What are your thoughts on this heavy leaner skinny tree

climbingmonkey24

Active Member
Just curious for the sake of discussion, what would you do and how would you handle this. Bucket or lift not an option. Nor crane.

Little skinny tree leaning right on top of house. Very heavy lean.

My thought plan was, climb as high as can (probably to that good sized branch that is almost flat going out over roof) and use pole saw to piece top out. Put climb line in the tree next to it for better stability.

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colb

Well-Known Member
It's hard to tell exactly what you are worried about. You might try dumping the top onto that lower branch with some rigging, then dicing it up and tossing it. dumping the top first allows you to use the force dampening capacity of all the tree limbs. You could also rig the top to the smaller leader if you are worried about your personal safety, and just keep a hand on the rope if you are working solo. Also, it is probably okay for the tips to land on the roof gently if you need to let it run partly. you can protect the roof with cardboard from that kind of impact if you need to. Again, not sure what you are worried about because it is hard to tell from the pictures. I can tell that there is something that matters quite a bit to you and that is important to pay attention to.
 

climbingmonkey24

Active Member
Well to be honest I haven’t worked a lot on skinny trees with a heavy lean like this. It’s just not something that comes up regularly with my clients.

I’m worried about being able to climb high enough to cut where I need to so doesn’t hit the roof.

Is it even safe enough to climb high enough without worrying about it breaking near top, etc.
 

ppsavage

Active Member
It's hard to tell from the photos but would it be an option to tip tie a large top rigged into the big tree with another rope attached to the the leaner, below the cut, butt tied, stand up the top or get it to swing to the large tree with a grcs or hobbs.
 

climbingmonkey24

Active Member
It's hard to tell from the photos but would it be an option to tip tie a large top rigged into the big tree with another rope attached to the the leaner, below the cut, butt tied, stand up the top or get it to swing to the large tree with a grcs or hobbs.
I was thinking along those lines as an option. The thing is there is some distance between big tree and leaner so it’s possible that’s the top is going to drop down and there is some type antenna on garage right there.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
I was thinking along those lines as an option. The thing is there is some distance between big tree and leaner so it’s possible that’s the top is going to drop down and there is some type antenna on garage right there.
One thing I sometimes do with those is to bypass climbing up the trunk on spikes and just srt rope ascent to a TIP at the top where I want to make my cut to pop the top. That way I can pull test before I get going. The force dynamics can be awkward if the rope gets away from the trunk, and if the top is side pulling as it comes off.

Another idea - if it is so small that it is awkward to climb, you might tip tie it, winch/MA it to a rigging point in one of those trees behind, and cut the base on the diagonal so it slides down and spikes in the ground. You can do 5 foot sections like that until the top is heavier than the butt and it flips over. Have you done that before? the base kind of creeps around, so you have to think about where you want it to go and how that relates to the orientation of the cut. I tend to do bore cuts so I can evaluate where the kerf is compressing or opening up, then I release it on the side that lets me keep my saw without it getting trapped in the kerf. No climbing at all with that method...
 

SeanRuel

Well-Known Member
100% rig it into the tree behind it. Looks like you could hang the whole thing off the larger one.

Set a line as high as you can in the leaner Face it up away from the house, pull it over until it's touching the other tree. Then cut logs off the bottom, lowering as needed
 

climbingmonkey24

Active Member
The tree behind it is actually quite a distance away. Not as close as it looks and the majority of the branches high enough to rig the whole thing like that (which I’ve done with trees in the past) are real skinny and couldn’t support the weight.
 

Z'sTrees

Well-Known Member
What is it? Ash? Any reason you can't pull it 180 off the lean? Most hardwoods will hinge well enough for that.
Otherwise climb high enough to handle everything or use an adjacent tree to rig bigger. Can tip or mid tie to neighboring tree and but tie to itself to sweep away from the roof without much drop.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
A remote tip might make you more comfortable, but it seems like an opportunity to expand your comfort zone.
I imagine the drop zone is not great and the other trees around are pretty far for rigging. In similar situations I have been able to cut and chuck with a remote tip. One thing yet to come up is a guy line set up reasonably high in the top and tensioned for stability. It's easier to climb something that isn't swaying and wiggling around. Good luck.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
I'm horrible, but I'd love to see video of your climb. It's always hilarious to see a guy climb up something that is out of their comfort zone, lol. I've done my share of humping and hugging and half hour waits between steps, lol. On a serious note, you do need to stay within your comfort zone regardless of what us couch-sitting popcorn-popping mofos tell you to do, or even regardless of what is possible. This is all about you and your comfort zone at this place in your career.
 
Looks like a tricky one, You'll come up with a plan. May take a few rigging ropes and some good groundies but you'll get her down
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Agreed with NeSurfcaster.

I do a lot of work from a more comfortable or safer vantage point using a Marvin(?) extendable pole hook to set rig rope 15 feet away or so. Then I can cut pieces that are 12 or 15 feet away from where I want to be with a Stihl extendable pole saw( or Husky Battery pole saw.) Tihis allows for things like rigging a lighter top into another tree, rigging a top etc from a different tree altogether, or when room allows just cutting a bunch of pieces small enough to freefall until I've got it down to a safe tree to climb itself, or tripping a piece that has ripped etc and I would risk a $600 saw if things went sideways but never do the same cut with me right there.

If I was doing that job and it looked in person like it looks in pictures I would set a great tie in point in the bigger tree, climb the skinny one on a windless day taking everything low out on the way up, use the extendable Marvin pole hook to tip tie each "top" higher up and while lanyarded into another "top" drop and catch the first top on about 4 inches of it's own wood. Rinse and repeat.

All of this from someone who never bids jobs by pictures though.
 
Hard to tell - but I just did an oak that was on a hillside, ground was heaving toward the house, and had a similar scenario - nothing to tie into above or nearby and all the force and lean going over the roof downhill. To mitigate the lean, we secured two guy lines to the base of two fir trees opposing the lean in the neighbor's yard and tied them about 2/3 up the oak. It helped with piece of mind and comfort when rigging and climbing. I kept the pieces small until the ground stopped heaving and slack started to show in the guy lines. Not sure if that will help in this scenario.
 

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