X ring or thimble

Hosocat

Active Member
Location
Alabama
Just starting to get into rigging rings. Any thoughts on the notch black x rings compared to the notch silver rigging thimble rings? The large x ring is about the same dimensions as the medium notch thimble ring. The thimble rings are cheaper. Is there any apprdciable difference in friction between the two?
 

Benjo75

Well-Known Member
Location
Malvern
The triple thimble is designed for adjustable aerial friction. Rings don't have a lot of friction. You'll still need basal friction. I've been using Safeblocs for a few years and love it. I've started using rings lately. Haven't tried the triple thimble yet. People seem to like it.
 

Benjo75

Well-Known Member
Location
Malvern
I see there are Notch thimble rings. I thought you were talking the triple thimble. The difference will be the coating. Different coatings will have different friction and different wear factor. I think the X rings have a really long lasting coat and that means less friction. Uncoated rings won't last as long but would have slightly more friction. Probably not enough to be noticeable though.
 

eyehearttrees

Active Member
Location
Tampa-Area
I have several of both and they both run the same, no wear and tear or worn out ones yet.
Same (have notch branded safebloc with the matte coating, x-branded rings w/ matte coating & with satin coating, and elevation canada rings w/ satin coating)

I think the lack of images online of worn-out anodization speaks volumes to how diesel the stuff is (last I checked there's that 1 torn-to-hell example, if you read its thread the guy was dragging lots of stuff in a gritty parking lot so was basically an expected result) I'm not that careful with mine anymore, after finding that lil dings don't "rapidly progress" like one may fear they would! (though to be fair I did recently get these large 1gal thick freezer bags to bring my nicer slings in, in fact I think I'm gonna use them today/now...am totally hesitating/procrastinating from a job/cut right now LOL)

Re the "friction level generated by varying coatings", the variance between brands (I'd bet anything) is of such little significance that your choice of bullrope would be a bigger factor in how much friction the rings see (and, therefore, how much they're helping slow/control the load) As the guy from Educated Climber says, paraphrased, It's about using multiple rings and IME if you have several easy to use units you can usually dial in whatever friction level you want (just not from 1 ring....check out the THT or the Safebloc if needing that, I use the latter as my final/terminal rigging point most of the time, usually with a 2-XL's sling 'feeding' the safebloc sling, and me frantically grabbing at the tail that enters the 2-XL's to get a grip on the line as I'm usually solo so the whole 'friction rigging' thing is huge for me!)

(OH!! While certainly not tested or anything, I will also say I have a very strong suspicion that higher elastic% ropes will work smoother in friction ring systems. And, while I'd already said that type of rope would be more relevant than type of anodization, in terms of friction between the two, something else to consider is diameter, for instance I'll often default to my 5/8 bullrope over the 1/2[same brand/type of bullrope, 'polydyne'] simply because the fatter rope, naturally, has more surface area for the friction system to act upon so for instance 3 holes in the Safebloc slows down 5/8 rope better than 1/2 rope :) )
 

Seth McPherson

New Member
Location
Cincinnati
I think most importantly on this subject is not necessarily the longevity of the ring but how well each responds to friction and the issue of generating too much heat. Rings that are not hard coat anodized don’t seem to last as long and heat up exponentially more in my experience. Rings that have been hard coat anodized will always be some variation of black because that is the color that the process leaves the aluminum, any other color has likely not gone through this process. Seems to me that the non hard coat rings will be at a high risk of early cycles to failure
 

laddo

Member
Location
New Orleans, LA
I think most importantly on this subject is not necessarily the longevity of the ring but how well each responds to friction and the issue of generating too much heat. Rings that are not hard coat anodized don’t seem to last as long and heat up exponentially more in my experience. Rings that have been hard coat anodized will always be some variation of black because that is the color that the process leaves the aluminum, any other color has likely not gone through this process. Seems to me that the non hard coat rings will be at a high risk of early cycles to failure

When it comes to rings.....I would listen to this guy ^


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
I think most importantly on this subject is not necessarily the longevity of the ring but how well each responds to friction and the issue of generating too much heat. Rings that are not hard coat anodized don’t seem to last as long and heat up exponentially more in my experience. Rings that have been hard coat anodized will always be some variation of black because that is the color that the process leaves the aluminum, any other color has likely not gone through this process. Seems to me that the non hard coat rings will be at a high risk of early cycles to failure

There was a guy who used to post here a lot. An innovator/inventor, he made a machine to run clean rope continuously through a ring and test its longevity. He could tell you time to failure in a single spot on each of the types/mfg of rings. I believe he would whole heartedly agree with you.


Also, just as a point of clarity, don't I recall that true hardcoat in is not anodizing at all.....harder than diamonds on the Rockwell Scale?
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
Oh... (can't edit my post.)

He also did checks with a digital thermometer every so often during test.

Did that with same log lifted by crane lowered, lifted relowered.

I'm so glad we had fun badgering that guy and chasing him and his unpublished information away. (Sarcastic voice.)
 

Seth McPherson

New Member
Location
Cincinnati
There was a guy who used to post here a lot. An innovator/inventor, he made a machine to run clean rope continuously through a ring and test its longevity. He could tell you time to failure in a single spot on each of the types/mfg of rings. I believe he would whole heartedly agree with you.


Also, just as a point of clarity, don't I recall that true hardcoat in is not anodizing at all.....harder than diamonds on the Rockwell Scale?
I have an idea who you’re talking about and great point of clarity!
 

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Climbing Innovations
Top Bottom