EAB (emerald ash borer)

joe

Active Member
You're done with this thread already? I'm not done with this thread. I need to confront the eab infestations in my area as well as others will do in their areas eventually.
I will post as long as it helps others. This bug is very bad, and I'll post information about my encounters with it as long as the information I post helps others. Eab affects everyone including those who're not considered ethical within this industry. All are affected by it.

I'm still waiting to hear that our extension service has written a letter about the specific tree for which I posted.
Our extension service is under funded and overworked. It's understandable since the economy has taken a downturn. For those who need support from their extension service to verify pest problems such as eab infestations, be patient with them.

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/eab/index.shtm

These are websites which gives links to other sites which describe how an eab infestation appears in various stages. I used woodpecker activity to detect the pest in my specific example. I read about it previously, kept it in mind, and discovered an infestation with the clues from them.

http://www.emeraldashborer.info

http://www.ohioagriculture.gov/eab

http://www.ashalert.osu.edu

These are sites which discuss eab and clues to detecting infestations.

Remember, reporting eab infestations on this site doesn't give competitors an advantage, but helps all to eradicate a pest that can save our Ash trees.

Please, please, keep posting anything that can help us to save our Ash trees, including detection, and wood responses to rigging scenarios. Working with trees is our job and livelyhood.

Joe
 

Liam

Member
I've heard that Imidacloprid is being used with significant success, in both soil injection/drench (such as Merit) and trunk injection.

I also believe that Milwaukee is using the TreeAge treatment (someone from the area, please correct me if I'm worng

Have any of you used Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub Insect Control? its over-the-counter stuff for homeowners, and I've read about it in several places.

Here's an article about it from Michigan State : http://emeraldashborer.info/files/E2955.pdf

I'm looking to start treating an ash in my parent's front yard since they now found it in western wisconsin. Wondering if any one have used it or have heard other opinions about it?
 

woodsboy67

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I've heard that Imidacloprid is being used with significant success, in both soil injection/drench (such as Merit) and trunk injection.

I also believe that Milwaukee is using the TreeAge treatment (someone from the area, please correct me if I'm worng

[/ QUOTE ]


You are correct about Milwaukee, and Cedarburg is using Imidacloprid. Here is a link to the info:http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/42749267.html
 

Liam

Member
I'm sure all of you in Minnesota heard the news today, EAB was identified in St Paul near Hampden Park
 

Raven

Well-Known Member
Yeah, just saw that on KARE 11. What a bummer. Now the hacks are really gonna come outta the woodwork. Man, I friggin hate Imidicloprid, you know it's been found in human breast milk in indigenous peoples of the Arctic? In our haste to try to save trees and vegetables we're saturating the web of life with a poison that is sure to have a negative affect un us.
 

Sciuropterus

New Member
I have been seeing/hearing a LOT more woodpecker activity in my neighborhood (Richfield, MN) this year compared to previous years. They are everywhere. Tons of Ash in my area, including the best tree in my yard.
 

KyLimbwalker

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
also they dont attack mountain ash.

[/ QUOTE ] I thought mountain ash was not a Fraxinus sp.?? Sorbus, maybe?
 

joe

Active Member
Here's an update to the original tree that I found having eab. The boss received and gave a letter written by a university plant, pest, and diagnostic clinic. The letter was presented to the client. No action has been taken. I drove by this tree and found watersprouts growing from the the lower parts of the scaffold branches. The tree looks like it's responding to over thinning. It wasn't thinned.

This past week, I found another tree infested with eab. My primary I.D. characteristic which led me to suspect an eab infestation was again, excessive woodpecker strikes along scaffold branching. What I did to further the diagnosing process was to strip bark from a couple of woodpecker holes to see the galleries. I had no choice but to injure the tree because of the nature of the threat by this insect. I then removed an infested limb to obtain a sample to show the client. This limb was big, but not huge in comparison to the size of the tree. The woodpecker damage and the galleries made by the eab is what I'm using to identify this pest. Again, this tree had no excessive deadwood than what could be expected for a maintained tree. I'm told this tree will be removed next week.

I contacted my Dept. of Ag. They have an eab hotline. They have written material, brochures, i.d. cards, fact sheets, etc. that will be sent to those of us who need to spread the word about eab. I requested brochures which were written by the USDA. For me, it was paid with tax dollars. One thing I noticed was many states have an eab hotline. They were listed in the brochures I received. One can get educational material, dump sites, mills willing to take urban ash tree wood, and learn about areas where eab has been reported and confirmed.

Good luck to those of us who need to work with eab infested trees.

Joe
 

tophopper

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
also they dont attack mountain ash.

[/ QUOTE ] I thought mountain ash was not a Fraxinus sp.??

[/ QUOTE ]

Its not, hence the reason EAB does not attack them. For what its worth EAB doesnt attack spruce trees either.
 

joe

Active Member
This is an update to my original posts. The 2nd Ash tree has been treated chemically in hopes of saving it. I've heard nothing about the 1st Ash tree.

Joe
 

tnttree

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
.. and a smarst a$$ is better than a dumb a$$


[/ QUOTE ]

johnny don't have no a$$, he worked it off
 

KentuckySawyer

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
also they dont attack mountain ash.

[/ QUOTE ] I thought mountain ash was not a Fraxinus sp.??

[/ QUOTE ]

Its not, hence the reason EAB does not attack them. For what its worth EAB doesnt attack spruce trees either.

[/ QUOTE ]

Who peed in your Cheerios?

Rather than type some reply that I'll regret...

Consider yourself ignored. (or is that ignoramus)
 

joe

Active Member
You are welcome. Post any info you find relevant to this situation so "we" can learn with it.

Joe
 
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