Learn from others before jumping into this endeavor.

Do you have a clue how the fall timber, and buck logs to yield the most board footage? Do you have a clue how to most efficiently skid logs, while causing the least impact on the land? Do you have a clue how to properly break down a log when milling to create the best lumber with the highest yield? These are just some of the things you and your dad MUST know, or the learning curve is gonna be very steep and very expensive.


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rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
didnt think about the visibility

probably gonna be mostly 8ft logs, but I know if I get something that wont do bigger I will get annoyed/mad really fast
im in the smokey mountains, and I have allot of super steep hills, im thinking dozer is the way to go, something like an old D6 with a winch, although a D6 is a little on the large side, but you gotta think, the logs we will be moving are gonna do more damage to the ground than most equipment will
A fucking D6 for 8ft logs. Thanks for the laugh son!
 
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27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
No offense treesap, but rico is totally right here. Wondering if you should get an Alaskan mill or Woodmizer for what you are describing is like saying you have a 20 mile commute and wondering if you should get a Razr Scooter or a BMW.

You won't be, and don't need to be an expert from day one, but if you are serious about this you really do need to chat with and see, even work with, other people milling in your area to understand the tools and methods. It is a process that involves a lot of different skills and planning. If you start off on totally the wrong foot, you will just be wasting time, energy and money. I think you have the mind and ability to do it, you just need to listen to what people are telling you and be pointed in the right direction.
 
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rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
if im getting into milling for anything more than like 5 trees, im not pulling 8ft logs across 100 acres, itll be more like half the tree, whatever I can weave down trails

sorry for being a complete moron, sorry for not knowing every little thing about milling, im sorry for even joining this forum

goodbye

also, @rico please explain why you keep replying to my posts, it cost you nothing to not talk to me
As long as you keep running your mouth concerning things you have zero experience and knowledge about, I am gonna continue setting you straight. I encourage you, as well as everyone else, to read this thread from beginning to end..You have gone from blowing up a toy saw while using an alaskan mill, to a 100 acre parcel, harvesting timber, milling lumber, and skidding with a fucking D6. Nonsense from beginning to end.
 

Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
The land of milling timber is filled with many dreamers and few professionals. There’s some good advice here and you need to hear it.

I’d recommend contacting a logging company and pricing out their services versus investing in equipment you will only use a little bit. You will likely save money and get a much much better product in the end.
 

metaspencer

Active Member
Location
Urbana, IL
As long as you keep running your mouth concerning things you have zero experience and knowledge about, I am gonna continue setting you straight. I encourage you, as well as everyone else, to read this thread from beginning to end..You have gone from blowing up a toy saw while using an alaskan mill, to a 100 acre parcel, harvesting timber, milling lumber, and skidding with a fucking D6. Nonsense from beginning to end.
Hey Rico -- sounds like you have some hostility toward a young man who is ambitiously interested in the profession. I've seen a wide array of engaging posts from "Treesap" and have a clear sense that encouragement and mentoring would be favorable to bashing and criticism.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Many times mentors share their wisdom in a harsh and heavy way. A good mentor won't want you to get hurt, not just physically either, so they might sound brash and harsh. Listen...get a thick skin...ignore what you want.

It's not realistic to mill much wood with a chainsaw mill. They have their place though.

Like I said earlier there are many used bandmills for sale with manual controls that would make much more lumber faster, easier and cheaper. Better yet, do the logging and get the logs to a deck. Then find a sawyer with a portable mill to make lumber. Much easier solution.

I follow a guy who has a portable mill on Facebook...look for Log to Lumber. If you want to see a really amazing sawyer look for Logs to Lumber here in Minnesota. He's milled for me and is amazing. Browse his catalog.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
So you are inquiring as to whether an Alaskan mill would be a better option for milling than a Woodmizer bandsaw mill. No offense, but that is about as clueless as it gets and a strong indication that you guys have no clue as to what you are getting into..

I would strongly suggest that you and your dad spend some serious time with local folks who are doing what you plan on doing... Learn from others before jumping into this endeavor.

Do you have a clue how the fall timber, and buck logs to yield the most board footage? Do you have a clue how to most efficiently skid logs, while causing the least impact on the land? Do you have a clue how to properly break down a log when milling to create the best lumber with the highest yield? These are just some of the things you and your dad MUST know, or the learning curve is gonna be very steep and very expensive.


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you're cute when you get all passionate. I'm curious on how much they intend on doing on 100' acres, and if an Alaska mill isn't such a bad idea, good production equipment is very different from someone who wants to make a tool shed with pops..

Edit: I have now actually read the the entire thread to this point...
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
you're cute when you get all passionate. I'm curious on how much they intend on doing on 100' acres, and if an Alaska mill isn't such a bad idea, good production equipment is very different from someone who wants to make a tool shed with pops..
Well he did say they wanted to do "mill allot", then followed it up saying it was "like 5 trees". He also wants to mill with an Alaskan mill yet he needs a fucking D6 to skid logs? He says his father wasn't keen on the idea of a Woodmizer bandsaw mill, then all of the sudden his father wants to put in on a concrete slab and build a roof for it? Kid talks in circles, and I can smell the bullshit from all the way out here on the west coast.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Hey Rico -- sounds like you have some hostility toward a young man who is ambitiously interested in the profession. I've seen a wide array of engaging posts from "Treesap" and have a clear sense that encouragement and mentoring would be favorable to bashing and criticism.
Gosh Meta, I believe that in my own special sort of way I suggested that this kid and his father were woefully unprepared to start harvesting timber and milling lumber..I believe I also suggested that they really needed to go spent some serious time around folks who actually do this sort of thing for a living...Hell, I even gave them some hints on the sort of stuff they really needed to know before they started throwing a bunch of money down the drain...You know, the basic shit like actually knowing how to properly fall and buck timber, skid logs, and mill clean straight lumber....

If you have any wisdom to share concerning harvesting timber, skidding, and milling we would all love to hear it..
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
So you are inquiring as to whether an Alaskan mill would be a better option for milling than a Woodmizer bandsaw mill. No offense, but that is about as clueless as it gets and a strong indication that you guys have no clue as to what you are getting into..

I would strongly suggest that you and your dad spend some serious time with local folks who are doing what you plan on doing... Learn from others before jumping into this endeavor.

Do you have a clue how the fall timber, and buck logs to yield the most board footage? Do you have a clue how to most efficiently skid logs, while causing the least impact on the land? Do you have a clue how to properly break down a log when milling to create the best lumber with the highest yield? These are just some of the things you and your dad MUST know, or the learning curve is gonna be very steep and very expensive.


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Slight detail on this thread. First off, I want a skidder like that, but all of our golf-course-lawn customers might start shooting if we drove that across their lawn...

I like your Lucas mill, have liked the concept for some time but I’ve never used one or seen one actively cutting in real life. I have some experience milling with an antique sawmill (think 1908 Frick sawmill driven by a steam traction engine). Circular blade, powered carriage, so very similar in operational concept to a modern production mill.

How is cut planning the same or different with your Lucas? I’m guessing that once the log is set in place it stays stationary? Or do you have to roll it on occasion to make quarter or ray sawn lumber?
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Slight detail on this thread. First off, I want a skidder like that, but all of our golf-course-lawn customers might start shooting if we drove that across their lawn...

I like your Lucas mill, have liked the concept for some time but I’ve never used one or seen one actively cutting in real life. I have some experience milling with an antique sawmill (think 1908 Frick sawmill driven by a steam traction engine). Circular blade, powered carriage, so very similar in operational concept to a modern production mill.

How is cut planning the same or different with your Lucas? I’m guessing that once the log is set in place it stays stationary? Or do you have to roll it on occasion to make quarter or ray sawn lumber?
Once the log is locked and loaded you don't touch it...The log is milled from top to bottom, and from left to right..Since it is a swing blade mill you can at any point in the log choose to mill flat sawn or vertical grain lumber...After you learn a few tricks it can spit out perfect lumber at a pretty rapid rate. The biggest downside for some is the fact that there is no automation, so it can be fairly physical.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
Once the log is locked and loaded you don't touch it...The log is milled from top to bottom, and from left to right..Since it is a swing blade mill you can at any point in the log choose to mill flat sawn or vertical grain lumber...After you learn a few tricks it can spit out perfect lumber at a pretty rapid rate. The biggest downside for some is the fact that there is no automation, so it can be fairly physical.
Thank you. That’s about how I was guessing it worked, but wasn’t sure. I definitely like the idea though, and the unlimited log size - we have had to split logs with gunpowder to saw them on the circular mill because they could not be cut.

I did not realize there was not at least a power feed on the Lucas, that would definitely be a physical operation!
 

JMB6

Member
Location
Cary
Anyone got this model from treestuff?
The brand is Timber Tuff. If you have it please share your feedback on it.
 

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