Hitchhiker with zigzag+?

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
First, my official position is that this is all unnecessary. Aside, whatever you do with the zig zag, watch the angle of the “hitch” attachment to the yellow base. They should not be pressing against each other when you load the device with your body weight. If they are, bad configuration.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
The bottom part of the Sticht hitch creates friction that might be able to help the ZZ in SRT. Some hitch cord, a ring, and a rope thimble are the basics needed. I don’t have a a ZZ, so need to follow the low and slow.
View attachment 65239
Very intrigued at how this LOW PRICED friction-ring, tied-cord SRS will develop.

Cheapest thing going.
Gear manufactures won't care for it.
 

SeanRuel

Well-Known Member
That's made out of yale uni-line pretty sure. Really iteresting rope, crazy stiff and durable.

Davey Seattle bought a bunch of uni-line fliplines after wire cores were banned by hq. Mixed reviews, but reasonably comparable to wire core. Could rig something similar with a wire core lanyard and a ring on a prussic.
 

Skye401

New Member
The bottom part of the Sticht hitch creates friction that might be able to help the ZZ in SRT. Some hitch cord, a ring, and a rope thimble are the basics needed. I don’t have a a ZZ, so need to follow the low and slow.
View attachment 65239
pretty sure one of the issues of just using a zig zag in a SRS configuration was that it doesn't maintain the proper angle for the device. It doesn't look like adding the stitch hitch here would help with that.
 

KentuckySawyer

Well-Known Member
It was due to poor maintenance and lack of inspection
Couple of hairs to split... presumably, the device failed because of either misuse and/or manufacturer defects.

The climber fell because of bad decision making. Primarily, not taking care of their kit (poor maintenance), poor gear selection (kit that either hadn't been inspected or had and the climber used it anyways.)

But how many Zigzags have to break before it's Petzl's fault?
 

Skye401

New Member
Couple of hairs to split... presumably, the device failed because of either misuse and/or manufacturer defects.

The climber fell because of bad decision making. Primarily, not taking care of their kit (poor maintenance), poor gear selection (kit that either hadn't been inspected or had and the climber used it anyways.)

But how many Zigzags have to break before it's Petzl's fault?
I feel like it's less a matter of how many and more so a matter of why they broke.

If people were dropping out of trees because they kept side loading carabiners we wouldn't blame the manufacturer over it.
 

KentuckySawyer

Well-Known Member
I feel like it's less a matter of how many and more so a matter of why they broke.

If people were dropping out of trees because they kept side loading carabiners we wouldn't blame the manufacturer over it.
But the fact that so many, of multiple generations have broken, makes me think that it isn't a very robust tool for tree work. It is amazing and all, but I'm equally leary of it.
 
After a lot of time and consideration. Totally decided the zag hiker will not come to fruition. It was a thought provoking idea, but the potential for funky loading and usage outside of its designation made me too leery to attempt it in a work setting. Which is totally okay because the hh2 works well enough all around.
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
...so many, of multiple generations have broken...
In April of 2013 Petzl recalled all ZigZags made prior to October of that year. They would give you a retail price plus 30% refund or that same amount in any Petzl gear. As the release of the 2014 edition approached, they changed it to replacement with the beefed up version. When the link plate fractures occured, during a change of steel tempering process, they again would replace it with the newer version 3 units. Nobody fell from the link plate fracture issue... if the plate broke, it would just lock the thing up and you'd be stuck on the rope. Petzl pays all shipping costs when you send a ZZ in for replacement.

The only issue to arise from a version 3 unit is the one in THIS POST and that unit did not break at all. The climber claimed it was an issue with a spring in a part that has no springs, and sent it back to Petzl. As can be seen in the climber's own photos, the unit was fine, just very dirty.

According to Petzl, they have received no Version 3 or Version 4 units back with any mechanical failures, and only knew about the one mentioned above.

I'm not sure what else Petzl could do... they fix any problems they find, and replace any that might possibly fail. Sometimes defects take a long time to show up. Petzl has a huge market share in the industry, and a very low overall product failure rate.

I'm sorry the ZigZag makes you nervous. I hope you find something you like that works as well.
 

KentuckySawyer

Well-Known Member
I'm sorry the ZigZag makes you nervous. I hope you find something you like that works as well.
Great post, Jeff! Its easy to have headlines make things look more dire than they really are.

My interest in the zigzag has still dropped off the cliff (no need to feel sorry for me!). I'm pretty confident in my ability to work a friction hitch!
 
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