balance points for basic rigging

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Not exactly: he tipped tied a piece that helicoptered close to another climber in the same tree.
The other climber was absolutely scared as the piece was moving wildly around in his direction and cried out "let it down let it down". You could feel the other climber's helplessness as he had no control over his own safety and was just hoping that the ground man would do his job and keep him safe.

That particular cut there was absolutely no need to tip tie, as there was plenty of distance /height to let the piece drop tip first. If he had but-tied it the whole piece would have swung down and away from the other climber. Corey recognized it after I politely pointed out his error in the comment section.

And to be clear I'm absolutely not against tip-tying and use it on a fairly regular basis and absolutely consider it an essential and valuable technique to keep in the tool Box. However, needless tip tying is needless and potentially quite dangerous, as seen all too often on YouTube
 
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samsquatch

Well-Known Member
I didn't watch it either but I think Daniel is renaming the common peel cut as his "rip cut". whereas you have no face cut and only a backcut, the idea being that the limb drops slower and the butt remains attached for a period of time as the sapwood/cambium of the limb peels away from the leader. Only works well on some species, when they're green. And only suitable for removals since it leaves such a gnarly scar.

Buckin' films this technique all the time in his conifers.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
Have to respectfully disagree with you on the "only some species when they are green".

Its often just a matter of making a faster easier cut. You won't get much holding from the ripping fibers of deadwood, but that doesn't matter in many cases. It's just an easy cut that leaves no stub. As long as there is no line or lanyard below the cut, its usually a better option than an undercut and of course only for removals.
 

*useless info*

Well-Known Member
i think this concept is kinda like tree judo of using the length and weight of target against itself vs. a more bland butt tie standard/less thought strategy.
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i think it also shows the power of rope, and stretches out the constant ongoing mechanix in these things to more finely l-earn and tune.
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i see the most loaded movement point as the pivot.
And try to go beyond pivot on hinge with rope assist;
to a stage where rope is most loaded/becomes mechanical pivot
>>and hinge is just helper 'nosing' (like dolphin w/ball)load around on rope as greater loaded pivot stage
Before tearoff, for added effects and smoother handoff as rope already has most of it at tearoff compared to other strategy/paths.
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Plot rope angle at tearoff to be pulling away from climber some.
hinge-to-hitch-length-purposefully-used-for-self-tightening-rope-to-be-pivot-before-tearoff.png

i think this really , really shines for side turns
laying load purposefully hard down into rope,
daring it to push harder than you know it can.
Then rope angle forcing that downward force serving to pull to side hard(er) forcing meatier hinge sideways rotation
(almost sideways, always try to give some relief angle down).
This tightens rope more, but also in side rigging per haps more so.
For as hitch point move closer to support point in side rig line slackens, only get tighter if hitchpoint move away, not towards. So force down or perhaps a bit left, to get tighter line pull to right/less drop/more clearance.
 

*useless info*

Well-Known Member
Once can get higher tension rigidity in support rope (tension for pull, rigidity to use as lever, to then pre-tighten more, later even pull with swig/sweat line). ABoK, Brion Toss and others talk of sweat/swig of pulling across a tight line to tighten even more, by 'sweating' more 'purchase' of line across some 'friction buffer'(my term) from the load side to control side to tighten or move rope. Also in such verbiage, allowing more slack in line is 'paying out' rope; usually done carefully as other frugal payouts of the time! (Also 3/1 etc. jig to preTighten another line can be called a 3to1 purchase etc.)
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Found this to work as promised for pre-tightening, but then also to incite turn with pulse of sudden force thru system against hard tensioned supporting line . Combined with lowering long limb purposefully hard down into rope, daring load to go further than you know it can, allows side force to shine thru and pull around hard , as load floats on hinge. Hinge can now be thicker sideways, forced earlier by side force, just like pulling/wedging tree over with thicker hinge than without rope pull/wedge lift to arc on hinge pivot.
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Can move support point over to right, force branch/load to angle rope to left on it's end as well, leverage limb weight down, and pull swig line when load is more or less floating lightly on hinge.
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Especially the last 2 w/perhaps show how can visualize as list of electrical components or computer commands that plays out in order to certain end once empowered, CoG shifted to(wards) rope lights fuse of otherwise neutral/powerless scenario. Thus weightless rope and wood; wood is only range of CoG initiating force positions vs. hitch positions on same rigid wood range.
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This works well for ripping cuts, as well as hinging. Higning does give more open relief and allows hybrid of relief plus Dutchman push up some into the orchestration.
Sidewards sweeps from over roofs, almost like lowering to roof force field and sliding off force field when can go no further, following roof line as relief forces guide to offer system to follow. There is surprising power and control sleeping hear! And now more weight, further out, more horizontal are actually helpful to, rather than against efforts!
 
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