Beaver damage, What to do?

theXman

Well-Known Member
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kill them all! :)

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yeah, i should have said, kill them all, just don't get caught
 

jerseygirl

Active Member
SOme of us think it is an honor to see them in the wild. Being a CITY concrete queen, they are amazing.

Most folks here put up the wire about the trees that they want and leave the other snacks for the beavers. Relocating them is not going to work as others will just move into the area.

Live with your neighbors, be it man or mouse

jz - liking nature as it be
 

tom_otto

New Member
Sean,

You could live trap them, train them, and hire them to work on your crew.

Tom

When are we gonna grab a beer?
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Sean,

You could live trap them, train them, and hire them to work on your crew.

Tom

When are we gonna grab a beer?

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If only I could teach them to chew a good, accurate directional facecut!


Beer...hmmm...being tax paying week, its a bit slower right now. Maybe this week. I'll be great to do, sometime.
 

speelyei

Active Member
Staff member
I think the more pressing issue is to ID the fungus and figure out exactly what you're dealing with. Any of those are bad news. I haven't seen or heard of any effective treatments for LRR, armillaria, or annosus.

as a sidebar, the process to become a licensed trapper in Oregon is quite simple. A free study guide is available from ODFW, and you take a short test. Pay a small fee, and that's it. Putting ethical issues on trapping aside, it would be another service you could offer if you have a lot of clients who suffer property damage from Mountain Beaver, Beaver, Nutria, etc.
 

boreality

Well-Known Member
One of my favorite stories from my tree planting days was at a large camp, just set up that week. In the middle of the night I heard a roar, I thought it was a bear so I rolled over and let someone else deal with it. In the morning the story was the Australian had his German Shepard killed by a beaver. That was the roar and then the Aussie killed the beaver with a machete screaming "bloody platapus." So be careful sending a dog after them, they can hold there own with a wolf.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I think the more pressing issue is to ID the fungus and figure out exactly what you're dealing with. Any of those are bad news. I haven't seen or heard of any effective treatments for LRR, armillaria, or annosus.

as a sidebar, the process to become a licensed trapper in Oregon is quite simple. A free study guide is available from ODFW, and you take a short test. Pay a small fee, and that's it. Putting ethical issues on trapping aside, it would be another service you could offer if you have a lot of clients who suffer property damage from Mountain Beaver, Beaver, Nutria, etc.

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Yes on the ID. My wife's a pathologist, and may go on a site visit, and root exam, probably in a week or so.

This is the only beaver situation that I've encountered thus far, but it sounds like it could be lucrative and worth pursuing. Thanks for the tip.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
From the get-go, I was trying to explain about forests as dynamic systems. Nutrient cycling, wildlife habitat, etc. They are starting to see the forest as more than standing, live trees.

The root disease concerns me much more than the beavers due to proximity to the house, and they just lost another tree.

I think that the treatment for LRR is to watch the forest change and get treated watching the dynamic nature of nature. Maples will move in, successionally speaking, baby beavers and such.

They have way too much lawn up away from the existing forest, turning wetland. I think that they can protect what they want to keep, plant new trees closer to their house, where they will be enjoyed much more, and let nature take its course.

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=6211+18th+...211+18th+Ave+SW,+Olympia,+WA+98512&gl=us&ei=ap_ES7HiLIassgOs3cHADg&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=1&ved=0CAoQ8gEwAA
I can't be positive, but I think that the "A" is right where the largest doug-fir is located, with the house (not yet built in that pic) directly west of it. On the "Sattelite", it shows the existing pond to the north, flowing northish toward southish.
 
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