Another aerial friction rigging device?

JMerritt

Well-Known Member
Location
santa cruz
You did a limb that heavy by yourself??? Now I know I've been missing the boat. When self lowering with my new Morgan Block I have been using an extremely fuzzed up piece of half inch safety blue. It wasn't giving me near the right amount of friction and I plan to bring new rope for it the next time.

Additionally if anyone notices a particular rope that jumps up in friction I would be interested to know type.

Yes chislebit I just girth hitched it on. The Ultra sling I bought has pockets that are just a tad snug to thread the MB through but I like it in spite of that,
Safety blue is pretty soft if I recall correctly, try stable braid 1/2” or one of the firmer 16 strand lines
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
Great, thank you. I have a 200 foot length of newish stable braid I'll use temporarily.

Then if some good results come in with a specific 16 strand I'll get an 80 and 120 foot length to use most of the time.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
I love the Morgan Block. Used the 200 foot of Stable Braid and had great friction. Also....this just made me smile and feel the love....each turn whether it was 75 lbs or 300 lbs I could just take the line out of the block and set up the next limb while my ground guy handled the last.

I also used the MB at my location to control the load slung from a crotch over a favorable landing zone - nice!

Have an 80 and 120 foot 16 strand coming with tight eyes on both ends, I'm gonna make that thing sing. :)
 

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
Location
Coastal N.J
So much of the work in above vid from jmerrit i could see using the mb attached to the load in a span fashion instead of 2 ropes .. looks like a good piece of kit either way
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
I was threre for a bunch of the footage I believe you're referring to, post #143, all the clips with newer blue sided, blue slung Morgan Block. Also for the Euc limbs and wood using the older all silver MB.

That was Lawrence Schultz doing all the hard and smart work. We had a smallish landing zone on the side of a hill that quickly went to 45°. Dome the limbs he was dealing with were whippy 40 and 60 foot long limbs over the house and ocean winds were slated to be coming up to mid 20's mph.

I loved how fast he was getting material down to me and soon that he was even willing to stay up in the tree and work under those conditions.

Why would he/we have wanted to span rig some of that? Or another way of looking at it is, what more would we have accomplished? (Sincere question.)
 

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
Location
Coastal N.J
I was threre for a bunch of the footage I believe you're referring to, post #143, all the clips with newer blue sided, blue slung Morgan Block. Also for the Euc limbs and wood using the older all silver MB.

That was Lawrence Schultz doing all the hard and smart work. We had a smallish landing zone on the side of a hill that quickly went to 45°. Dome the limbs he was dealing with were whippy 40 and 60 foot long limbs over the house and ocean winds were slated to be coming up to mid 20's mph.

I loved how fast he was getting material down to me and soon that he was even willing to stay up in the tree and work under those conditions.

Why would he/we have wanted to span rig some of that? Or another way of looking at it is, what more would we have accomplished? (Sincere question.)
Hey Merle, in my experience 1 rigging line instead of 2 is easier to manage. So less time managing line maybe could've sped up process, if competing against foul weather moving in. Another note for the span rig for not slamming pieces into rigging points The pieces move slower on a span coming off the pivot point as the opposing lines vectors keep the load moving with friction spread between two sheaves, usually in opposing direction. 1 on the load and 1 at first anchor point. Keeping the load in between anchor points sort of equalizing instead of slamming into other trees or busting apart creating safety hazard possibilities, like in last cut of the vid. Obviously I wasn't there , but it looked from what I could see as a useful technique for a handful of the cuts, mainly my point was using the Morgan Block on the load piece being removed would definitely be used in my day to day rigging , as I find myself running double whips and span rigs on large trees in tight yards frequently. Im certainly not questioning lawernce3000s rigging choices or his capabilities. I know he's top notch
 

JMerritt

Well-Known Member
Location
santa cruz
Genuinely curious, and I can’t be 100% sure I’m visualizing your description of span rigging. Can you explain exactly how that setup works?
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
Thanks for your thoughts Treetop.

I was glad we had the Morgan Block applying friction as the pieces came off and swung over to equalize under the rigging point. It made things very smooth.

One more question, in span rigging, single rope, where would apply the MB to have the best effect?
 

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
Location
Coastal N.J
Genuinely curious, and I can’t be 100% sure I’m visualizing your description of span rigging. Can you explain exactly how that setup works?
Theres a quite a few varieties of set ups. Mainly setting a rigging point and terminating end of riggin line somewhere in the tree as well depending on where you want to land pieces. Then working off the space between the 2 points. You can use a blocks , rings, pintos , carabiners, for main rigging point and the rigging that is attached to the load that will be in the span. I generally use nylon loop runners with caribiners or with pintos for lighter stuff and graduate up to rings and blocks on deadeye slings for larger weights. It allows us to not need friction at base of tree as much and increases flexibility with rigging point redirects in the tree to build strength into our system. Sometimes we span or highline to other trees or work a span within a tree. Soemtimes the termination end and the main rigging point are in the same vicinity, not really a span , but you are adding another leg of line with a bend in the rigging line. Works well for lifting pieces or pretensioning.
 

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
Location
Coastal N.J
Thanks for your thoughts Treetop.

I was glad we had the Morgan Block applying friction as the pieces came off and swung over to equalize under the rigging point. It made things very smooth.

One more question, in span rigging, single rope, where would apply the MB to have the best effect?
I thought as the main rigging point or possibly the floating block on pieces that are being removed.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
I self lowered some heavy pine limbs from over a building. As they were getting too heavy for my ability to hold them well with the Morgan Block I ran the rope up and over the next limb higher rather than call for more gear for four limbs. It worked great but made me wonder. Does anyone have experience with how the MB handles pitched up rope?
 

JMerritt

Well-Known Member
Location
santa cruz
I self lowered some heavy pine limbs from over a building. As they were getting too heavy for my ability to hold them well with the Morgan Block I ran the rope up and over the next limb higher rather than call for more gear for four limbs. It worked great but made me wonder. Does anyone have experience with how the MB handles pitched up rope?
I’ve run it through some heavy sap. It definitely changes the grip. If it gets too pitchy then it has to be run from up close to the block (climber feeding the rope) as just the weight of the rope can cause it not to run. I’ve not had it jam bad enough that feeding rope from near the device didn’t run at all. Definitely run the lower friction setting.
 
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