What Kind of Oak?

harrisonmg

New Member
Location
Fairfield
Hi! I just measured and photographed this oak at a property yesterday and when I asked the owners what type of tree it was, they said they didn't know but would like to. Looking at the leaves I can immediately rule out your common species in the Connecticut area like Red, White, and Pin. But beyond that I am stumped as to whether it could be an English Oak, Sessile Oak, Turkey Oak, Swamp White Oak, or other. Any ideas? It's up to 130 feet across, 70 feet tall, and 160 inches in circumference. Thanks!

View attachment PXZ_0161.JPG View attachment PXZ_0186.JPG View attachment PXZ_0167.JPG
 

Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
Holy moly! I would lean towards English given its size. My grandmother lives next to one in Jamestown RI that has a plaque and is in a historic registry of some sort. The Jamestown English oak has fissures on the bark, a bit wavy and fairly deep, very similar to what is pictured.

No picture of it but some information on the Jamestown tree..

“This tree may not be a calendar girl, but it’s an award winner in another way. It’s reported to have the largest trunk — at over 171 inches, according to Town Forester Dave Nickerson — of any English oak in New England. That trunk comes in handy to hold its 78-foot height and 91-foot crown spread .

Obviously, the English oak isn’t a native around here, but when ships came over from England in Colonial days, they used this species’ acorns as packing material. That was irresistible to the local squirrels that spread them around the island. So now we have relatives right here on the island of the famous oaks of Sherwood Forest where Robin Hood and his Merrie Men lived.”
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Location
Arlington
Bark looks like white oak. Size and form looks like white oak. Leaves look like swamp white oak. Native area correlates. So that's what I'll go with, Swamp White Oak, Quercus bicolor.
EDIT - add to that the acorn on yours, though not mature, is not elongated, and appears to have hair; further supporting Swamp White Oak.
 
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Stumpsprouts

Well-Known Member
Location
Asheville
Bark looks like white oak. Size and form looks like white oak. Leaves look like swamp white oak. Native area correlates. So that's what I'll go with, Swamp White Oak, Quercus bicolor.
EDIT - add to that the acorn on yours, though not mature, is not elongated, and appears to have hair; further supporting Swamp White Oak.
Zooming in on the acorn it looks pretty clear this is Swamp White Oak Q.bicolor. Not the merrie men’s English Q. robur that I was so excited about. I do not see this as a Q. alba.
 

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