Would you climb this?

Mwelander

New Member
Location
Karlstad Sweden
I have a pine tree that has some degree of rot, it's leaking at a position about 3m up from the ground. It also has a few slight bends.

Would you consider this a high risk project to climb or is it plenty strong still?

It's got branches leaning over the house so taking it down piece by piece is the best option, and I want to save the tree next to it. Owner of the forest next to my yard has offered to take it down using heavy machines since they are coming through anyways to take stuff down on his side, but then I'll loose the pretty tree right next to it. IMG_20190318_131053.jpg IMG_20190318_130853.jpg IMG_20190318_130843.jpg
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
If I am worried about a tree the best way I have found to check how safe a tree is to climb is to see it move in the wind. Plenty of trees I have checked this way, and also checked at at what windspeed or wind direction the tree starts to look unstable as it moves...
 

Mwelander

New Member
Location
Karlstad Sweden
If I am worried about a tree the best way I have found to check how safe a tree is to climb is to see it move in the wind. Plenty of trees I have checked this way, and also checked at at what windspeed or wind direction the tree starts to look unstable as it moves...
How do you mean that it tells you whether it's safe, like what do you look for specifically? Should it sway much in the wind or not to be safe?
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
I particularly look for the spot on the trunk that moves wrongly. If I can take the top from there great, but if I need to go higher, choose a day with low wind and take small. Use a remote TIP if available.

I did get caught once where wind gusts showed up hours early, and when the top started to wobble I froze and prepped to dive out the way of the expected falling top as I knew where the fault was located. Luckily it held.
 

Mwelander

New Member
Location
Karlstad Sweden
I particularly look for the spot on the trunk that moves wrongly. If I can take the top from there great, but if I need to go higher, choose a day with low wind and take small. Use a remote TIP if available.

I did get caught once where wind gusts showed up hours early, and when the top started to wobble I froze and prepped to dive out the way of the expected falling top as I knew where the fault was located. Luckily it held.
You guys have a crazy cool job. I'm just learning the basics so far
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
You guys have a crazy cool job. I'm just learning the basics so far

No issue with starting from basics. I learned from forums and YouTube as I was lead solo climber from day one. Just learn to say no when you get really unsure, and ask/seek advise - it’s easy now with forums like this...
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
Should also note that as you clean the tree to be able to cleanly lower upper limbs, you are lions tailing the tree that makes it more susceptible to failure when loading. If it looks bad from the ground, it’s gonna get worse as you delimb it (unless it is totally dead then it is nearly as bad as it gets anyway)

If it has a fault make sure you have a way of escape planned.
 

Bucknut

Well-Known Member
If worried you could just tie into the healthy tree behind it. Could also set a rigging line in the tree behind. That way everything swings away from the house. Although there looks to be plenty of room to let a lot of it fly.
 

KWolt

Member
Location
Sanford
I have a pine tree that has some degree of rot, it's leaking at a position about 3m up from the ground. It also has a few slight bends.

Would you consider this a high risk project to climb or is it plenty strong still?

It's got branches leaning over the house so taking it down piece by piece is the best option, and I want to save the tree next to it. Owner of the forest next to my yard has offered to take it down using heavy machines since they are coming through anyways to take stuff down on his side, but then I'll loose the pretty tree right next to it. View attachment 58252 View attachment 58253 View attachment 58254
FYI- that looks like a spruce to me.
 

KWolt

Member
Location
Sanford
Oh, okay, like in Newfoundland larches are cedars. And in Europe limes are Tilias but here that’s a citrus.
There’s a lot of good advice here on the soundness of this tree. I consider how it has held up in high winds. I figure if it can stand up to that it can support me on a calm day as long as I don’t have to rig anything substantial off of it.
Over time you tend to trust your gut. I think anyone with any experience will agree that a tree will tell you how safe it is once you’re in it. The bad ones have this kind of sickening movement to them. But that’s not something that can be quantified.
 

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