Hemlock snag...filled with metal

Brady Chapman

Active Member
Location
Bethel, ME
You could spend another 3 paragraphs blowing smoke up you own ass and it would never change the fact that we all witnessed your spar rock backwards 3 times. Watch your vid from 3:36 - 3:50 buddy. That my friend is 3 dudes who clearly haven't got the slightest clue how to properly pull over wood. Strange because knowing how to properly pull wood over is basic Tree-man 101 shit that for some reason seems to has eluded you fellas. Thank god someone came along to point out the error of your ways before something bad happened. Some free insight that might save you a very hard lesson in the future. TreeBuzz is cool like that, ain't it.
Thank God. Thank you God for sending me someone to point out the err of my ways. And thank God is was a noble gentleman from northern California. You are the angel on my shoulder Rico ;)
 

Brady Chapman

Active Member
Location
Bethel, ME
You could spend another 3 paragraphs blowing smoke up you own ass and it would never change the fact that we all witnessed your spar rock backwards 3 times. Watch your vid from 3:36 - 3:50 buddy. That my friend is 3 dudes who clearly haven't got the slightest clue how to properly pull over wood. Strange because knowing how to properly pull wood over is basic Tree-man 101 shit that for some reason seems to have eluded you fellas. Thank god someone came along to point out the error of your ways before something bad happened. Some free insight that might save you a very hard lesson in the future. TreeBuzz is cool like that, ain't it.
If I were to blow more smoke I would point you toward my profile pic of the 130', 60" diameter multi leader white pine that we carefully dismantled in the middle of a cemetery with no damage to the grounds, or more importantly any headstones. But there's just something about 50' deadish hemlock stubs that brings out the worst in me :ROFLMAO:
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Thank God. Thank you God for sending me someone to point out the err of my ways. And thank God is was a noble gentleman from northern California. You are the angel on my shoulder Rico ;)
If I were to blow more smoke I would point you toward my profile pic of the 130', 60" diameter multi leader white pine that we carefully dismantled in the middle of a cemetery with no damage to the grounds, or more importantly any headstones. But there's just something about 50' deadish hemlock stubs that brings out the worst in me :ROFLMAO:
I suggest you reread post #3. That is about as kind, gentle, and noble as I am gonna get when I see someone make a mockery out of something as simple as properly pulling over a spar.. That was the moment for you to stop running your mouth, watch your own vid, realize that you had a hole in your game that needed tighenend up, and be grateful that someone brought it to your attention. Unfortunately for you that moment has passed, but hopefully someone here has realized that you never want to allow slack back into your system when pulling over wood...
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Location
Olympia, WA
Safety and speed are both from good planning, judgment, and execution.


I don't think tree work is particularly dangerous.

I do find soooooo many people make it so. Not throwing stones at the OP.

I mostly do mostly boring tree work. I'm okay with that.
 

Brady Chapman

Active Member
Location
Bethel, ME
Safety and speed are both from good planning, judgment, and execution.


I don't think tree work is particularly dangerous.

I do find soooooo many people make it so. Not throwing stones at the OP.

I mostly do mostly boring tree work. I'm okay with that.
I do 90% removals. Many of which are technical. There is a reason why tree work/ logging is considered one of the most dangerous jobs. They are not really looking at the guys that putter around the canopy with a silky.
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
“As long as the hazard has been identified and a control is in place to protect us from the identified risk, no danger need exist.”

The hazardous vs dangerous conversation comes up often here and elsewhere, worthwhile semantics. Treework doesn’t usually have to be dangerous, climbing dead trees is never fun though. Took a 20” oak top out of a dead oak this weekend as I didn’t want to climb higher...
You seem super opposed to some valid critiques folks have given, why’s that? Vids and pics are good spots for members to learn from each other and perhaps school some newbies.
 

Brady Chapman

Active Member
Location
Bethel, ME
“As long as the hazard has been identified and a control is in place to protect us from the identified risk, no danger need exist.”

The hazardous vs dangerous conversation comes up often here and elsewhere, worthwhile semantics. Treework doesn’t usually have to be dangerous, climbing dead trees is never fun though. Took a 20” oak top out of a dead oak this weekend as I didn’t want to climb higher...
You seem super opposed to some valid critiques folks have given, why’s that? Vids and pics are good spots for members to learn from each other and perhaps school some newbies.
Because I don’t find them to be particularly valid. The whole one handing the chainsaw thing simply makes me yawn to death. And I think Rico is being an alarmist to say that even a little bit of rocking is something everyone should be deathly afraid of. I’m fine with taking constructive criticism, I just don’t like to give creedence to zealousness. I don’t think rocking your spar is a great thing, and I know full well that you are increasing the risk of failure. But to say that someone who allows even the slightest rocking of a spar whether it be an isolated incident or not is a bonehead and needs to be educated on tree work 101 is simply ridiculous. That friggin hemlock was never in jeopardy of breaking. You’re all making a mountain out of a mole hill. And yes tree work is dangerous, don’t be silly. Why do you think we make the kind of money we do?
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
So how many times does one have to do something bone-headed before they should be considered a bone-head? Should one stop doing bone-headed shit before or after something goes wrong? I for one would love to hear your theories on bone-headedness Brady.....
 

Brady Chapman

Active Member
Location
Bethel, ME
This
So how many times does one have to do something bone-headed before they should be considered a bone-head? Should one stop doing bone-headed shit before or after something goes wrong? I for one would love to hear your theories on bone-headedness Brady.....
This has become a dumb conversation, sorry Rico, I’m bowing out
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Location
Olympia, WA
... And yes tree work is dangerous, don’t be silly. Why do you think we make the kind of money we do?
By making it boring, predictable, productive, and impressive, being properly insured, and not using it
By bringing specialized equipment to perform a routine service, mostly.


The was not a boring day. Another company, working next door, found out the crane was too small, so after dumping the top into a rope, the climber hammered wedges to get some crane picks to release, using some weird v-notch. This was pick #1. Not boring. Easy not to flip that pick, but...
 

Attachments

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
Nice job.

I would flushcut some of those stubs, and cut the spar hinge halfway through/ deep, or more, if neutral. Maybe not with all the metal.

definitely would put a progress capture on the rope. A Maasdam power puller turns that into a one person pull, and if redirected back to the butt, the climber can pull it, if solo.
How are these not valid, constructive, well-intended points for tightening up your technique?
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
That friggin hemlock was never in jeopardy of breaking. You’re all making a mountain out of a mole hill. And yes tree work is dangerous, don’t be silly. Why do you think we make the kind of money we do?
Bud, I’m not making a mountain of a molehill. I one hand a saw and don’t think that spar would have broke, and I didn’t give any pointers. Rocking it is not preferable like you said, and one-handing is increasing the chances of harm. Room for improvement and talking about trees is what’s going on here.
 

Fivepoints

Well-Known Member
I had a spar fall sideways after it rocked years ago. Probably didn't help I had one wedge in it slightly off to one side. It was a dead oak tree I was taking down in an apartment complex. My guys jerked it but didn't have enough pull. No anchors were readily available. It wasn't especially big. Probably 14 to 16 in dbh. When it set back, it blew out sideways. I got lucky that it missed one of the apartment buildings by about 5 feet. It was so brittle at the hinge that the fibers didn't really bend. They just kinda splintered. We now pull everything like that with our mini skid, excavator, or a mechanical advantage setup.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
A real life story of what can happen when you allow slack back into your pulling system. I sure hope young grasshopper is listening... Thanks for sharing that Fivepoints...
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
By making it boring, predictable, productive, and impressive, being properly insured, and not using it
By bringing specialized equipment to perform a routine service, mostly.


The was not a boring day. Another company, working next door, found out the crane was too small, so after dumping the top into a rope, the climber hammered wedges to get some crane picks to release, using some weird v-notch. This was pick #1. Not boring. Easy not to flip that pick, but...
That sounds like all kinds of excitement on that job! I sure don’t want to see that on one of my sites!

We too try to take the danger out of a hazardous project. Exciting sometimes? Sure, felling a 100’+ Oak tree whole is always exhilarating to watch and hear, and has its hazards but should be so predictable it’s boring. I want the only person onsite to think the job is exciting is the homeowner, and then only because they’ve never seen a chipper eat tree tops whole, or a crane lift 8000 lb. logs over their house. The crew should see it as another day of the same, predictable, efficient work.
 

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