Rigging cookies for tight spots

rico

Well-Known Member
there's this too
I am placing an order with Wesspur on Monday and will have them throw one of these in with the order. I don't push off rounds or cookies very often but this tool looks very effective and easy to use..Plus its $30....I will let you know how it works. Looks like it might be good for flushing off stumps too....
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I am placing an order with Wesspur on Monday and will have them throw one of these in with the order. I don't push off rounds or cookies very often but this tool looks very effective and easy to use..Plus its $30....I will let you know how it works. Looks like it might be good for flushing off stumps too....
I've paired up with him and his crew a few times now. Never saw one leave the tool box..
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
I see a lot of videos and diagrams that have a flat cut for the cookies. Anything bigger than 24” in heavy wood I start angling the cookie cut towards the ground (unless they are to be used as garden steps etc) - only needs an angle of about 2-5 degrees and the sawdust acts as a lubricant and a gentle to moderate shove sends it on its way... as long as not angled too much will still roll well afterwards too...
 
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theatertech87

Well-Known Member
The whole reason for vertical speedlines is so you can push a chunk off and have it not bounce, if your aim is good , no need to worry about collateral damage

Not something to use every day or even every month, but for close quarters, it's awesome (use a rigging ring for best results)
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
I like all of the input!

@rico that is what I am doing. The issue is setting a tagline easily and quickly.
I don't want to fuck around and pinch a 36" bar in the air.
I haven't tried Tom's fiberglass rollers. I think I will make some and a little pouch to hold them and a couple of wedges.

@evo That is what it does. There will be a back slant on the next model's claws.
My tests were on half-seasoned wood. This springy green stuff needs different geometry on the claws. It's harder to drive than I want.
I am pleased with the performance today. I think I'm making one out of some 4140 I have laying around so that I can heat treat it and use it occasionally forever.

I'm also envisioning it being useful to set a point to lower my saw for fueling instead of having it hang from me.
I'll do some tests before I start doing dumber things like hanging a $1200 saw over groundies with it.
Don't lower anything like a saw over groundies.

Lower it, then have them come under.




If you let a lot of groundies, they will go under the downward load as soon as possible, and stand beneath it going up.



I don't understand how this works.
Is it a tool that you pound on with another tool, attached to a rope, letting you get two people involved to over-complicate a one-person job?
Even if you want help to pull the rounds, it seems way over-complicated. Then considering lowering saws when you can easily anchor to the bole...





Wooden dowels or teeter totter wedges or DK slider from Wesspur or a strip of Teflon all keep it one person doing a one person job, IMO.


$0.02
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
Yea I'm thinking vertical speedline or to girth a loop runner to the piece with a biner connecting it to the tagline or to cinch a peice of rope to it that's no big deal if it gets knicked.
 

Jemco

Well-Known Member
Vertical speedlines can be tricky, unless you fully understand how important it is to girth hitch each piece in a manner that can't loosen while free falling to the ground.

Personally I use duct tape at the girth hitch to make dang sure it stays snug n tight the whole journey.

Works a treat when yur boxed into tight quarters.

Jemco
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
Vertical speedlines can be tricky, unless you fully understand how important it is to girth hitch each piece in a manner that can't loosen while free falling to the ground.

Personally I use duct tape at the girth hitch to make dang sure it stays snug n tight the whole journey.

Works a treat when yur boxed into tight quarters.

Jemco

Or use a really long sling to circle the piece like a round-turn knot - makes it harder for the sling to slacken.

For dowels - I almost always still break up some dead twigs to inch/inch&half long and put in pocket and use them as kerf wedges and rolling dowels. Disposable/set&forget and no fiddling time with anything....
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Tying onto large diameter short length chunks is a lot of work and the choke can slip off

Bring along your cordless drill with a stout ⅝” diameter bit. Drill a hole about 3-4” in from the bark and down at a 45* angle. Like a toenail for framing. Thread your rope through, sometimes up and sometimes down. The chunk will flip differently Tie a stopper and off you go

You can go knotless by poking a sling Through the hole and choke it.

Vertical speed lining works great with a choked sling through a hole. Get creative with the drilled hole location and the top choke on the speed line. You can set it up to shove the chunk in one direction and have it slide down and end up in the other side of the trunk
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
I can't see a girth hitched loop runner just sliding off the chunck once the rope has been loaded up..if so use thinner runners, Or make slings sorta like the speedline slings my guy @swingdude makes with that NE Maxim tech cord.
 

Bart_

Active Member
Reg's jack handle cookie pusher never went into production though some number of prototypes may have got out into people's hands.
 

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