Work Photos

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
I feel your pain. I also have that kind of luck, even with the stump grinder. I need ground penetrating radar and a geologist with me, or I'll hit a buried UFO, ancient monolith, or Jimmy Hoffa's remains every time.

We might be able to make a killing in the tourist trap museum industry.
 

27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
One of today's jobs, removing a declining big leaf maple. At least around here, by the time they get this big and about this old, they start to die back and fall apart. I did give a price to climb and remove all the dead, but they ended up deciding on removal rather than a maintenance project of a tree. Hard to blame them honestly.

I climbed up to maybe 35', removed two huge back-weight limbs that were the size of small/medium trees themselves and installed a cable around the trunk. Up there (and with a LOT more tree above me) I was already finding huge cavities in the trunk. The cable was hooked to the customers old 12,000 pound excavator for pull, then I just faced, backcut, followed with wedges and sent it over with a light pull.

Although the top half is dead or hollow, there is still tons of wood to use. The customer heats with wood and will be using a lot of this for firewood, and also has a mill and will probably make boards from it as well. The butt log was in great condition (which surprised me actually) and while it's too big for his mill, someone else with bigger equipment will probably make use of it.

00 blm 01.jpg

00 blm 02.jpg

00 blm 03.jpg

00 blm 04.jpg
 

27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
Solo rigging a large, long, weakly attached doug fir limb over an attached greenhouse.

The limb. It's obvious enough from the ground this thing should be reduced, add to that it was over a greenhouse and in a high wind area. Probably 80 feet high where the limb was attached to the trunk.

000 long limb 01.jpg

I have a retired climb line with a prusik on it for a movable attachment point, and that is tied off to the trunk as a rigging line.

000 long limb 02.jpg

Limb walking and removing the multiple branch tips. This felt pretty sketchy, as every single fir cone that came loose and landed on the plexi-glass below made quite the noise...

000 long limb 03.jpg

With a high tie-in I was able to brush-out the large limb and toss the tips into the woods to my right. I'm not a guy that normally leaves stubs on something, but these were what I was standing on while brushing out the limb. From this point I was able to make an undercut, then pull the tail of the rigging line so the heavy limb-wood folded into the trunk and away from the greenhouse below, then make the final cut to free it and swing it into the trunk.

000 long limb 04.jpg

This is the second part of the large limb wood, but shows how it swung into the trunk and away from the structure below, allowing me to cut it smaller and toss it away in a controlled manor.

000 long limb 05.jpg

It felt like a lot of work for a single limb, but certainly costs a lot less than repairing the greenhouse when it would inevitably fail.
 
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27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
Great day today. 7 hours dead-wooding fairly old 70-110' doug firs with a world-class view, small cuts so giving the 2511T a workout:

000 fir deadwood 01.jpg

Not bad scenery: Island, water, island, water, island, water, island, water....

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Looking to the south. Clouds in the distance, but on a clear day that whole skyline is a mountain range.

000 fir deadwood 04.jpg

Structure of the upper potion of the trees, a pretty high wind area though this doesn't totally show it. Many were close enough I could climb and prune one tree on the way up, transfer to the neighboring tree and prune it on the way down. I need to get a grappling hook to make longer traverses....

000 fir deadwood 05.jpg

A lot of the deadwood was pretty ancient and VERY precarious. As is common here, these trees had never been climbed/pruned before other than some low-limb removal. The focus was on the trees over the driveway, septic and future garden. Wonderful people to work for, probably another two days to go on this site.

000 fir deadwood 06.jpg
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
C9D7F2B2-D7B5-48B2-B4EA-4A8CD96D93F2.jpeg 1CECE0F2-94CE-4F0E-B12D-EA54A4DE1669.jpeg D7245724-F837-4478-8D64-004A5EA90675.jpeg Mini-skid has dramatically changed my quality of life, this job took a bit less than 6hrs start to finish. All but one, 100+’ back-leaner over primaries, was felled. No sore back, customer is happy, had time to do two other jobs for neighbors. Thank you for convincing me Treebuzz!!
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Beautiful
An old tree that had been through multiple big fires...As such it had a little too much heart rot for my liking but we did get some very nice boards out of it.. With these older Reds that have been through a few fires the limbs can also be a source of rot and bug damage so will be interesting to see what we get from the bigger logs closer to the stump that had no limbs...Fingers crossed.....
 
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rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
I tend to mill pretty equal amounts of flat sawn and vertical grain lumber.. I am partial to VG, but the flat sawn is stronger for many application...Luckily the Lucas makes it very easy to bang out either.
 

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