Hitch hiker/2/x thread

Dan Cobb

Well-Known Member
Location
Hoover
Disclaimer: I've never used a hitch hiker. While the concept seems brilliant,, knotting the ends of the hitch cord through the dog bone seems to be the least elegant part of the hitch hiker design. Although it does offer the benefit of eliminating the need for eye-to-eye hitch cords, tying the stopper knot every time seems slightly cumbersome. Would replacing the dog bone with, for instance, a load bearing quick release pin be an improvement? The pin would be inserted through the eyes of an eye-to-eye hitch cord. I envision one similar to those used on Gibbs. A means of securing the hitch cord eye to the tip end of the QR pin would be required, such as a fender washer, which could be tethered to the body of the HH.
Alternatively, maybe one end of the dogbone could be slotted and have some type of gate or pin that would allow the hitch cord (with a pre-tied stopper knot) to be inserted and securely retained, eliminating the need to tie it every time.
 

kludge

Active Member
Location
Eastern PA
@Dan Cobb, my HH2 is my go to climbing devise. I think you are right in that managing and tying the cord through the dogbone is the most fiddly part of the devise.

However, I do like the simplicity of manufacture and bomb-proofness of the system. Anything that makes it easier could also make it less secure or cause other problems. For example, the dog bone also stands off the rope from wearing on the edges of the HH2 body as it loads and unloads, so it provides wear protection for the hitch cord. And of course anything that opens can also accidentally open.

That said, some elegant solution that was secure, easy to use and just worked would be welcome.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
Here’s the dogbone better orientated with the braid in back, which doesn’t function as well as original configuration, with the dogbone being pulled more parallel to the rope than into it.
49E68CDD-8BF9-41A8-A41C-D646C72370F0.jpeg
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Location
Buffalo
Disclaimer: I've never used a hitch hiker. While the concept seems brilliant,, knotting the ends of the hitch cord through the dog bone seems to be the least elegant part of the hitch hiker design. Although it does offer the benefit of eliminating the need for eye-to-eye hitch cords, tying the stopper knot every time seems slightly cumbersome. Would replacing the dog bone with, for instance, a load bearing quick release pin be an improvement? The pin would be inserted through the eyes of an eye-to-eye hitch cord. I envision one similar to those used on Gibbs. A means of securing the hitch cord eye to the tip end of the QR pin would be required, such as a fender washer, which could be tethered to the body of the HH.
Alternatively, maybe one end of the dogbone could be slotted and have some type of gate or pin that would allow the hitch cord (with a pre-tied stopper knot) to be inserted and securely retained, eliminating the need to tie it every time.
I consider that one of the biggest attractions of the HH. Just needs a few bucks worth of bulk cord, no eyes needed.
Not super elegant in some opinions, sure, but what a work horse!
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Or you could experiment..try new things. Maybe create or own hitch. Better than any other. The day someone tells me how to run my gear. Is the day they take over my climbing. And that aint for another 20 years. But thanks anyway.

But if you would have said this another way....maybe id consider it.
Aren't you the young fella who doesnt seem to know the difference between a VT and a Knute?
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Location
Evansville
Alternatively, maybe one end of the dogbone could be slotted and have some type of gate or pin that would allow the hitch cord (with a pre-tied stopper knot) to be inserted and securely retained, eliminating the need to tie it every time.
I've seen this done somewhere, either a climber tinkering around or maybe it was a prototype... I forget who it was or where I saw it.
 

Christrees

Active Member
Location
New York
Aren't you the young fella who doesnt seem to know the difference between a VT and a Knute?
No i do..but even if i didnt. Id learn because i like to try new things. I just never used the vt on the hitchhiker. I have alot to learn about the hitchhiker and srt. I just started srt last summer.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
I too like to try new things and have tried just about every hitch known to man on the HH...That all taught me that Paul, the creator of the HH, was right with his recommendation of the HH hitch. As few wraps as needed. Adjust the length of your hitch as needed from day to day...Done.. All these extra braids, tucks, twist, ect are doing is fucking up the effectiveness and efficiency of the HH...My HH setup gives a Rope Runner or BDB a run for its money in speed and slack tending, but brings that sweetness and security that only a hitch based system can offer....
 
Last edited:

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Here’s the dogbone better orientated with the braid in back, which doesn’t function as well as original configuration, with the dogbone being pulled more parallel to the rope than into it.
View attachment 73279
From time to time I will run a 3/2 Vt with the down legs on the bone side...Not for the faint of heart, and not something I would recommend to any but the highly experienced.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
Location
Evansville
Page 18, post 354 of this thread.
Interesting, but not exactly what I remember seeing.

One end of the dogbone was elongated and had a groove instead of a hole, to midline attach a hitch cord. I forget if the end of the groove had a pin or if piece rotated to lock the hitch cord in the groove.
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Location
Montana
I consider that one of the biggest attractions of the HH. Just needs a few bucks worth of bulk cord, no eyes needed.
Not super elegant in some opinions, sure, but what a work horse!

I actually, do, think that the stopper knots are an elegant as well as a practical solution. All tools will have tradeoffs, but thankfully, we have many great ones to choose from.

A hitch-based system will always need adjustability. The stopper knots are excellent for that. Being able to buy your hitch cord in bulk or change it on a whim, priceless.
 

Christrees

Active Member
Location
New York
I too like to try new things and have tried just about every hitch known to man on the HH...That all taught me that Paul, the creator of the HH, was right with his recommendation of the HH hitch. As few wraps as needed. Adjust the length of your hitch as needed from day to day...Done.. All these extra braids, tucks, twist, ect are doing is fucking up the effectiveness and efficiency of the HH...My HH setup gives a Rope Runner or BDB a run for its money in speed and slack tending, but brings that sweetness and security that only a hitch based system can offer....
Yeah see....when you say it like that i can stand behind what you say. Its all about how you say it. I too like the original hitch. But i haven't tried it yet with 3 or 4 wraps. And i will. Thank you. Someone already reccomend that to me i think it was johnny but i cant say for sure. But i do remember reading alot of there posts. And i know they know what they're talking about. And yeah thats cool because i like hybrid setups alot better thank all the mechanicals ive tried.
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
Location
Chatham Co.
@rico, do you end up with the recommended ~1.5" (I think that's how much it is) between the bottom wrap of the hitch and the body of the HH after setting/weighting it?

When I ran it like that with the standard HH hitch, it tended so poorly that my over-the shoulder webbing strap tender would leave bruises. But the upside is that it would never fail to engage when sitting into it. I wasn't far enough along in my climbing education at the time for that not to freak me out (when it would fail to grab upon setback), so I didn't depart much from the 1.5" guideline.
 

Christrees

Active Member
Location
New York
@rico, do you end up with the recommended ~1.5" (I think that's how much it is) between the bottom wrap of the hitch and the body of the HH after setting/weighting it?

When I ran it like that with the standard HH hitch, it tended so poorly that my over-the shoulder webbing strap tender would leave bruises. But the upside is that it would never fail to engage when sitting into it. I wasn't far enough along in my climbing education at the time for that not to freak me out (when it would fail to grab upon setback), so I didn't depart much from the 1.5" guideline.
Just to the 1.5 aspect. I believe its 2"
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
@rico, do you end up with the recommended ~1.5" (I think that's how much it is) between the bottom wrap of the hitch and the body of the HH after setting/weighting it?

When I ran it like that with the standard HH hitch, it tended so poorly that my over-the shoulder webbing strap tender would leave bruises. But the upside is that it would never fail to engage when sitting into it. I wasn't far enough along in my climbing education at the time for that not to freak me out (when it would fail to grab upon setback), so I didn't depart much from the 1.5" guideline.
Retrieving some rigging gear this morning so I got a quick shot of my go-to 3 wrap HH setup...
2 inches, give or take, between HH body and the hitch crossover. Lightning fast and effortless tending....

IMG_1544.JPG
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Brand Spanky new and not even broken in... There was word on the streets that Paul recently had an accident/injury and was talking about possibly getting out of the game... Since all the ne'er-do-wells and lowlifes I work with LOVE the HH we bought more than a few HH2's. The thought of our offspring and future generations living in an HH2 free world forced us to take bold action...

I do hope that Paul is healing up and that he continues to manufacture what IMHO is one of the single greatest climbing devices available.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
Brand Spanky new and not even broken in... There was word on the streets that Paul recently had an accident/injury and was talking about possibly getting out of the game... Since all the ne'er-do-wells and lowlifes I work with LOVE the HH we bought more than a few HH2's. The thought of our offspring and future generations living in an HH2 free world forced us to take bold action...

I do hope that Paul is healing up and that he continues to manufacture what IMHO is one of the single greatest climbing devices available.
I bet your closet is full of toilet paper too.
 

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Climbing Innovations
Top Bottom