Weird Thing I Noticed With SDS Sheet vs Label

Jzack605

Well-Known Member
Location
Long island
I got into a bit of a debate of the toxicity of a few different ai's on another site, abamectin and pyrethrin. The latter ai is the main one. He produced an SDS sheet that puts pyrethrin with a DANGER signal word, where the labels have it as CAUTION. I'm having a hard time finding a rational for pyrethrin having the highest level signal and trying to make sense of the inconsistency.

Here is the SDS Label:

Here is the first page of the label with CAUTION:
1600041113957.png

Here is an excerpt from the SDS that may explain?
FIFRA – Pesticide Labeling This chemical is a pesticide product registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and is subject to certain labeling requirements under federal pesticide law. These requirements differ from the classification criteria and hazard information required for safety data sheets (SDS), and for workplace labels of nonpesticide chemicals. The hazard information required on the pesticide label is reproduced below. The pesticide label also includes other important information, including directions for use. CAUTION
I never noticed this and was wondering if anyone could explain these differences?
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
Without reading the labels, perhaps the concentration level makes the difference? Pure pyrethrin is a DANGER signal, but mixed to a lower concentration, or with other chemicals in it, is only CAUTION? Just a conjecture, don’t put too much weight on it.
 

Jzack605

Well-Known Member
Location
Long island
That's what I was thinking? Maybe it's the fire hazard of pyretherin that gives it the DANGER signal?

I'm not sure why it would be different on the SDS labal for Pyronyl Crop Spray vs the label on the bottle though.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
It's a matter of LD50 whether the signal word changes.

Pyrethrin can be pretty nasty stuff but I personally respond poorly to using abamectin. I would get flu like symptoms with enough exposure to it so I stopped using it.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
That could be. I don’t know pyrethrin real well, I know herbicides better than pesticides.

SDS sheets and pesticide labels are written for different purposes and are governed by different agencies if I remember correctly, so maybe that’s the difference?
 

Jzack605

Well-Known Member
Location
Long island
I wear a respirator when making abamectin applications and limit them to only when necessary.

The whole premise of the discussion was that the other individual was trying to compare them as being equally toxic and I find that to be complete BS.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I just reread the first post and realized I misunderstood your original question. I thought the comparison was between SDS sheets and pesticide labels, not between two different pesticides. My apologies for my error there.
 

Jzack605

Well-Known Member
Location
Long island
No it’s between the SDS label vs the label on the bottle for pyronyl specifically. The SDS has a danger signal word where the label has the caution.

The other individual was simply putting the two different pesticides at the same level as far as toxicity goes based on those SDS sheets which I was having a hard time finding a rational for. Especially Pyrethrin being derived from chrysanthemum and often having an OMRI stamp.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
Organically derived has nothing to do with danger to the applicator. It would have more to do with the residue on the finished product or plant. My guess would be that the pesticide would break down very quickly making it food safe whereas the applicator is still stuck with applying a potentials toxic product.
 

Jzack605

Well-Known Member
Location
Long island
Very true of course.

But the OMRI stamp does seem to taken toxicity into account, even with organically derived products. I’ve always trusted them to have “safer” products on their list as an unbiased source. Pyrethrins being on their list of ai. Although not sure if pyronyl or equivalent is on there.

I think I’m just having a hard time understanding why the signal words would be different as well as a rational to the two being comparable as far as toxicity goes.

Sorry I think I muddied the waters of the original question when I introduced the other product into the equation.
 

Jzack605

Well-Known Member
Location
Long island
Thanks for digging that up. Google wasn’t much help for me but may have been how I was searching. That’s interesting, and still somewhat confusing. Leaves me asking the question why would a pesticide label jump from caution to danger. And why eliminate caution all together.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
Very true of course.

But the OMRI stamp does seem to taken toxicity into account, even with organically derived products. I’ve always trusted them to have “safer” products on their list as an unbiased source. ...
20% acetic acid (horticultural vinegar) is far more dangerous (skin burns, permanent eye damage) than many, many other herbicides on the market... (especially more so than glyphosate)
 

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