Workshop Luck

Bart_

Active Member
Had a muffler with stainless studs that did their commensurate amount of damage coming apart, which was only going to happen with torch help. The stainless nuts were easy to dress with a tap but the studs were too close to allow a die handle to work, even after you screw out the rod handles. Round dies too. And metric stud. So, enter luck. I had to save some downward studs on a car manifold a year or two back and made a 1" round die holder with thin sidewalls to get past the engine block and a center hole to roughly match my 3/8" drive extension using a set screw to catch the drive tip flat. As I was digging through my box of metric this darn silver thing got in the way. At first I didn't recognize it. Then I found the M8 die and spotted the match up. Bingo, the first time I used the die holder on the bench. Without it I was euchered or doomed to vice grips etc. And the biggest irony was I bought that M8 die specially for the car fix.

Moral of the story - making special tools can pay off. With some luck.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Please post a pic of your tap holder.

Custom tools are treasures. Even if they're only used on one job.

Angus MacGuyver is the Patron Saint of Makers.

@Bart_
 

Bart_

Active Member
Tom here's pics

IMG_6278.JPG IMG_6279.JPG
IMG_6280.JPG IMG_6281.JPG

The flat was to clear the block casting. I just grabbed a die for the pic. Let me know If I faux'ed any pas on file size.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
@Bart_

Very nice!

I bet someone makes a die holder like that...for $!!! money

tacking the die to a deep socket might work too. For one-offs like this it seems that a Harbor Freight purchase would be a good value.

I wish I knew machining. In my next life I will
 

Bart_

Active Member
If you knew the price and pita of getting machine tool stuff you'd have a crap. Fortunately I'm coasting on my reservoir of equipment as prices just keep going up. And driving 30 minutes each way, best case, to pay $$$, if they've got it, no choice in quality. I stay cheap, preserve what I've got. Learning to sharpen whatever possible is a good skill. Cut slow, don't fry your tools. And you can Macgyver tools evenings and weekends when shops are closed. I think I waited a week for the one metric die and almost left the store saying never again when I paid. Time heals wounds like that. Then you go back. It was that or car manifold off $$$, jeopardy, and pita

So yeah the HF part is cheap but the other part not and not really modifiable to retain its integrity (hardening and distortion), but I appreciate your good intention.
 
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