Canobase / canobasing

RyTheTreeGuy

Well-Known Member
Location
Canada
With a base tie you automatically have a retrieval leg and can do as many redirects as you please. Work the tree on the same line you ascend on.

What do you gain by adding a mid-line attachable friction saver?
The ability to not die if an irresponsible person cuts your anchor leg of rope...but you already eluded to conceding that point. I believe it was Lawrence Schultz who had his base line knicked when working a tree with multiple climbers. Scary stuff...but again not needed for every climb
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
I think the mid-line attachable friction saver is an option to migrate the anchor , just as setting the anchor with separarte a retrieving line attached, as you work the tree I guess for a better anchor position, or for useable rope length.
 

RyTheTreeGuy

Well-Known Member
Location
Canada
The picture is coming into focus. I’m guessing at some of the mechanics involved. The retrieval end remains on the ground in this orientation, and that is the end you pull at the end of the climb to retrieve the adjustable friction saver that you install mid climb?

Could someone please confirm that this is (aside from a theoretical possibility) a system that has to be installed mid climb?
You could set up your friction saver from the ground first and then ascend up to that point. From there lanyard in and advance (re-direct) your rope to a higher psp. However, it would have to be the perfect throw/union and therefore is probably more efficient to set up after you ascend your base tie.
 

RyTheTreeGuy

Well-Known Member
Location
Canada
I think the mid-line attachable friction saver is an option to migrate the anchor , just as setting the anchor with separarte a retrieving line attached, as you work the tree I guess for a better anchor position, or for useable rope length.
I agree, I also think that you just came up with another benefit...the ability to use a shorter length of rope.
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
I agree, I also think that you just came up with another benefit...the ability to use a shorter length of rope.
Not so long ago it wasn’t just shorter length of rope, or was to get higher into the tree with a shorter length of rope using natural anchor ddrt... yes a frowned upon technique now but necessary not so long ago...
 

Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
The one exception of course is making it tamperproof from ground people. Can't imagine working like that on any kind of regular basis, and if the base tie is in danger, so is any other section of rope left on the ground. I'd be pulling the whole damn rope up into the tree, not just the base tie.
That was my initial thought, but the more I think about this aspect it’s less about trust with groundie but more the exposed risk, including things you may rig down or bomb down that may impact your basal. Ive seen someone’s basal get somewhat effed when they bombed a top into it.

I see that no one is presenting this as an all or nothing approach, just another tool to use in certain situations. Just want to understand this more. Thanks for sharing everyone.
 

Tuebor

Well-Known Member
Location
Here
If you are on Instagram, do a search of #canobase and you will find a collection of photos and videos of canobase setups. A lot combine it with Big Ring Jammin' for a drop free retrieval of the friction saver.
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Location
Montana
Tree work can be very complex at times, however, when multiple possible solutions are available, I will lean in the direction of Occams-razer.

Simplicity will often enhance both speed and safety.

 

Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
If you are on Instagram, do a search of #canobase and you will find a collection of photos and videos of canobase setups. A lot combine it with Big Ring Jammin' for a drop free retrieval of the friction saver.
I left that black hole behind me. The only thing I do on the internet now is cruise the buzz and see what 80’s vehicles are for sale on Craigslist. A simpler life :)

If there are particularly instructive videos that folks have come across highlighting this technique, I’d love to watch!
 

Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
Baby’s first canobase today, tip weight in a spindly Chinese elm. This made sense to me, as an example of better than basal or canopy anchor. Not bc of ground activities but because of physics. And aside from spending an hour w a throwline (although that would be a fun experiment), I see how it is a system you set up once in the air.

I put a Texas tie off on the anchor and redirected into some tight crotches and retrieved it all from the ground.
edit. The more I think about it, setting this up from the ground doesn’t seem prohibitively difficult, and a bit of time with a throwline could save some time and a lot of effort climbing. You would just set the canopy in the lower union with a Texas tie off, send that all up, then get a shot that takes you to the spindly redirects above you were going to make, and send your tail through that. Now that I can conceive of both installing and retrieving this from the ground, with no special hardware, I’m going to keep exploring this.
 

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Tuebor

Well-Known Member
Location
Here
I've never seen the canobase done with anything other than a ring & ring friction saver.

Many will knot jam the larger ring. When you are ready to pull out your line, tie a throwline to the end. After the rope comes down the throwline will be threaded though the R&R: untie the throwline from the rope, tie on a retrieval ball, and pull the throwline up to catch the small ring and then lower the whole friction saver to the ground gently.
 

Tuebor

Well-Known Member
Location
Here
Behold The "Golden Retrieval" as demonstrated by Abdon with Barlett. Seems pretty simular to Canobasing...
That's really just the first step: setting a knot blocked SRT canopy anchor. If he redirected his climbing line higher through one or more unions before reconnecting to it, that would make it a canobase. Better demonstration here:

Canobase

(One problem finding canobase information is the variety of spellings: canobase, cannobase, canabase, etc)
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
Location
somewhere
That's really just the first step: setting a knot blocked SRT canopy anchor. If he redirected his climbing line higher through one or more unions before reconnecting to it, that would make it a canobase. Better demonstration here:

Canobase

(One problem finding canobase information is the variety of spellings: canobase, cannobase, canabase, etc)
Thanks for that video link Tuebor. It's the best video I've seen demonstrating the technique.
 

Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
Behold The "Golden Retrieval" as demonstrated by Abdon with Barlett. Seems pretty simular to Canobasing...
This was a missing link for me, thank you!
Better demonstration here:

Canobase

(One problem finding canobase information is the variety of spellings: canobase, cannobase, canabase, etc)

This was another missing link for me, thank you!
As the term derives from canopy + base, and canopy is not spelled cannopy or canapy, I would think canobase is the spelling eh?
 

Crazy_Jimmy

Well-Known Member
Location
Texas
I did these videos last year to show show some of the climber how to do the Cano base, golden retriver and flint locker , its starts around the 2 minute mark after the Golden retriever. One thing I would add is I always set my cano base below wide union so it cannot slide up .

Here's another video detailing the Golden Retriever setup and controlled retrieval .

one more demonstrating the flint locker with a fimbl climb
 

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