Biodegradable Bar oil and mix

eyehearttrees

Active Member
Location
Tampa-Area
I will say that even if I do someday end up having an occasional maintenance or performance issue, that I would consider the inconvenience well worth the trade off for reduced toxicity in the landscape.
To the landscape & to yourself considering it's not good for you getting petrol oils on yourself!

Anyone hear of the "gumming issue" occuring despite of temperature? I'm in FL, I made the change over a month ago, using generic canola oil, find the same setting on my saws has them going through more of the oil but I'm OK with that, if anything it may be lubing better (or I'm just looking for lube more, cannot rule that out...it's working well on my 18" 355t longest bar I use)

Hate the idea of having to deal w/ replacing gummed-up pumps & gearing but don't wanna go back to petrol....seems the gumming is strictly temp related but just hoping to hear if anyone in warm areas has also experienced it (if anything, my experience so far would lead me to think it'd gum/congeal/buildup less than the petrol I'd used before, it's certainly a bit thinner)
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
I've had no issues with canola oil... Just straight from the Kroger baking aisle. I've used it down to 10 degrees Fahrenheit. It certainly flows better than traditional bar and chain oil at those temps!
 

SeanRuel

Well-Known Member
Location
Portland
There's two different "gumming" problems I've noticed using straight canola oil.

One- gelling at very cold temps or below freezing if contaminated with water. No biggie, if straight canola gels it's too cold to work!

Two- varnish/laquering/ oil hardening. Basically just like linseed oil wood finish, the veggie oil molecules will cross link due to heat+oxygen iirc. This causes a hard varnish to build in some places. Mostly on the clutch cover and bar IME.
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
There's two different "gumming" problems I've noticed using straight canola oil.

One- gelling at very cold temps or below freezing if contaminated with water. No biggie, if straight canola gels it's too cold to work!

Two- varnish/laquering/ oil hardening. Basically just like linseed oil wood finish, the veggie oil molecules will cross link due to heat+oxygen iirc. This causes a hard varnish to build in some places. Mostly on the clutch cover and bar IME.
I have tried vege oil and seen the bar baked finish you describe.

I am wondering if the gumming up is the heating cycles from multiple short useages between fills? Like what happens to deep fryers when a scum forms on the walls before they purée it into gravy?
 

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