What's your preference of Rigging Ring slings?

Reach

Well-Known Member
We run single and double ring slings on 5/8 and 3/4” Tenex, for rigging with both 1/2 and 5/8” rope, and have been very happy with them. The linked setup there does not seem terribly useful to me.

Call Ray down at Gap Arborist Supply (www.gaparboristsupply.com) and tell him what you’re going to be doing with it and he will tell you what you need, and can make them up for you the way you/he feel will beat suit you.
 

theatertech87

Well-Known Member
I find myself using medium and large ring and ring retrievable slings most frequently. Hands down. I've got a 3 foot and a 6 foot version and I use them both about equally. Another benefit is I'd you get a triple thimble spliced up in a loop you can attach it like a prussik to get remotely retrievable aerial friction ;)

After that I've got a pair of single ring ultra slings, and a dead eye ring sling, they don't get used as much, one is about 12 feet looking and I use it to fairlead a grcs. Way overkill for anything else. Don't use any of them that often, but they have their place.

Never played with a double head sling, but I can't see much added benefit over one of the extra large rings.

To be fair, I also use blocks about as frequently as slings, kind of depends on mood, the tree, and what kind of work I'm doing
 

808Climber

New Member
Mahalo (thank you) for the responses, I really appreciate it. I know multiple ring slings are ideal and of various lengths. The linked ring sling is designed to be remotely set and retrieved (with 2 large rings and 1 beast/XL ring) and since it has 3 rings will provide proper bend radius for the rigging rope. In an old video of David Driver he says that you should have the rigging rope running through a minimum of 3 rings for terminal rigging or 2 beast rings I believe for proper bend radius. I'm also thinking of these set ups:
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
A single large ring on an ultra sling does the vast majority of my rigging. A single medium ring on an ultra gets used a lot as well. If I'm doing heavy negative rigging, I switch to a block on a dead eye sling. The double headed thing is cool, but it makes the expense of the tool go way up quickly.

Buy the black XRRs. They don't wear as quickly.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
The most versatile in my view is the double beast rings as a 15' dead eye. I've progressed through a lot of iterations, so part of me wonders if we all just have a favorite for a time and place. Pay attention to what makes you feel comfortable.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
The 2 large, 1 beast ring sling you first posted looks like a good idea, but does not hold up in execution. You either need a union, need to cut a kerf, or have a small enough trunk to wrap all the way around, at which point you wouldn’t need that particular sling anyway. I’ve used it a lot, trying to justify it, and eventually butchered it for the rings.

The rig n’ ring is great, as is the ring on the loop paired with a larger ring on a dead eye sling. Both are retrievable and are reasonable for a greater variety of scenarios.
 

808Climber

New Member
So it's ok to rig with just the rig n ring? What's people's experiences with the original black anodized X rigging rings compared to the newer non-anodized rings? Supposedly the anodization can crack/chip which can then fray/cut rope? Also, any opinions on the safebloc vs. thundersling vs tribloc/triple thimble?
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
Between rings, it comes down to preference. I think you get more friction with the non-coated, but more wear. The coated can chip, but generally not if you take care of them and don’t chuck them to the ground.

I’ve not used the thundersling or safebloc, but the triple thimble is a favorite. Between it and the safebloc, the TT is more compact, more versatile, and eliminates the possibility of rope on rope friction. You can use one of the holes to span the TT between stems, and still have two holes for friction.

Between it and the thundersling, the TT is again more compact and versatile, and is also rated for much higher loads.

There can be a lot of friction when hauling the tail back to the climber, but if the climber and ground hand work together it’s not too bad. Also, you have to watch for pinching the rope against the stem, which can add too much friction. A little practice and planning help. Otherwise, it helps two-man teams pull off three-man scenarios.
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
So it's ok to rig with just the rig n ring? What's people's experiences with the original black anodized X rigging rings compared to the newer non-anodized rings? Supposedly the anodization can crack/chip which can then fray/cut rope? Also, any opinions on the safebloc vs. thundersling vs tribloc/triple thimble?
I have grooved the medium blue allgear ring pretty well. I'm supposed to put a picture of it up somewhere. I'm going with the black hard anodized ones from now on. I wouldn't waste my time on the plain aluminum with only the natural thin coating of aluminum oxide. I'd bet stiffer ropes cut right into them. (I know someone is gonna call bullshit. I'm not spending the money to find out)
 

theatertech87

Well-Known Member
So it's ok to rig with just the rig n ring? What's people's experiences with the original black anodized X rigging rings compared to the newer non-anodized rings? Supposedly the anodization can crack/chip which can then fray/cut rope? Also, any opinions on the safebloc vs. thundersling vs tribloc/triple thimble?
My vote is for the triple thimble over the safebloc. It adds about half a porta wrap wrap in friction

As for wear, I have a couple anodized and a couple non anodized and I've never seen noticable wear (granted I'm not blasting down big wood every day)
 

colb

Well-Known Member
So it's ok to rig with just the rig n ring?
That's a bit too much of a blanket statement.

No spar blocking, which is rigging.

For normal canopy rigging, it works fairly well, but an omni 2.0 (or better yet, three omni 2.0 for redirects) will be better. But, the omni 2.0 is (just like the rig n ring) not suited for negative rigging.

Where the rig n ring gets really groovy is with remote retrieved anchors, for span rigging between the tree you are rigging and a second tree. If you install a remote rigging point, dead end the rigging line below the cut, then rig the limb to an omni 2.0 on a sling (or speedline clip), you can get a lot of movement away from roofs, with a lot of good force dispersion (but, consider side pull forces). Hope this helps.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
A Beast Whoopie and a Beast Deadeye should cover just about anything we are gonna see in our day to day lives. Love em both...
 
A Beast Whoopie and a Beast Deadeye should cover just about anything we are gonna see in our day to day lives. Love em both...
I figured if I added a medium or large ring on a prussic to a dead eye beast, it could function like a friction saver does for a climb line and be retrievable remotely
 

MapleLeafRopes

New Member
So it's ok to rig with just the rig n ring? What's people's experiences with the original black anodized X rigging rings compared to the newer non-anodized rings? Supposedly the anodization can crack/chip which can then fray/cut rope? Also, any opinions on the safebloc vs. thundersling vs tribloc/triple thimble?
Just an FYI from several discussions with Harken (the maker of the X Rigging rings/Safebloc) they haven't actually been able to replicate the whole crack fraying the rope thing. I have heard from Treestuff that it's possible but only in discussions comparing the X Rigging rings to the unfinished Notch rings. They usually also mention that the unfinished rings can be made smooth again by a light sanding where any damage to the X Ring is permanent.

Having said that when we had Harken make the big ring their way for us (with their logo on it because it looks way cooler) we collectively decided to do the harder, shiny coating on it instead of the matte finish. It feels a lot like the finish on the Safebloc. Was more of a function vs fashion thing. We have not been able to replicate this "cracking" thing on that or the smaller sizes. I'm sure it's possible but you would have to be pretty hard on the gear. Hope that helps.

-Jason
 

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eyehearttrees

Active Member
@808Climber I like the general approach you're taking in fact I was just at that point myself a couple months ago when I thought "I need a heavy-duty kit" for rigging and in fact the 1st item I bought was that 3-ringed 5' sling you linked (and a loose Safebloc that's now spliced-into 3/4 polydyne)

I like the selection you post in #4 however as @burtonbc1400 mentions about the tail length & prusik I think you should give that some serious thought, the thing is that while rings aren't mid-line attachable, they are mid-line moveable, you lose this ability with whoopies or loops though because you can't just untie the sling and slide the ring along the rope with you...

Would you consider splicing your own ropes? Following Samson's amazing video tutorial on youtube you could easily splice your own, doing smaller & tighter ropes (like many climbing lines) is more difficult (still usually not too bad) however stuff like 5/8 and 3/4 polydyne is a breeze!! IF/once able to splice, not only will you always be able to do spliced-ends on your bull line, thus enabling you to get full strength out of the line, but you can make all your own slings for WAY less than those pre-made units and you can make them with superior cordage (polydyne! Though Atlas, Nystron, Double Esterlon are all significantly more-elastic, and thus more dynamic-force-capacity, than tenex, Yale's short-but-complete article on it summarizes dynamic-versus-static beautifully http://www.yalecordage.com/featured-industries/arborculture/dynamic-energy-arborist-rope
So while polydyne 3/4 may only be ~10% stronger than tenex for static strength, it's dynamic capacity is far far higher. I used Wesspur's odd-lengths clearance section to make a killing on discounted Polydyne getting 1/2, 5/8 and 3/4 and using that 3/4 to make my slings, I spent a scratch under $200 for it all (except the Safebloc and the 3-ring sling, already had those) (1st pic is the slings complete the rest are just splicing pics although in that album there are side-by-side shots of the XL/Beast ring and the Safebloc & steel-thimbles)

If you don't want to splice, Gap Arbor is the only one I know of who's making rig&ring slings using optimal cordage (3/4 polydyne 5' slings there with 2 rings) Those are only 2 rings and one isn't an XL but at the same time 2 XL rings was what was needed for the crippling weights DD was testing, rigging out of a XL+Lr 2-ringed sling for most stuff is fine although ideally you'd have at least 1 more anchoring sling whenever practical to help spread load/equalize/etc (and induce more friction, if your line runs through 5 ringed-redirects on its way to the Safebloc terminal anchor you'll effectively be putting serious 'brakes' on the log, reducing peak dynamic forces on the tree & resultant bounce for you, reducing stress to the bull ropes & hardware in the system, allowing you to either work safer, work more efficiently, or some combo thereof!)

I'd consider what type of work I do the most of IE if you're always blocking-down tall conifers then the quick-adjustability of a whoopie sling may make going w/ tenex the best choice for you in that particular case (ie adjustability beating-out strength-optimization), loopies seem far more versatile/adjustability-range than whoopies but I'd get something with the longest range possible so you've got a versatile sling unless you're OK buying extra slings to have varying types of cordage, I think that's a 'foundational' decision to make in one's rigging kit IE I have my two super-long tailed slings instead of having 3-5 specific slings like a whoopie for things up to 5' then a 10' ultrasling then a 3' loop - when you're on a skinny spar then a whoopie is certainly simple, when you've just gotta wrap-over a branch for positive-angle rigging then the looped versions are simplest (or rig&ring versions), I chose to have less slings that have more uses by going with the long tails but definitely admit that a more costly kit with a greater # of slings would allow me more convenience although not more versatility, my long-tails are as versatile as-can-be!

Also....
Safebloc V 'notch triple-thimble'....blows my mind they even sell that thing I couldn't imagine choosing it over a Safebloc (nevermind that the name is almost a dead-ripoff of DD's original name for the Safebloc ie "THT/triple-hole-thimble"...), if the thing was significantly cheaper then sure maybe it'd be neat to have one but Safeblocs are amazing I couldn't recommend any single product more than the Safebloc in fact I'm planning to get at least 1 more of them to setup as a basal anchor (for use on solo rigging as well as a "fixed-level brake" when on the line right-above a bollard at the basal position, to lower peak dynamic loading and to increase control of the log via the rope) Seriously wouldn't trade my XL ring for a triple-thimble-sling (though I'd trade my 3-ring sling for a loose Safebloc w/o hesitation!)

And Re anodization....I was worried about it at first (of having it chip/peel) but this anodization is unlike any I've ever seen/had I mean it is hard as nails, there's 1 case I can find of where someone's gone through the anodizing (was posted to this forum) but they readily admit it was an odd use-case, if you run lines that are dirty then you'd theoretically be 'sandpapering' that coating when running long distances of cordage through them, this had me worried initially as well, but the reality is these have been very popular for over half a decade now, if their 5yr-degradation-path were a shitty one (re anodization) then there'd be more complaints, more pics of degraded rings online, etc. If I were buying new rings I can't say I'd care very much if they were anodized or not, I'd probably go with non-anodized simply because they're cheaper and the fact they'd have a *little* more friction is appealing to me (but not to everyone!) but it wouldn't be rooted in concern about the anodization's integrity not at all!


Good luck, sorry for length I just figured something there will surely help as that's such a comparable lineup to where my head was at like 2mo ago when starting my 'heavy duty rigging' kit quest, definitely would urge you to ensure a Safebloc is part of your kit and if I were going to want full versatility (IE a long-tailed sling) on anything in my kit it'd be my Safebloc! And again would strongly urge consideration of splicing, it's a very worthwhile skill to have as an arborist and, if planning to learn it eventually anyways, at a time when you're about to get multiple slings for a rigging kit, it'd be a good time to just go to wesspur's odd-lengths clearance-price section and get your cordage there, they'll have polydyne/atlas/nystron in the 0-50', 50-100' and 100'+ categories there must've been nearly 10 entries for polydyne when I chose mine, the rope's perfect it's just pre-selected lengths is all, by splicing myself and using a steel-rope-thimble it costs ~$30 for a 15', 3/4 p.dyne, 3/4" steel-rope-thimble sling, again not a terminal-rigging point due to insufficient bend radius but that's just $30, illustrative of the chasm between 'real' value of these things versus the MSRP's being charged, definitely an area where you're getting fleeced for not being able to splice yourself but also one where you're selection/versatility is limited. Best of luck with your kit!!!!
 

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