What do you think of my recommendation?

climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
Customer called to have this tree pruned.

Was wondering your opinions on this crack / risk asssessment of this tree. I know pictures don’t do it justice.

I recommended that at some point she maybe consider cabling to add support because of those cracks. I don’t do cabling so all I would be able to assist with is the pruning. A lot of dead wood, split branches overgrowth etc. definitely needs trimming.

My question is do you think it is still reasonable to go head and prune it first which it definitely needs, or should I be recommending it get taken down etc. or something else?
 

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Njdelaney

Branched out member
Location
Detroit
That's a Mulberry and these kind of splits, cracks and dead wood are very common in my experience. If she likes wildlife it's a keeper. Also, you'll get lots of repeat business from this tree because of their growth habits. If this tree splits in half at that crack, the two halves will probably fall on the ground and continue growing so it doesn't really need help, just guidance lol. I'm guessing that cabling is the responsible choice here but probably not necessary to safely climb, they're hardwood trees and quite strong. I'm partial to these trees so you'll probably get different advice from others here.
 

owScott

Branched out member
Location
Lafayette
Like you said, hard to tell the whole story from pictures. Not only is possiblity of failure part of tree risk assessmnet but also what is it going to hit if it fails and what are the consequences. Our job is to evaluate risk level and make recommendations for mitigation. The customer makes the decision.
 

climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
I did explain that it could increase the likelihood of failure.

But I’m unsure in determining how much of a weak point / risk that actually is.

They want to go forward with having it pruned and preserving the tree and understood my advise that it could be an issue at some point and be a risk, that maybe they should consider cabling at some point etc.

I just wonder whether I should be recommending they take it down or if I’m on the right track here.
 

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
what my un experienced eye sees: included bark and rot, failure is obviously more likely, but if cabled correctly should have a reduced chance, I dont like the fact there is a building in the way of where it would fall should it split, so id be worried about that

other than that, there is a bunch of similar looking trees on my property, and none of em have come down yet
except for that one that got split in half (big live oak fell on it, and split it right down the middle, never seen that before)
 

climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
More or less that's what I advised.

But if they still want me to prune it do you think I should go forth with doing so, or should I not be recommending pruning at all but total removal, or cabling first, etc. Pruning it first would probably make it easier for whoever may cable it if they have it done.
 

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
like I said, I have very little experience with trees like this but will help as I can

id prune it, and take a good look at the damage to get a better idea, also, if your climbing it, id probably put a block on either side and a rope thru those to pull them together some, to reduce the force your putting on one side or the other, more or less sharing the load as to not make it worse or split out from under you

and yes, a total removal would be better (my opinion, anyone is welcome to dis agree with that)
 

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
if its an option, maybe do the prune, have the customer look at it afterwards and decide (Keep in mind, your the pro, and probably know more about each specific type of damage than the customer or I do)

reading the original post again, weight reduction + pruning then cable would a a decent route to go
 

oldoakman

Been here a while
Location
Alorgia
The tree is very close to a building/house making root issues in the future an issue to seriously consider. I am dealing with a client right now that has a White Oak 20-25 feet from his foundation where the roots may be causing a problem.
 

climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
Cabling is something I want to get into. I’ve done it once under direction of someone else when I tried out for a company years ago before I started my own business.

Any recommendations for resources (books etc.) to learn more about the practice?

I have some woods area behind my house I was thinking about buying some cables and practicing on some of the trees in there.


So I ended up making the recommendation to the customer to get a second opinion from someone who deals with these kinds of structural issues who may be able to cable etc. Explained that my area of expertise is primarily pruning / trimming.

All I can do is be honest. I’m trying to give customers honest advice even if it means I don’t end up getting a job because they end up hiring someone else.
 

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
The tree is very close to a building/house making root issues in the future an issue to seriously consider. I am dealing with a client right now that has a White Oak 20-25 feet from his foundation where the roots may be causing a problem.
I didnt even think of that

if removal is an option, id go for it after seeing the issues (Rot, included bark, splitting, roots damaging foundation, and the tree being in a place where if it splits the building is gonna be crushed)
 

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
Cabling is something I want to get into. I’ve done it once under direction of someone else when I tried out for a company years ago before I started my own business.

Any recommendations for resources (books etc.) to learn more about the practice?

I have some woods area behind my house I was thinking about buying some cables and practicing on some of the trees in there.


So I ended up making the recommendation to the customer to get a second opinion from someone who deals with these kinds of structural issues who may be able to cable etc. Explained that my area of expertise is primarily pruning / trimming.

All I can do is be honest. I’m trying to give customers honest advice even if it means I don’t end up getting a job because they end up hiring someone else.
thats the right way to do it, get someone out there that specializes in this type of damage
 

climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
I'm going to just include this statement in my quote:

"Customer has been informed that the tree in the corner next to neighbor's garage has cracks / decay in trunk which could increase the risk for structural failure and cause property damage to both her property and the neighbor's property if structural failure occurs."
 
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Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
Cabling is something I want to get into. I’ve done it once under direction of someone else when I tried out for a company years ago before I started my own business.

Any recommendations for resources (books etc.) to learn more about the practice?
One idea.. hire a contract climber who can do the cabling, be up on the other side of the tree and learn firsthand. Give yourself extra time for learning and treat it as an investment in your skill set and company.
 

MA Arborist

Participating member
Location
Cape Cod
This is a large mulberry that my client wanted preserved.
We installed 4 threaded rods and 3 cables (those are 6’ rods in the pic).

This tree is at a bed and breakfast and the mulberry is the feature tree on the property. The expense was worth it for them.
 

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climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
I made all the appropriate recommendations but ultimately client is the one that makes the decision. So we are probably going to perform some pruning it on it, it’s very overgrown and has a lot of dead wood.

@MA Arborist If you don’t mind me changing the subject for a second, on that lift you just have the pad that attaches to outrigger but no bigger pad underneath like some people use.

I had a question about this the other day because I may rent a lift, possibly even for this mulberry drive and it doesn’t come with any other pads just the small one attached to outrigger

Is that acceptable if the outrigger has a pad underneath or should you still have a bigger square pad underneath that pad?

I’ve only used a lift once before. Pretty much have stuck to climbing everything but have the capabilities to start using bigger equipment now.
 
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