Leaving rope in tree over night

Old tree guy

New Member
Location
Lake Charles
Yep... something didn't feel right about leaving it in the tree. Between regulations and squirrels, you guys have me convinced. I will leave the squirrels with a tasty morsel of throw line instead.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
Some of the competitive climbers are maybe a little full of themselves, but most of the climbers that I've met or talked to that are doing the work are really great guys.

My first comp I was in Flint Anderson's group. I had no idea who he was and just started chatting him up. He is awesome. My second and latest, I arrived with my SO and son at my first station early, introduced myself and chatted with the only others present - Jimmy Pritchard, his SO, and their dog. No idea who he was. They are totally down to earth and willing to share beta with the "new guy". Both Flint and Jimmy went on to win outright. There are some dumbshits out there, but I've had a fantastic experience overall.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
Noting some great comments here that will help up my game.

I left a line in a 45 foot-tall laurel oak for two nights last week. First day I knocked myself with my handsaw and had to recover for 1.5 days. The second day we garden pruned two hollies and a crepe myrtle then got run off by a pop-up lightning storm. Both circumstances where you might leave a rope in a tree, but also circumstances where I could avoid that with preparation or other better habits.

On initial inspection, the tree had visible squirrel chew, so I set a base-tie TIP that accounted for the worst and climbed to inspect my TIP. It was 4" diameter with dead exposed heartwood. I reset my TIP before working. After the two nights, I pulled on the base tie to visually inspect the portion that was atop the crotch - which is both the area where squirrels tend to chew and the area that is not visible from below. Then I retensioned the line and climbed to finish the prune.
 

Riggs

Well-Known Member
Location
Bryn Mawr , Pa.
I'm pretty new to rope climbing... and at 67 pretty slow in the tree. My question is what is the recommendation or general rule about leaving a climbing rope setup on anchor in a tree overnight? It might take me a few days to.rig down a huge tree I'm working.
whan your done at 68 , whats next ? want to take the rope with you ?
 

DavidP71801

New Member
Location
Hope
It's called an Attractive Nuisance, and should not be left unattended.
I kind of agree with that and I kind of think it's bull shit at the same exact time I agree to the extent that a person shouldn't have a pool that does not have a fence and gate around it that can be locked but at the exact same time under that law if somebody that turns 18 tomorrow gets hurt on your property being stupid you're liable but if they did it the next day when they're 18 they would be guilty of a crime I just don't see how that could ever be fair the way it is on either side of the fence I mean there should be something in there about reasonable securement I guess you could call it like say the child jump a fence in that case you have a fence that you have a locked gate on that would constitute reasonable securement and then you wouldn't be liable if they got hurt if that makes any sense
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
Location
Puget Sound
Hi, I am 67 too and climb as often as I can. I bookmark my favourite trees with paracord which holds up very well out in the elements over long periods of time. Strong and relatively cheap. 1200 foot spools on eBay for $45. or so. The gray, brown, and military green all seem invisible at any distance, and I have not had any of them ever tampered with so far. If near a trail, however, I toss the ends up high where it takes a pole to retrieve it later.
 

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