Which injection system and why?

rfwoodvt

Well-Known Member
Been using Mauget for the past few years and frankly I'm not at all pleased with the speed of uptake, frequent lack of uptake, and cracking capsules upon pressurization.

I want to change to something else that is quicker, less finicky and more reliable in delivery. Just wanted to get a feel for what folks like and dislike about the other injection systems out there. I apprecaite the input!
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Mauget...drill the hole with recommended bit, pressurize the cap with a pliar/vicegrip with tongues...set the tubes...then, and this is what makes the dif, take a thin piece of cable that just fits in the tube, and ram rod the tube like a blackpowder gun...then lightly tap the pressurized cap onto the tube with the drill til the membrane breaks but doesn't drive the tube to the end of the hole. The tube being larger than the hole as it enters...doesn't quite get to the end of the hole, and the ram rodding makes the xylem available instead of being blocked by frass. 2 man operation and me and my gm can knock out some serious injections proven by 5 years of MASS eab injections...all successful. Imicide early then Bidrin late.

In early years I had bad luck with transport til the ramrod I figured out. Last year Mauget colored the imicide dark so success or failure is much more evident. DSCF1712.JPG
 
Last edited:

802climber

Active Member
Can anyone speak to the Arborjet VS Rainbow thing?

Plastic plugs, good or bad? Do the wounds heal/look better without plugs? Does any chemical leak out? And do the plugs provide any level of protection against pathogens entering through the injection sites?

You can tell someone has been wandering around in Hartford..
 

Sam Barnes

New Member
I messed around with all of the systems a few trees, and I think that the Arborjet is the way to go with the plugs, it gives a surface for the tree to lay down wound wood over as well as if you set the plugs properly no leaking, with the plugless systems both rainbow and Mauget, tree tech and the like, the amount that leaks out would be enough to pay for the plugs. I personally just think it looks more professional to have a sealed hole.


Full disclosure I work for Sherrill tree also I use tree tech and Mauget at my house only because I have 1 or 2 trees to treat at a time, if I was doing it for 5 or more trees i'd go Arborjet.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Wrong. (re Nick) I began using Mauget in 1971...if done on the right day in the proper method...they don't need ANY psi. Gravity fed into xylem is plenty good enough on the proper day.

Mauget you can stick em and leave em and go about your business. They all work but Mauget is easier, cheaper, less expensive initial out of pocket and...again...much faster to complete and go on to other work/injections.

I have been to Ajet seminars and watched them agonize over completing the tedious process not to mention getting the stuff in difficulties.

I have never had a drop leak from the Mauget system if done properly. Where do you come up with this stuff?
 

treegazer

Member
I've used most of the injection systems out there. The main thing I do NOT like about the Mauget capsules is the waste. I do like the closed system and the reduced chemical exposure.
Tree IV is very efficient and is what I would have recommended until I started using the ChemJet injectors.

http://www.mauget.com/index.cfm?PageID=26&ID=2&productid=19

Like the Tree IV, you can fill them with what you want (which does increase exposure potential), you can leave them if you have to, and there is no waste. Start up cost for equipment is similar to Tree IV but ChemJet is a much less complicated system with no expense of plugs. Same drill bit as used for Mauget capsules.
 
The wedgle is very fast. Can be tricky in really thin or super thick barked trees. Been having some issues with it leaving wounds behind a couple years later. Maybe due to slow water uptake if done during a drought and now watering the trees after? Anyone have a solution to this? We've been thinking about going to a new system but would rather make this one work.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Like I said earlier, I get very LITTLE waste (noted by colored material) with adding a brief additional step of plunging out the tubes after set and not set at the END of the hole. Also don't inject in crevices or above cankers or on top of old sites...common sense stuff. If I do sustain poor uptake I just reset and don't do often but usually have success the second site.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
The wedgle is very fast. Can be tricky in really thin or super thick barked trees. Been having some issues with it leaving wounds behind a couple years later. Maybe due to slow water uptake if done during a drought and now watering the trees after? Anyone have a solution to this? We've been thinking about going to a new system but would rather make this one work.
Wounds probably caused by cell compression/vascular damage from pressure?
 

treegazer

Member
Like I said earlier, I get very LITTLE waste (noted by colored material) with adding a brief additional step of plunging out the tubes after set and not set at the END of the hole. Also don't inject in crevices or above cankers or on top of old sites...common sense stuff. If I do sustain poor uptake I just reset and don't do often but usually have success the second site.
Just to clarify what I was referring to by waste. I did not mean waste of chemical, I meant waste of plastic, as in all of the trash generated from the capsules themselves.
 

Jerry_Grandjean

New Member
As far as the Wedgle leaving wounds, I've heard from some researcher folks that in some cases the pressure from the material injection blows the bark off the trunk, creating a 'bubble' under the bark. This may be the dead areas that you are seeing.
As far as preference, I've been using the Rainbow Q-Connect which seems to me to be the ArborJet without the plugs. I've injected mostly ash trees and the system works great. I bought 2 complete units and 4 extra injector T's. I can either do 2 trees at a time with up to 12 injection sites or break it down to do 3 smaller trees at a time. It's a lot of work running back and forth between trees, but if the trees are close, you can really get a lot done. I've seen a demo with Rainbow's emamectin benzoate which is thinner than TreeAge and takes up noticably much quicker. I get very minimal waste. Any material left in the line is pressurized and injected back into the service container.
I haven't used Mauget recently, but I've had a lot of difficulty with uptake in my many times using it in the past. I'm just not a big fan.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
As far as the Wedgle leaving wounds, I've heard from some researcher folks that in some cases the pressure from the material injection blows the bark off the trunk, creating a 'bubble' under the bark. This may be the dead areas that you are seeing.
.
That is what I said.

As far as Mauget is concerned...results speak for themselves and in my vicinity...Mauget injections are keeping a lot of ash alive with very little failure and most of that is late start and improper tech.

Last note to self...EmBen IS TreeAge. You need to do a little more reading and a little more research prior to posting. Too many knowledgeable peeps on this forum to get away with careless info :endesacuerdo:
 

rfwoodvt

Well-Known Member
I've used most of the injection systems out there. The main thing I do NOT like about the Mauget capsules is the waste. I do like the closed system and the reduced chemical exposure.
Tree IV is very efficient and is what I would have recommended until I started using the ChemJet injectors.

http://www.mauget.com/index.cfm?PageID=26&ID=2&productid=19

Like the Tree IV, you can fill them with what you want (which does increase exposure potential), you can leave them if you have to, and there is no waste. Start up cost for equipment is similar to Tree IV but ChemJet is a much less complicated system with no expense of plugs. Same drill bit as used for Mauget capsules.
Funny, I've been using mauget for about 3 years and had never heard ofthe chem-jet thing. will have to check it out.
 

NickfromWI

Well-Known Member
...if done on the right day in the proper method...they don't need ANY psi. Gravity fed into xylem is plenty good enough on the proper day...I have never had a drop leak from the Mauget system if done properly. Where do you come up with this stuff?
On the right day? That's what I'm saying. My client needs their trees injected on Dec 3. So I'm gonna line up my crew for that day. You're implying that if I wake up and the humidity isn't right and the moon is not in proper alignment, I gotta NOT inject the trees.

I'm not saying Mauget CANT work. I just need something more reliable. Its 11:43pm. I can go inject whatever I want right now.


love
nick
 
Top