Widespread Ash Issues?

Hi everyone and thanks in advance.

I am quite confident that our city's green ash (Frax. pennsylvanica) suffered a considerable amount of frost damage at the end of May and is what is causing the current state of affairs. We're zone 3b so it's not uncommon. Buds and shoots are brown, dry, and crusty however the branches are still alive. Some trees are pushing leaves and others still look quite bare. My doubt comes from the fact that some streets have trees with excellent ash right next to bare ones... I would really appreciate a second opinion on this. Can frost set trees back this far? It only seems to be the ash.

Other thoughts are cottony ash psyllid which we have plenty of but those generally cause leaf deformation as a symptom and only really hit the black and European ash hard.

We have EAB here however this is widespread and I am confident it is not to blame for this damage.

Anthracnose is also quite bad here too though the symptoms are not quite that either. **I am beginning to think it may actually be anthracnose but would like a second opinion**

The first photo shows the plethora of little guys who I believe are the "ash plant bug" (Tropidosteptes amoenus), second one is of the suspected frost damage, and the third is an example of the kind of reduction in canopy we're seeing this year. Fourth photo is a neighbouring ash tree that is in full canopy.

I've done branch sampling for both EAB and vascular wilts with no signs of anything. **I will be doing more branch sampling this week**. A wide variety of planting depths all experiencing the same sort of fluctuation in canopy. There is a minor presence of scale insects and as I said before, anthracnose is ubiquitous.

Any comments or ideas would be appreciated.
 

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Honestly that's what I've been telling residents - these things are alive, there are ump-teen different things that attack them, and ultimately we need to have patience. Yes, they're ugly and going to be removed eventually but just reeelax. Majority of the effected ones are not of a concerning size either.
 

Jonny

Been here a while
Location
Buffalo
If it is anthracnose ( and I’m leaning towards it for this tree), it might be just fine even with the ugly fungus.
Not usually a death sentence, like EAB, right?
 
It's not usually a death sentence but I fear that it has developed into anthracnose cankers as I have certainly seen some lesions I thought could have just been regular ol' street tree damage. I'll be spending more time looking this week.
 
You betcha. I work for the city. Newly Registered Professional Forester and just waiting until COVID restrictions are lifted to write my ISA exam for the Certified Arborist. I'm the bug guy so I get all the investigative arborist work
 
As an update;

We were able to destructively sample an ash that looked a lot like the one in the earlier photo - maybe a handful of leaves, all pushed as epicormic shoots.

What I found only produces more questions. We found no staining in the sapwood nor any borer galleries. We did find that the tree had many coin-like growths on it that would appear as slightly depressed areas of the bark with a pimple like centre. When removing the bark, the sapwood was altered in a circular way reminiscent of a target canker. Looking around makes it seem like it could be a eutypa canker but nothing says that ash can act as host and that looks far more vigorous. I also think it could be some sort of gall but no larvae / eggs / exit holes were visible to suggest that.

The first photo shows the external symptoms of this phenomenon while the second depicts what it looks like under the bark. The deformation goes all the way to the cambium. Third photo is side-by-side. Some of the branches had enough of these that if they are capable of it, could be girdling them.
 

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JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
As an update;

We were able to destructively sample an ash that looked a lot like the one in the earlier photo - maybe a handful of leaves, all pushed as epicormic shoots.

What I found only produces more questions. We found no staining in the sapwood nor any borer galleries. We did find that the tree had many coin-like growths on it that would appear as slightly depressed areas of the bark with a pimple like centre. When removing the bark, the sapwood was altered in a circular way reminiscent of a target canker. Looking around makes it seem like it could be a eutypa canker but nothing says that ash can act as host and that looks far more vigorous. I also think it could be some sort of gall but no larvae / eggs / exit holes were visible to suggest that.

The first photo shows the external symptoms of this phenomenon while the second depicts what it looks like under the bark. The deformation goes all the way to the cambium. Third photo is side-by-side. Some of the branches had enough of these that if they are capable of it, could be girdling them.
Kind of reminds me of 1000 cankers on walnut
 
Kind of reminds me of 1000 cankers on walnut
Wow, that seems really similar! In discussion with a professor at the local university, he suggested a wound response to a piercing / sucking insect but symptoms and method of origin of the thousand canker disease is very comparable. Also, the sports appeared to have growth rings suggesting a perennial canker.

Thanks for this lead, I'll discuss it further with him.
 

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