What's the best rope for tree climbing?

Ironbiscuit

New Member
I am just getting into tree climbing and looking to buy a 100 ft. rope that's light enough to carry around. What should I get?
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
Well....100 ft of any arborist climbing rope from the online stores will be around 6 lbs. The main criteria for narrowing selection are gear and techniques. Yale and Samson make good all-rounders, but any 24 strand double braid will get you goin vertical. Smaller diameter=less weight=harder to grip
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
All comes down to how you want to climb, srt, ddrt Blake’s hutch, mechanical prusik, each type of rope has its specialties. Call a good local gear supplier, if there’s one in your area, or call Gap Arborist Supply down the street from me, and they can help you pick something well suited to your climbing style and budget.
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Solid advice from Reach.
Post some specifics about your climbing system, and you’ll probably get lots of advice based on other’s experience.

If you’re doing DdRT/ MRS I still like 16 strand 1/2”. Samson Arbormaster, Yale XTC, and New England/ Teufberger Safety Blue all really feel and perform the same as far as I can tell. Maybe I’m not the most perceptive though, there’s probably subtle differences. Really tough climbing ropes that will last years if you avoid sharp stuff and excessive friction and heat.

SRT, I’ve only used a couple ropes. So far though, I love X-static.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
I am just getting into tree climbing and looking to buy a 100 ft. rope that's light enough to carry around. What should I get?
After climbing for a long time I’ve got a collection of many ropes that are in great shape but too short for usual climbing. Why do most ropes get knicked in the middle leaving two too short ropes?

I’d make you a good deal on the ropes so you could get the feel of different ropes and different construction.

some multicenders seem to favor certain ropes or certain rope construction. That’s why it’s good to know what you’re using for ascent

when I’ve climbed west coast big trees there’s very little limb walking planned or yo yo climbing. In that case I’d choose a very low stretch rope. I’d ascend using my Unicender in place of a chest ascender. I know it works well on KMIII. For descent I’d change over to a dedicated spool or bobbin descender with a panic brake. This setup would not be a good choice for shorter trees or for moving up and down in the tree. Wait...I’d use the same setup for ascent and descent though

I’ve got a cat rescue in the morning. Time for sleep
 

RamblinTrevor

New Member
After climbing for a long time I’ve got a collection of many ropes that are in great shape but too short for usual climbing. Why do most ropes get knicked in the middle leaving two too short ropes?

I’d make you a good deal on the ropes so you could get the feel of different ropes and different construction.

some multicenders seem to favor certain ropes or certain rope construction. That’s why it’s good to know what you’re using for ascent

when I’ve climbed west coast big trees there’s very little limb walking planned or yo yo climbing. In that case I’d choose a very low stretch rope. I’d ascend using my Unicender in place of a chest ascender. I know it works well on KMIII. For descent I’d change over to a dedicated spool or bobbin descender with a panic brake. This setup would not be a good choice for shorter trees or for moving up and down in the tree. Wait...I’d use the same setup for ascent and descent though

I’ve got a cat rescue in the morning. Time for sleep
Tom, if OP doesnt take you up on this, I'm super interested. Only climbed on blue moon and looking to understand rope flex and static vs dynamic in the tree.
 

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