You Ever Work Solo?

Start tying the first piece at the end.
Tie pieces midline, until you're running out of rope. Use the end of the rope, run for the last piece.
Use s second rope that's a different color, start at the end...

A horizontal stub can be wrapped to lock the rope. After descent, flip off wraps until lowering friction is achieved.
Lower pieces until you are to friction-y, and flip off another wrap
Sounds like a daisy chain from hell! I like it. I like it alot
 
I roll solo on 99% of my jobs, everything from pruning to removals. I like being responsible for every aspect of the job, from the bid to the rake, and enjoy the problem solving it takes to rig single handed. Some will say solo tree work is too dangerous, but then there are the inevitable accidents that take shape when crew is involved. Another plus of solo tree work: who gets the dough.
Same here. Almost always solo. It is nice to have help when rigging but usually by myself. Always check in with home every once in awhile.
 
Okay so here it is.

Let’s say we are going to be rigging out the lowest limb. You’re going to secure the end of the rigging line onto a higher branch above it. Clipping it onto itself with a carabiner is fine, or a knot whatever.

Now you’re going to pick another spot and set up a pulley and run the other end of the line through, but leave some slack so you are essentially left with half a loop.

Now hook a sling onto the branch and clip onto that “half loop” of rigging line with carabiner.

You’re going to hold the end of the line coming out of the pulley and make your cut.

Lower the piece, pull the rope out of the pulley and out of the carabiner / sling and pull it back up and repeat the process with another sling.

It’s sort of almost like span rigging.

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Thats how i do it too. I use a stub or ring instead of a pully for some friction. Then i untie the end and pull it up. Had it get snagged before, used the other end of the rope till i ran out of length, called it day...
 

Jehinten

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Evansville
I made some slings. Tie the end higher, clip in the sling, wrap the rope on a stub and cut,. Lower to ground, untie end and pull it up and do it again.
That's a well used method called double whip. My only problem with it is on a full removal your brush pile builds up and the chance for your rope to get tangled on the retrieval goes up considerably. Not to mention the hardware that gets left behind in the brush.

Still a valuable technique and one that I'll use for just a couple of branches or when there's a groundie busy with another task who can retrieve the hardware when convenient.
 
That's a well used method called double whip. My only problem with it is on a full removal your brush pile builds up and the chance for your rope to get tangled on the retrieval goes up considerably. Not to mention the hardware that gets left behind in the brush.

Still a valuable technique and one that I'll use for just a couple of branches or when there's a groundie busy with another task who can retrieve the hardware when convenient.
U usually use 10 to 15 slings. I drop what i can and rig what i have to. I am the one chipping and cleaning up soni just make sure to gather my stuff. I have had the rope get tangled. That sucks. I try to lower gently and then when i drop the end try to toss it clear and pull quick. Sucks when it snags tho..
 

southsoundtree

Been here a while
Location
Olympia, WA
That's a well used method called double whip. My only problem with it is on a full removal your brush pile builds up and the chance for your rope to get tangled on the retrieval goes up considerably. Not to mention the hardware that gets left behind in the brush.

Still a valuable technique and one that I'll use for just a couple of branches or when there's a groundie busy with another task who can retrieve the hardware when convenient.
Natural-crotching with Double Whip Tackle and speedlines works, too. Saves on hardware.
 

MikoDel

New member
Location
SE PA
I'm a one-man show, small operation, and I work solo everyday. Only occasionally do I hire a 'young bull' when needed. Different rates for skilled vs. cleanup. Of course, my clients know this and I choose them, and they choose me, based on less (or no) cleanup on my part, and the scope of the work in total.

Really great stuff here. Always looking to maximize solo ability. A fig. 8 descender w/ears works well to tie off and tension limbs that need to be inspired in a particular direction. Fairly easy to release and of course lower. If I want to keep and re-use the lowering line, the piece has to be light enough to pull back up and untie. (But you can be sure that span method is next on my list!) Sometimes I'm hand-sawing off pieces to make it more manageable or chuckable so it lands away from lines, structures, etc. PITA !!!!
 

DSW

Location
Midwest
Rigging solo rarely seems to work out.

Speedline doesn't work in our trees. I've used traditional with both ends of the line, multiple lines, single line with midline knots, hanging to then piece up, span rigging.

They all kind of work to a degree but it's only a matter of time before the line is hung up or some insignificant snag puts a stop to the whole thing. Typically it won't take long. You're also not able to run a tag line, not effeciently at least.

Bombing pieces however works just as well whether there's anybody standing on the ground or not.
 

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