What should I do about this tree with a gall?

Winchman

Active Member
It's about twenty feet up on a sixty-foot oak (or maybe cherry) tree. IMG_3324 (2).JPG IMG_3328 (2).JPG

The tree appears to be healthy otherwise, and it hasn't changed much in the twelve years I've been here. All of the gall is firm material, no soft rotten stuff. The uppermost part of the tree could hit the house if it broke at the gall, but it probably wouldn't do major damage.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't do anything with it. Might be worth having a local Certified Arborist look at it (expect to pay for a consultation). Not the biggest "we remove trees cheap" ad in the yellow pages - I can tell you what their answer is.

It is a black cherry.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Shipping is going to be killer. Maybe it will fit in a USPS flat rate box? thought I saw something about the cost of those going up later this month. Better get it before then.
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
No, no, no! Ignore these false prophets and purveyors of bad advice! There's only one sensible approach to this problem. Cut the tree down, cut out the burl... er... I mean, diseased, highly dangerous bump... and ship it to me immediately. I will do a scientific study of it and email you pictures of any bowls or wooden legs that happen to come off my lathe.

Don't risk your life and property over a silly bump on a log (eyes up @JD3000)... it's just better to leave these things to the professionals.
 

Winchman

Active Member
An oblong or oval bowl would be in order since it's already hollowed out on one side with two bumps for the base on the other.

Yeah, burl is not only the correct term, it sounds better, too. Thanks.

I probably missed an opportunity for an interesting pine bowl here.
IMG_3302.JPG
 

Alec

New Member
I was teaching a class yesterday in which someone asked about twig galls and their health implications. They specifically asked whether or not they're an energy sink. It occurred to me that maybe more than being a direct drain, they interrupt normal vascular function. Anyone know anything about whether galls and burls impact vigor by slowing movement of resources?
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Both to a degree. Depending on the placement, they can slow or disrupt vascular flow. But usually not enough to cause problems...but some times they do. Black knot on Prunus and Horned oak gall are 2 that come to mind. Even the burl on the OP's picture there has to be some, at least minor, disruption to cambium.

As to an energy sink - not sure how significant, but it has to be. This is plant tissue...the plant, therefore, has to use photosynthates to make them. That means less sugar for something else.
 
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