Glued splices

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
It’s good practice to pucker, I hear it’s very healthy and some special bathhouses offer classes. Perhaps you could be a instructor in the subject
Damn. A fella goes to a "bathhouse" a few times and you'll never let him live it down ...
 

dspacio

New Member
Location
South County
I did boat-building with fiberglass and carbon-fiber seasonally for a few years. I have a few thoughts.

First impression is that sewn splices work.
It would be challenging to get epoxy to saturate rope, it would likely pour all over the place. If a syringe were poked between a few strands, one could get some.. but my hunch is that this would be a huge mess. A worn out, hairy rope would actually work better than a new smooth one.
There are types of carbon fiber cloth called "pre-preg" that has the resin already saturated within it. The material is kept refrigerated, and to set, it needs to be baked at high heat. I wouldn't do that to the rope.

this is how I would approach a "sewn" eye splice, with epoxy techniques:
Lay the rope out with the eye formed and rope tapered,
Cut a strip of fiberglass or even carbon fiber (looks bad-ass) about 2" (length of splice) by ~4" (~10 rope widths or something),
lay fiber on a metal/smooth work surface,
mix epoxy, soak and saturate glass/fiber, and do ones best to soak the rope area too,
wrap the glass/fiber tightly as possible around the splice area.
after it dried, sand smooth with 120

in boat-building, we use vacuum bags to get these kind of bonds to be super tight, and fully soaked with resin. This would be challenging/impossible on a soft substance like rope, because air would travel between fibers.
The process I described above, I would be very suspect of how it would hold up, as it is expecting a lot from glue bonding to the rope.
There could be some agent that would break bonds in the rope surface to get it ready to bond with resin... that's beyond my range, I do the part where the hands.. do the thing...

I can imagine other elaborate ways to carry this out. If the glass fiber weaved through the rope a bit, my confidence would raise a lot.
That said, I'm unsure of its practical utility. It could be pursued as a labor-intensive and totally indestructible option.

Epoxy can be irritating to work with outside of environments that are set up for it, in my experience.
That said, I was considering painting epoxy around a sewn splice just to protect it, because I forgot to put the rubber heatseal stuff on before closing the loop.

My impression is that the action of rope working with rope is known and trustworthy, more than attempting the chemical interactions needed for good gripping. We make up a lot of wild stuff in the boat world, yet bonding various materials together is not as free-wheeling.. some bonds are MUCH stronger than others.

Interesting to think about anyway. Maybe I will resin that little prusik stitch to see what happens.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
@dspacio Thanks for your insights and experiences

My idea for a glued splice is to use an adhesive that is much more flexible than an epoxy. More like what we know from silicone adhesives or sealers.

There are industrial adhesives that hold cars,, planes and ships together. How its done I have no clue. After seeing some of the applications it seems simple to glue ropes together...if there were a market. Right now, it might not be.

The 'how' of this in my vision is a two part mold that holds the rope in place. Then there are injectors that squirt the glue into the rope, surrounding all of the fibers. Vacuum and pressure injection seems to be the way to distribute the adhesive.

Splicing and sewing are amazing...what's next?

I read an article about how the ropes used in the parachute for one of the Mars rovers were tested. NASA shot a rocket with the test ropes packed away. At its apex the rocket stopped and the payload dropped back to earth. This is the only way they could generate enough impact to test the cordage and splices.

In about 2004 I was at the ACCT conference. Sterling rope was at the trade show. I had a discussion with a rep about sewing splices for arborists. The response was cool. The rep didn't seem at all interested. Fortunately they rethought the idea of sewn splices for arbos.
 

dspacio

New Member
Location
South County
@dspacio Thanks for your insights and experiences

My idea for a glued splice is to use an adhesive that is much more flexible than an epoxy. More like what we know from silicone adhesives or sealers.
...

The 'how' of this in my vision is a two part mold that holds the rope in place. Then there are injectors that squirt the glue into the rope, surrounding all of the fibers. Vacuum and pressure injection seems to be the way to distribute the adhesive.
I think you are spot on. clamp the mold over the ropes and figure how to squeeze it in there.
and it's true, epoxy is less strong to impacts, where other flexible adhesives exist.

it's always intriguing mixing the technologies across fields. the x-rings are a great example of that. next time I speak with my friend there I will ask him about it. he learned directly from the guys who invented vacuum-bagging for the America's Cup boats in lil Rhody. He creates all sorta weird set-ups to pump resin through incredibly strong bowsprits, beams, etc.
 

Joeybagodonuts

Well-Known Member
Location
Boondocks
@dspacio Thanks for your insights and experiences

My idea for a glued splice is to use an adhesive that is much more flexible than an epoxy. More like what we know from silicone adhesives or sealers.
That's the first thing I thought of.

Also, I do recall Mumford / @Yoyoman doing one of his break tests on a peice of cordage someone sent in with a glued eye splice. IIRC, I recall laughing at the idea, but in the end was surprised at how long it actually held on...
I have no idea which of his videos it was, but it's out there somewhere.
 

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