Hey Look at My Crud...

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Resinous polypore 27Jul20r .jpg
So all three images are of the same Norway maple, zooming in on a lachrymose/resinous polypore. This is right across the street from my house in Portland, ME. I expect it to be Ischnoderma resinosum but I suppose it could be Inonotus dryadeus. Will know more when an actual bracket gets produced. I'd be happy to consider another possible identification!
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
OK, I'll bite. I'd start with genus Lepiota (or Macrolepiota, to be more current). The "parasol fungus", a prominent edible, is L. procera. Unfortunately, there are some toxic (to lethality) members of the genus. Give it time, I expect it will form a flat cap.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Wonderful Monotropa! Maybe folks might like some background which to JD is old hat.
Perfectly self-respecting heath flowers (family Ericaceae). This is an unusual achlorophyllous genus which rather than making its own food through photosynthesis, it breaks down the carbohydrates formed by the mycorrhizal fungus...which in turn originated from photosynthesis by a green plant, probably a tree. So the mycorrhizal fungus provides a bridging function. The transfer of carbs from plant to fungus to plant (reciprocal translocation) was part of my dissertation topic. Sorry about that!
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
For the fuzzy yellow one, I'd start with the Dyer's Polypore, Phaeolus schweinitzii. Pretty common on spruce and some other conifers in the north. Grows at the tree base or from woody roots that are being decayed. Starts out yellow. At maturity, the upper surface of the cap may be banded yellow and brown.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Joe Boggs from our OSU Extension calls them the beech "Boogie Woogie" aphid as they "dance" in unison when disturbed.
Pine sawfly larvae are creepy in that they extend in unison as well. Also creepy in that you almost have to be trained to look for them as they are so well camouflaged in color ...but given away by the movement while feeding.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
Pine sawfly larvae are creepy in that they extend in unison as well. Also creepy in that you almost have to be trained to look for them as they are so well camouflaged in color ...but given away by the movement while feeding.
Yeah, that "hive mind" shit creepy to see in person
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
For the fuzzy yellow one, I'd start with the Dyer's Polypore, Phaeolus schweinitzii. Pretty common on spruce and some other conifers in the north. Grows at the tree base or from woody roots that are being decayed. Starts out yellow. At maturity, the upper surface of the cap may be banded yellow and brown.
guess I haven't seen such a immature one before, I see them all the time mostly desiccated or as you described.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Thanks Evo, yes, I usually see them with bands of brown to almost black, with the cap upper surface seemingly at duff level or just above. Usually when I see them, they are over-mature and fragmenting and look much like bark on dead buttress root. I've been fooled!
Also, to be fair, the pore surface of young to mature fruitbodies are characteristic for the species. Some lay guides call it "Dyer's mazegill".
 

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