swing dutchman

TheTreeSpyder

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida>>> USA
Tapered Hinge is very strong strategy in tree or on ground.
>>Can use as side ballast on 'off-side' than sideLean that starts at first motion
>>Also can use on 'more 'horizontal slides' in tree w/rope
Even so powerful ballast can do crane lift from horizontal to vertical with Tapered Hinge against sideLean etc. to allow crane not to fight that side load thru range until tearoff at (near) vertical (last direction to fell something is up!)
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The re-apportioning to leveraged positioning of increased side pull in hinge to offset side pull in head is very proper mechanix.
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1man chainsaw sold in 50's, Dent and Beraneck luckily first on scene and wrote definitive texts to hand down. Dent describes tapered shape as does Beraneck. Dent does go further with Dutch/stepDutch and swingDutch. Showing powers of, which MOSTLY to me shows are powerful mechanix, and why to even more purposefully plot to NOT invoke, except where need a dot (or blob) of that spice (after 10+ yrs hard at it..)
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Bypass along fibers from upper slant cut, is just a close ACROSS fibers, but on the FLEX axis
>>can force hinge stronger w/o the 'forward backstop' that gets engaged on close to give even more support than when hinge 'birthed'.
Analogous to forcing strip or tapered hinges stronger by added FORWARD force of rope or wedge, that is then relieved after hinge birthed stronger, becomes like added support of VERTICAL close.
The front horizontal cut , as a front backstop , presses across vertical fibers in normal use anyway, vertical bypass just doesn't let do as strongly as start to handicap situation to needed more hinge backfield (most leveraged positions) to make up for the lost support, that is then added back in later..
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HORIZONTAL close of Dutchman is totally different, it is a mechanical stop command, not re-flex again. for the close is up the fiber bundle strength columns, (not across) as to hold temple roof, not the Samson angle across . Horizontal close full face is full stop command at front, if can go forward but rear of tree must, get split decision of BC. Step Dutchman offers 1 side of relief, that full face doesn't. Step Dutchman is to specialize the close on 1 side w/compression, just as Tapered Hinge specializes to 1 side with tension. Both impose radial arc across towards off-side , even more powerful as used together. For each is actually a pivot of the other and this compounding VERY powerful, especially w/o stabilizing patch of hinge on lean side. Can get swing w/o step if remove stabilizing patch of hinge on lean side, but not as powerfully as w/Dutchman in the mix.
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Mostly show Dutch and 'MIA Patch' strategies to show the power, and to know NOT to especially accidentally invoke their forces. Tapered Hinge uses greater sideLean to pull stronger with same hinge (as strip hinge will also try to do, stretching out the harder stretched fibers on the off-side. Dutchmans , also close harder with harder sideLean to invoke the forces, BUT also use the speed of the sudden slap of faces. E=MCsquared (Mass x Speed squared), means the speed is much more potent change input, therefore output. Tapered Hinge is ballast until tearoff but not speed dependent for output, Dutch comes later after speed builds from Zer0. Dutchman can bind to 'overload constitution of tree as a container of forces' to crack etc. or even BC. Tapered much more plottable and friendly, Dutchman much more volatile/risky/deadly, especially in these MASSIVE machine leverages x MASSIVE weights. A Dutchman carries with it, the 'Impact of Change', Tapered was there all the time. Tapered capitalizes on the Natural fiber tension patterns tree uses in daily life, while minimizing hinge strength towards target/as fortifies against side lean, tree doesn't Naturally Dutch, it is a contrivance of ours.
 
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Daniel

Well-Known Member
The last two posts (before spidy's), #59 and #60, clearly summarize the same arguments that were made in 2004 when TCIA mag published the Artice "Greater Falling Accuracy Using the Tapered Hinge".


Yours truly on the cover... the article starts on page 8.

After it was published, Ken Palmer told me to my face, that his scientists in Germany have "proven" that the tapered hinge doesn't work.

On the other hand one of the readers.. may ave been on this forum commented "why would you write an article on that, you might as well write about where to put the gas and oil in a saw".

It's interesting to see how much change there has been in the world and technology since then, and yet here we are having the same old controversy.

Personally, I have seen the tapered hinge do the following:

1) give seeming amazing control against a heavy side lean (got it on video)
2) give almost no control against a side lean

A) Keep the tree on course with the directional control of the notch (the vast majority of times)
B) Turn the tree to direct the tree to a lay perpendicular to the back cut, which was many degrees off the gun of the notch. This has been rare, seems more prevalent in red maples than other species, but has happened several times (got it on video, though it was technically a swing dutchman and not a tapered hinge in that video)

So there are clear inconsistencies. I have yet to fully discover and understand the many factors that may influence its performance in every scenario. Yet, I have seen it function so well so often to fight the side lean of a tree, that I use it in the majority of falling cuts. More than half the time. Often, just for a little added protection to one side of the fall.
 
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rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
IT'S NOT 2 CUTS ... can you count to three yet?
Just because you can't manage to make an undercut in 2 cuts like any decent professional, and have to resort to your fucking plate cut, that doesn't change the fact that the 2 intersecting cuts on your finished undercut DO NOT MEET EXACTLY. Which by the way is the literal definition of a bypassed undercut...Case closed...
 
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Daniel

Well-Known Member
the top and bottom cut of this notch did not intersect.... that's the whole point of a plate cut... no intersection, means no potential for bypass. it would be impossible to bypass two cuts that did not even contact each other. Your mind is closed!
 

TheTreeSpyder

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida>>> USA
As a point of fine wood craftsmanship , cuts should meet squarely.
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The deadly Dutchman in standard cut is if the HORIZONTAL face cut/perpendicular to fiber grain, bypasses slanted, making face close within face close. Slanted face cut bypassing horizontal is totally different animal, as is more properly across flexible axis of fiber on close, as a more of a flex within flex type mechanic. Tho the force can be same, the dis-position of mechanix towards opposite 90, gives here too, opposite effect of mechanic.
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Full face Horizontal Dutchman offers no path of relief, provides snap cut in tree limb, but overload in ground usage/ full scale/felling usage. Step Dutch offers relief path. But not same if slant is bypasser.
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Just as Tapered Hinge works greatest at extreme outer leverage points, so does Dutchman.
 
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