Awesome Crane Article in TCI Mag!

Tony

Well-Known Member
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Jack Wagon definition form Urban Dictionary= A useless piece of equipment, usually military, used to refer to a mule-drawn freight wagon which had been pieced together from dicarded or substandard parts, and subject to frequent breakdowns. Jackwagons typically were good for only one or two uses, then abandoned or discarded along roadsides and in ditches, and were often re-cannibalized to create new jackwagons.

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Exactly. That's what Mark was sayin'

I'd never call you a manby pamby.


Tony
 

oldirty

New Member
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I would head east and punch a certain tall fellow if it was me...just a thought.

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what you got?
 

oldirty

New Member
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He rode the short bus (urban dictionary) don't take him seriously.


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hey. it's no wonder you have zero clue about what a pick may weigh.....
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
As for a load moment indicator....don't need one and neither do you as you ain't gonna know what the piece weighs until just AFTER the moment it detaches, and if it ain't cool whatcha ya gonna do? Glue it back on there?

Hey, we all gotta die sometime Justine. It don't worry me even a tiny bit. I been in a war.
 

GMK3055

New Member
People Who do Crane work every day have a good idea what stuff weighs. So we can preload. And stuff like that.
 

tod_k

Well-Known Member
For sure. I operated and climbed using our boom truck with no LMI for years with no incidents. You do get a "feel for it". But that is something you can not teach in an article or presentation.
 
LMI can't hurt, to get feedback on weight on early pics in a tree. Not everybody is doing crane work every day. Even if you are, there can be big differences in water content within species, tree to tree.
 

GMK3055

New Member
well some one who has been doin tree work and crane work knows that type of stuff. all those things run threw your head when making picks . if you want them to come off nice and smooth.if u wonna look like some hack then preloading with the wright weight doesnt matter.
 

chris_girard

Well-Known Member
I would imagine that estimating water weight in a leader would be one of the most difficult things to quantify accurately. Definitely a rough guess, but I know what Rob is saying. These are things that you think about when you’re making picks.

Good points.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
water weight is obviously included in the species specific green (green meaning includes water still) log chart. What is more difficult to calculate IMO is the highly variable and uncharted weight of foliage.
 

chris_girard

Well-Known Member
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water weight is obviously included in the species specific green (green meaning includes water still) log chart. What is more difficult to calculate IMO is the highly variable and uncharted weight of foliage.

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So true, I don’t think anyone has an accurate “formula” to calculate the weight of foliage, that’s for sure.

Yes, we know that water weight is included in the Green Log Weight Chart, but does it say specifically in the chart what time of year that the weight was based on? I’m hoping that it is based on worst-case scenario.

I’m just throwing things out there, not arguing just curious.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
My understanding is that the U.S. Forest service green log weight chart, which forms the basis for what we use, is based on averages, from across the country and different calculation methods.

As such it would be representative, a cross section if you will. (Pun fully intended) Of course I realize the problem with averages. Half the people I know are below average!

I have always found it useful when estimating foliage to take the lenght of the branch and calculate based on its greatest diameter. For instance a 40' limb that is 20" in diameter at its greatest would be calculated as a log 40'x20". I am usually within a 200lb. No scientific, not fullproof, but a start.

Tony
 
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