When people try to do their own treework

You’re welcome! Best of luck to you!
They have classes scheduled for September too!!

Just curious. When they say "climbing", they are referring to climbing live trees for pruning, etc. I don't think they are talking about spur climbing for purposes of limbing and removal. My primary interest is to learn how to climb with spurs and ropes for removing limbs to ultimately bring large trees down.

Thanks!
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Location
Alorgia
They have classes scheduled for September too!!

Just curious. When they say "climbing", they are referring to climbing live trees for pruning, etc. I don't think they are talking about spur climbing for purposes of limbing and removal. My primary interest is to learn how to climb with spurs and ropes for removing limbs to ultimately bring large trees down.

Thanks!
A friend of mine teaches that course.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
They have classes scheduled for September too!!

Just curious. When they say "climbing", they are referring to climbing live trees for pruning, etc. I don't think they are talking about spur climbing for purposes of limbing and removal. My primary interest is to learn how to climb with spurs and ropes for removing limbs to ultimately bring large trees down.

Thanks!
You are correct, this is a pruning/rope climbing course. No spurs will be used during the course. It is what I recommend however for anyone starting out. If you can climb without spurs, using spurs is easy - strap them on and go, after you’re tied in with your rope like you would be anyway. If you learn with spurs first, you’re less likely to learn how to actually climb properly, you’ll end up just learning to spike a tree-shaped pole.
 

dmonn

Active Member
Location
Mequon
I'm a DIY homeowner "pretend" arborist. Not wealthy, and just retired. I had about 400 ash trees (mostly small) on my property that the EAB killed. I started removing them before they died, and got about 250 of them down. I no longer climb them. I started slow and cautious. I couldn't possible afford to have somebody else do the work, but felt that with enough research and caution I could learn to do the work safely. So far so good. I'm getting to be a decent climber and love it. I've learned a ton through this forum, experience, and other research. As the homeowner, I have the luxury of being able to be overly cautious, take my time, think through and analyze the situation before doing any of the work. I don't need to get the job done to make a living at it. There's also no way I could afford to pay somebody to drop and clean up 400 trees.

My neighbor started cutting some of his dead trees (much smaller number--maybe 20) with help from his kids, wife, and relatives. His kids are 20+ yrs old, and his wife is pretty competent around machinery. I saw his son setting up a ladder to cut off some large branches, and suggested he look up some youtube videos of chainsaws with ladders. He did, and then my neighbor asked how I would do it. I said I'd climb it for him, and drop the limbs. I did it pretty quickly and easily. I then helped him drop a bunch of other trees, and let him use some of my rigging equipment. I also showed him how to notch and back cut, and how to rig and pretension a line to make sure the tree didn't fall back and pinch his saw. I had to leave before they were finished for the day, but they seemed to be doing OK on their own.

The next day I saw his son making steep-angled back cuts, and pointed out what could happen and why he should make horizontal back cuts. He understood, and started making proper cuts.

A few weeks later as I passed their yard I saw that they had created a nice barber chair from a 24 inch tree. I asked if it had gotten "exciting" when that happened (yes), and pointed out why it probably happened. They said they had "pretensioned" the tree with a 1/2 inch cable and a 4WD truck. I pointed out the difference between pretensioning and overtensioning. They seemed to get it. I suggested that next time they want to work on a "difficult" tree they should give me a call. So far no injuries or property damage, and they have only a few trees left to deal with. I'm waiting for the call when they want to tackle the big silver maple in their front yard.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
We were working a job across from a church a few years ago. A guy walked over from the church and wanted an estimate. Fall one big dead pine and let it lay. I would have to set a line in it and set a block in the woods and pull it with the tractor. $50 since it's a church and I'm just across the street. That was evidently too expensive for this half a million dollar church and they said no thanks. In about 30 minutes here comes an old John Deere farm tractor flying down the road with another guy hanging off the back. Two church members that live nearby and they're farmers. In a few minutes I hear the saw. After a few minutes of sawing I hear them ramming the tree with the tractor repeatedly and I can see the top shaking violently. We walk over so we can see the show. He buzzes on the stump for quiet a while with the tractor constantly spinning and ramming the tree. Then I see it. They are using forks to push with. Straddling the tree. That's right, FORKS! Finally in a few minutes the tree starts falling exactly 90 degrees to the lay. Over the tractor goes. Slower than I would have thought. The saw man runs in the same direction as the falling tree and tractor. Barely gets out of the way. The tractor operator got flung in to the cab and a bolt or something punctured his head. He was hollering and bleeding everywhere. The tractor was trying to die and the wheels were spinning. The saw was running on the ground and the chain was spinning and then here comes the water. The limbs ruptured the water line to the church and a second water line to the parsonage.

The guy running the saw drug the tractor operator out of the tractor about the time the dust settled and we decided it might be safe to walk over. All this happened in about 20 seconds and we were about 100 yards away watching. We got the tractor operator in the truck and his buddy took him to the hospital.

I got the water meter tool and shut the water off. Cut the log out of in between the forks on the tractor. Moved the log. Took our tractor and pulled the loader of their tractor down. Pulled their tractor upright. By then the pastor showed up. The tractor driver was going to live. I still have pics somewhere of the entire mess. I told the preacher that I would have cut it for free if I'd known they were going to try it theirselves. I have about got to the point that I just walk away now. Makes me wonder what all I do that's out of my skillset just to save a few bucks.
That is quite the story! Amazing really. I could see every step happening as you told the story like I was there. Lucky guys really.

I have rescued many a people from themselves including saws stuck in a tree cut mostly through and pinched by a top swaying in the wind on top of a ladder. I've taken trees off of houses that looked like storm damage that wasn't. I've even climbed and removed trees that have killed my customers relatives when they had tried to do the job themselves. None of it makes me enjoy watching people try to tackle storm damage without proper training. It sucks to think that the things we all do and love can cause so much trouble for others.
 

Matthew Stone

Active Member
Location
Scranton
Wanted to chime in with a local home owner BIG FAIL that I saw a while ago. Next to a friends property, so I'm sure he got one of my cards. Bad picture but I didn't want to be rude.. it's cut and I'm guessing no wedge marks on the stump. This was about two months ago and there's still a large portion of it on the building. I have no issues with letting people destroy their own stuff, or possibly themselves. When you poke the bull you get the horns, so to speak. IMG_20200802_123637760.jpg
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
Wanted to chime in with a local home owner BIG FAIL that I saw a while ago. Next to a friends property, so I'm sure he got one of my cards. Bad picture but I didn't want to be rude.. it's cut and I'm guessing no wedge marks on the stump. This was about two months ago and there's still a large portion of it on the building. I have no issues with letting people destroy their own stuff, or possibly themselves. When you poke the bull you get the horns, so to speak. View attachment 69816
Quite common unfortunately. Damage isn't a worry of mine though. I feel the same as you there. I don't like the risk of injury or worse.
 

BoomBitch222

Active Member
Location
Roseville
I don’t know of any females that do this. In general I think females don’t have the ego that men have so they listen better and really make an effort to do things properly.
Not all of us lol My ego is what pushed me to attempt career paths that were not really typical for females and to do anything to excel no matter how hard or dangerous and it has served me well. That and knowing that without a degree, learning a trade was the only way to make good money. My ego is what made me step forward to take on anything that my co-workers were intimidated by because what actually happens when most females step into a male dominated arena is that we feel we have more to prove and thus, go harder.

However, I have always known the difference between being brave and being stupid. At work, I know when initiative is needed vs when someone is just looking for a person dumb enough to do something sketchy. I have tons of initiative but I do not supply stupidity.
Doing things that are out of my league has been my main track, but when attempting things like car repair, I usually get a mechanic friend to help. I would probably attempt small home projects but hire a professional for bigger things because I dont like ending up frustrated when I get in over my head with something.
Overall, we women are more prone to do difficult things to prove we can run with the big dogs but you’re correct that we are less likely to be reckless about it :)
 

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