When to retire a rope

Harrison_smith

New Member
Location
Memphis
My Yale 11.7 Poison HiVi now has several areas that look like the pictured photo. All from handsaw nicks. None of the frays penetrate deeply but wanted advice on whether to retire.
 

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Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
If there are several places that look like that, I would personally replace it. I am very particular about my ropes, I don’t put up with much damage before I replace them. How much does a rope cost? And how much is a hospital visit plus three months in bed waiting for the casts to come off?
 

27RMT0N

Active Member
Location
WA
I came across an interesting video on the subject, they use a Yale 16-strand rope and cut 1, then 2, 3, 4, 5, etc all the way to 16 strands and break test the ropes:

 
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oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Location
Alorgia
If there are several places that look like that, I would personally replace it. I am very particular about my ropes, I don’t put up with much damage before I replace them. How much does a rope cost? And how much is a hospital visit plus three months in bed waiting for the casts to come off?
Or the other alternative you dont make it to the hospital.
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
Location
Barbados
My Yale 11.7 Poison HiVi now has several areas that look like the pictured photo. All from handsaw nicks. None of the frays penetrate deeply but wanted advice on whether to retire.
No disrespect but stop nicking the fuc ing....rope. learn to manage your tail and especially what you are hanging off of. Retire now and replace. Rope is cheap.
 

Anawan

Member
Location
Asheville
How many years will y’all go before retiring a life load rope? I’m running with a 4 year old rope (all gear rocket) that feels like it has aged well like a fine cheese. When you get through that many climbs you develop a lot of trust...
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
How many years will y’all go before retiring a life load rope? I’m running with a 4 year old rope (all gear rocket) that feels like it has aged well like a fine cheese. When you get through that many climbs you develop a lot of trust...
Depends on how much you use it. Daily use rope? Might last a year around here. Occasional use/spare? Maybe 5 or so before I decide it’s just getting a little old for my liking. I’m not too adventurous though, I tend to replace ropes/gear frequently.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
Location
Lancaster, PA
How many years will y’all go before retiring a life load rope? I’m running with a 4 year old rope (all gear rocket) that feels like it has aged well like a fine cheese. When you get through that many climbs you develop a lot of trust...
Anawan, The first section is not directed at you. You just served as a catalyst. I'll answer your question directly though.

VenusNursery nailed it. As soon as you question it... Get a new rope.

Exceptions. Of course. Perhaps you don't have enough experience to make a good judgment on the ability of the rope to hold you aloft. O.K. pretty simple. Stay on the ground and master your shit before going up. Keep reading, keep asking, keep learning. Anything worth learning and knowing takes time.

In a hurry? Find another hobby/profession.

Anawan,

Like stated so much depends on circumstances. Let's go from the basis you are an average climber, with good skills and in general, take reasonable care of your rope/equipment. Having said that, if you climb more than once a week on it, a 4-year-old rope is a bit much. Sunlight alone will take it's toll, rain, mold dirt...

Are you going to die from your 4-year-old rope breaking? Most likely not. Is how we do anything; how we do everything? Yes, most definitely.

Define trust. We could get transcendental here! Charles Feldman has a good definition. “Trust is choosing to make something important to you vulnerable to the actions of someone else."

Let's apply that to your rope. Let's take out the last 2 words and replace it with "something."

The decision is yours. I just ask you to weigh the consequences of rope failure to the cost of rope.

Here was my plan when I climbed full time for many years.
I had three ropes.
1. New, 200' Sunday go to meeting rope. I used it on big trees on nice days.
2. The workhorse rope. Started at 200', but was probably a bit shorter, a bit dirtier than rope #1, but very serviceable. This rope I used 85% of the time.
3. Gunk rope. Rainy days, sappy trees, dog shit-filled lawn kinda rope.

Every year I purchased a new rope. It became # 1 and the rest shifted down accordingly. For more than two decades, I bought one rope a year. (of course the first three years I had to build up!)

Did I screw up and wreck ropes before their time. Of course, but it was the exception, not the rule. And if a rope was retired early it was my fault, not the rope's

All things considered, a rope is a high ROI tool.

My .02

Tony
 

Anawan

Member
Location
Asheville
Anawan, The first section is not directed at you. You just served as a catalyst. I'll answer your question directly though.

VenusNursery nailed it. As soon as you question it... Get a new rope.

Exceptions. Of course. Perhaps you don't have enough experience to make a good judgment on the ability of the rope to hold you aloft. O.K. pretty simple. Stay on the ground and master your shit before going up. Keep reading, keep asking, keep learning. Anything worth learning and knowing takes time.

In a hurry? Find another hobby/profession.

Anawan,

Like stated so much depends on circumstances. Let's go from the basis you are an average climber, with good skills and in general, take reasonable care of your rope/equipment. Having said that, if you climb more than once a week on it, a 4-year-old rope is a bit much. Sunlight alone will take it's toll, rain, mold dirt...

Are you going to die from your 4-year-old rope breaking? Most likely not. Is how we do anything; how we do everything? Yes, most definitely.

Define trust. We could get transcendental here! Charles Feldman has a good definition. “Trust is choosing to make something important to you vulnerable to the actions of someone else."

Let's apply that to your rope. Let's take out the last 2 words and replace it with "something."

The decision is yours. I just ask you to weigh the consequences of rope failure to the cost of rope.

Here was my plan when I climbed full time for many years.
I had three ropes.
1. New, 200' Sunday go to meeting rope. I used it on big trees on nice days.
2. The workhorse rope. Started at 200', but was probably a bit shorter, a bit dirtier than rope #1, but very serviceable. This rope I used 85% of the time.
3. Gunk rope. Rainy days, sappy trees, dog shit-filled lawn kinda rope.

Every year I purchased a new rope. It became # 1 and the rest shifted down accordingly. For more than two decades, I bought one rope a year. (of course the first three years I had to build up!)

Did I screw up and wreck ropes before their time. Of course, but it was the exception, not the rule. And if a rope was retired early it was my fault, not the rope's

All things considered, a rope is a high ROI tool.

My .02

Tony
Thanks for the thoughtful reply. You went deep, and I like that. I think when it comes to climb ropes, the answer is always within the question- if you have to ask whether or not a rope can be used, why still use it? This particular rope, I feel like it has aged well like a fine cheese and plan to keep it in circulation. I have a much newer rope I use on the daily and I think it’s time to get a third. I like your system.

As I expected there’s quite a variety of opinions on this- from 1 year to 10. Funny that something that should be cut and dry is actually so subjective.

Bad choice of words. not cut, just dry.
 

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